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"Worrying" signs of infection in elderly patients if the R-rate exceeds 1


SAGE has warned England is now on the verge of losing control of a new Covid outbreak as signs of coronavirus are "worrying" in middle-aged people as infections increase 92 percent in those over 50.

More than 3,000 cases of coronavirus were officially recorded yesterday, while a government-conducted study by Imperial College London showed the number of infections doubled every week.

Public Health England (PHE) data suggests the number of Covid-19 cases is skyrocketing those over 50 when senior officials warned of "worrying" signs of risk groups last night. Last week, infections rose 92 percent in people ages 50 to 59, 72 percent in people in their 60s, and 44 percent in people in their 80s and older.

The number of approvals related to Covid rose in the past week compared to the previous week for 60 to 75 year olds by 20 percent, for 75 to 84 year olds by 72 percent and for 85 year olds by 67 percent .

A PHE source said there was massive concern in official circles that the surge in Covid cases could lead to more hospitalizations, telling The Daily Telegraph, "The big concern is that this is what comes next . "

Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at PHE, said: “3,539 new cases of Covid-19 were reported overnight, compared to 2,919 yesterday. Most of these cases are people who have been community tested.

“Although younger people remain the largest proportion of new cases, we are now seeing increasingly worrying signs of infection in older people, who are at a far higher risk of getting seriously ill.

& # 39; This is a reminder of the ongoing risk of the virus spreading across the UK. People should continue to follow social distancing rules, wash their hands regularly, and wear face covering indoors. & # 39;

The government is applying panic restrictions across England. Boris Johnson's draconian new "rule of six" is due to come into effect on Monday amid fears that the "R" reproductive rate could reach 1.7.

Government scientist Sir Mark Walport warned the British public today that the nation was on the verge of losing control of the virus when he urged people to cut off from friends and family.

In other coronavirus developments in the UK today:

  • Boris Johnson outlines new plans for punishing people who break the quarantine.
  • Cabinet Secretary Michael Gove said today Sir Mark Walport's words were a "warning to all of us";
  • He urged young people to act in accordance with the rule of six and said freedom should be exercised responsibly.
  • The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has also rejected claims that Eat Out To Help Out contributed to the broadcast;
  • Police chiefs warned people to avoid a "party weekend" before new anti-Covid restrictions are put in place

PHE data from The Daily Telegraph suggests Covid-19 cases are increasing among those over 50 as senior officials warned of "worrying" signs for high-risk groups last night. Last week the infections apparently increased by 92 percent in those over 50, by 72 percent in those over 60 and by 44 percent in those over 80

Last week, infections increased by 92 percent in those over 50, by 72 percent in those over 60 and by 44 percent in those over 80 (Photo: People with face masks and visors in Leeds, July 23, 2020) )

Last week, infections increased by 92 percent among those over 50, 72 percent among 60-year-olds and 44 percent among those over 80 (Photo: People with face masks and visors in Leeds, July 23, 2020) )

Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said: “3,539 new cases of Covid-19 were reported overnight, compared to 2,919 yesterday. Most of these cases are people who have been community tested.

Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said: “3,539 new cases of Covid-19 were reported overnight, compared to 2,919 yesterday. Most of these cases are people who have been community tested.

The government is applying panic restrictions across England. Boris Johnson's draconian new "rule of six" is due to come into effect on Monday amid fears that the "R" reproductive rate could reach 1.7

The government is applying panic restrictions across England. Boris Johnson's draconian new "rule of six" is due to come into effect on Monday amid fears that the "R" reproductive rate could reach 1.7

More than 3,000 cases of coronavirus were officially recorded yesterday, while a government-conducted study by Imperial College London showed the number of infections doubled every week

More than 3,000 cases of coronavirus were officially recorded yesterday, while a government-conducted study by Imperial College London showed the number of infections doubled every week

Experts who dabbed tens of thousands of people in England found that 13 per 10,000 people were infected between August 22 and September 7, compared with four per 10,000 between July 24 and August 11.

The weekly cases in men ages 60 to 69 increased from 221 to 352 over the past week, an increase of 60 percent, while women in the same age group saw an increase of 72 percent from 219 to 376.

Was Eat Out to Help Behind UK Covid Case? "Rapid acceleration" in cases could be linked to an extremely popular scheme, says the Oxford researcher

A "rapid acceleration" in coronavirus cases could be linked to the hugely popular Eat Out to Help Out program, an Oxford University researcher said.

The program, in which the government presented 50 percent of the bill up to £ 10 per capita Monday through Wednesday in participating restaurants, was hailed as the savior of the hospitality industry.

However, a new report from Oxford University policy researcher Toby Phillips suggests the program may have helped "accelerate" reported infections in the UK and "encouraged extravagant eating habits".

Today, a government-run study found that coronavirus infections could double every week and the reproductive R-rate could be up to 1.7.

According to Health Secretary Matt Hancock, this dramatic increase in cases requires the introduction of additional measures, including the controversial strict new six-person rule, which legally prohibits gatherings of more than six people.

Officials had said that while the increase in cases was seen in younger age groups, it was likely to affect older people, followed by an increase in hospital stays.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the alleged spike in coronavirus infections justified the government's "arbitrary" new "rule of six" warning people "the pandemic is not over".

Imperial College London's REACT-1 study found that the epidemic doubled every seven to eight days. In comparison, Covid-19 infections doubled every three days at the beginning of the crisis.

The Ministry of Health confirmed on Friday that an additional 3,539 people were diagnosed with the coronavirus and six other people have died. The new diagnoses are the highest since May 17th.

And data from the Office of National Statistics suggests that 3,200 people get sick every day in England and Wales – a 45 percent increase from last week's forecast of 2,200.

The number of people who test positive may be higher because they weren't all tested on the same day and the test results take some time to process, which means they're not evenly distributed.

The Imperial results were released as the government prepared to introduce the new "Rule of Six" restriction on social gatherings starting Monday, which bans groups of seven or more from meeting indoors and outdoors.

Mr Hancock said on Friday, “The pandemic is not over yet and everyone has a role to play. It's so important that everyone obey the law and socialize in groups of up to six people, make space between you and people outside your household, get a test, and isolate themselves if you develop symptoms and wash your hands regularly . & # 39;

SAGE urges the public to abide by the new "rule of six" and Sir Mark Walport claims today that Britain is "on the verge of losing control of the coronavirus".

Speaking to the BBC's Radio 4 Today, government scientist Sir Mark said the government's R-rate study showed that people who contract coronavirus "weren't afraid to get it."

He recommended a & # 39; mix of carrots and whips & # 39; adding, 'It's one thing to have a rule, it's a matter of compliance. It's about making sure in public spaces that landlords actually get people to behave.

“I think we're about to lose control (of the virus). All you have to do is look across the canal to see what's going on in France and what's happening in Spain.

More than 3,000 cases of coronavirus were officially recorded yesterday, while a government-conducted study by Imperial College London showed the number of infections doubled every week

More than 3,000 cases of coronavirus were officially recorded yesterday, while a government-conducted study by Imperial College London showed the number of infections doubled every week

“The only way to stop this infection from spreading is to reduce the number of people we come into contact with. That means that we have to hold back our contacts in other areas.

“Where people can work from home, there is an extremely strong argument that they should. It is very difficult to control a disease if you cannot test and identify it. & # 39;

Michael Gove played a key role in enforcing the rule of six at the cabinet meeting in Covid – and was "consistently on the toughest approach," Quelle says

Michael Gove played a key role in enforcing this week's controversial Covid-19 clampdown that was revealed last night.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock was severely underdog at a meeting of Boris Johnson's Covid cabinet Tuesday when he put forward plans to lower the social gathering limit to just six.

Federal Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Economic Secretary Alok Sharma, Transport Minister Grant Shapps and Interior Minister Priti Patel are said to have spoken out in favor of an upper limit of at least eight.

However, a cabinet source said that Mr Gove also played a crucial role in ensuring the controversial rule of six was put in place.

& # 39; Michael drove that. He's been consistently on the toughest, most persistent approach for some time, ”the source said.

& # 39; There was a lot of dissent. The Prime Minister was utterly torn and the meeting did not end well. & # 39;

A cabinet minister told the Mail: "The numbers are terrible and it is clear that we have to do something.

"But the idea that the government is threatening to punish and arrest people for seeing their families makes me sick."

It comes amid reports that Boris Johnson has drawn up rigorous new plans to crack down on people who violate quarantine restrictions after an official study claimed that 20 percent routinely ignore self-isolation rules.

The prime minister is believed to be considering a carrot-and-stick approach where individuals who follow government orders could receive higher payments while in isolation.

The police have the power to impose fines of up to £ 1,000 for violating the quarantine, despite the fact that they were barely used. Only 34 people have been fined since the measures were introduced.

Ministers are even setting up a hotline for snoopers to report neighbors violating quarantine rules to the police – a measure recommended by officials at the beginning of the lockdown.

The proposal was discussed by cabinet ministers on Tuesday, according to The Times. A government source told the newspaper that the hotline plans were "exploratory" but not yet an official policy.

An increase in the sample rate by public health officials is also being prepared by ministers whose "rule of six" the ban on social gatherings of seven or more people in England goes into effect on Monday.

The Prime Minister said at a press conference on Downing Street last week that the government intended to recruit "Covid Marshals" to enforce coronavirus-specific guidelines like social distancing.

Under the strict new measures, groups of more than six people can be broken up by the police, who will be able to hand out £ 100 fines to those who break the rules. This doubles for each repeat offense, up to £ 3,200.

Ministers are planning tougher measures to ensure that arrivals in the UK provide their airport contact details as the government panics over an alleged surge in Covid cases.

The government's new quarantine restrictions for travelers from Portugal, Hungary, French Polynesia and Reunion went into effect at 4 a.m. today after Transport Minister Grant Shapps removed the countries from his quarantine exemptions list. Newcomers coming to England are required to self-isolate for 14 days.

MPs have criticized the government's attempts to enforce anti-Covid restrictions on Monday without a debate in parliament. Spokesman Lindsay Hoyle threatened to ask an urgent question if Matt Hancock refused to appear outside the House of Commons.

Cabinet minister Michael Gove called on people today to act in accordance with the rules this weekend before the "six rules" go into effect or the risk of increasing the rate of spread of the coronavirus.

Boris Johnson is drafting tough new plans to crack down on people who violate quarantine restrictions after an official study claimed that 20 percent of Covid patients routinely ignore self-isolation rules

Boris Johnson is drafting tough new plans to crack down on people who violate quarantine restrictions after an official study claimed that 20 percent of Covid patients routinely ignore self-isolation rules

The police are empowered to impose fines of up to £ 1,000 for violating the quarantine, despite the fact that they were barely used (Photo: Protesters in Wollaton Hall Park Nottingham on May 16, 2020. Two mass gatherings were to take place in Nottingham).

The police are empowered to impose fines of up to £ 1,000 for violating the quarantine, despite the fact that they were barely used (Photo: Protesters in Wollaton Hall Park Nottingham on May 16, 2020. Two mass gatherings were to take place in Nottingham).

Cabinet in the war over the rule of six: Almost every minister in Boris Johnson's Covid Committee spoke out against the strict limit – and even the prime minister himself was "cautious" – but Matt Hancock prevailed

Boris Johnson's Covid clampdown shared his cabinet, it surfaced last night.

He faces a violent Tory backlash over the controversial "Rules of Six" that bans gatherings of seven or more from Monday.

A number of senior ministers opposed the measure at a crunch meeting, including Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

A cabinet source said the rule of six was rejected Tuesday by every member of the prime minister's coronavirus strategy committee except Matt Hancock. The Minister of Health is said to have pushed the decision, supported by Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty and Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance.

"Everyone but Hancock wanted to set the limit on groups at eight or more," the source said.

Even the Prime Minister was initially cautious about lowering the limit to six. The majority believed that this level of social distancing will have a huge impact on people's lives and economies. But Hancock did it. & # 39;

When Mr Johnson announced the move on Wednesday, he insisted that it was necessary to keep virus cases under control even though it was heartbreaking to keep families apart.

Downing Street denied that the Prime Minister was involved in the decision by Mr. Hancock and the scientific advisers. "Nobody discussed the prime minister," said an insider.

However, several sources confirmed that ministers on the high-level committee disagreed on how far the legal limit on gatherings should be reduced to 30 people. "I wouldn't characterize it as a series, but it's fair to say that there has been a heated debate," said one.

Mr Sunak is said to have pushed for a limit of at least eight, and Economic Secretary Alok Sharma is said to have advocated a higher number. Transport Minister Grant Shapps is also said to have raised concerns.

His intervention comes when officials tell the Mail that a second national lockdown can be avoided if people follow the new "rule of six".

Speaking to BBC Breakfast this morning, Mr Gove said, “When people behave in a way that is not really in line with or in line with guidelines, they are putting other people at risk.

"The reason the country's police chiefs have said they hope people will act with reasonable restraint this weekend is because we don't want to see the virus spread accelerate further."

He denied the government would lose control of Covid-19. & # 39; No. I don't accept that, ”he said.

Mr Gove also denied claims that Chancellor Rishi Sunak's Eat Out To Help Out program helped spread the coronavirus, saying that fines may be required to enforce self-isolation rules.

Speaking to the BBC's Radio 4 Today, he said, "We are not saying that people shouldn't watch their friends, but there has to be a degree of self-discipline and limitation to face the challenges we face."

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster also responded to criticism of the government's crackdown on Covid, saying that people can only have freedom if they are exercised "responsibly".

"I don't want fines to be imposed, but more than that, I don't want people to behave in ways that put the most vulnerable at risk," Gove told the Today program this morning.

“Well, there are restrictions and I love freedom, but the one thing I think is more important is that you exercise freedom responsibly.

"When you exercise freedom, you should do it in a way that will not harm others."

In response to Sir Mark's warnings, Mr. Gove added, “I think Sir Mark's words … are a warning to us all.

"There are a number of scientific opinions, but one thing that virtually every scientist will agree on is that we have seen an increase in infections and so it is appropriate to take public health action."

Public health officials point to an alleged surge in Covid cases. A study carried out by the government yesterday suggests that the reproductive rate in England could be as high as 1.7.

With hundreds of Britons enjoying a final weekend of freedom, police chiefs urged people to watch out for each other and avoid a "party weekend" before the restrictions are implemented.

John Apter, National Police Federation Chairman of England and Wales, said: “There is a real risk that some members of the public will take advantage of the current situation and treat this weekend as a party weekend before tighter restrictions are put in place Monday.

“Alcohol and warm weather are not a good combination at best. Using the current situation as an opportunity and excuse to have a party would be incredibly irresponsible and put pressure not only on the police but possibly also on ambulance and the NHS.

“We are hit by a deadly pandemic and have seen more and more cases in recent weeks.

"The police are under pressure like never before, but my colleagues will issue writ of execution when they deem it appropriate and we do not apologize."

Elsewhere, budding night owls have been encouraged to stay home as Birmingham became the newest city to be affected by localized lockdown rules after the number of coronavirus patients admitted to hospitals doubled in a week.

As of Tuesday, more than 1.5 million people in Birmingham and neighboring Solihull and Sandwell will be banned from mingling with anyone outside their own household in private homes, pubs, restaurants or gardens.

Yesterday, police officers told the Telegraph they fear the UK will resemble "Rome's last days" after this weekend amid a storm of decadent pre-lockdown parties planned.

A northeast official said: “We are concerned that this weekend will be like the last days of Rome. If people think they can't go out and have fun for the next few months, they'll go crazy and we'll pick the pieces up. & # 39;

People gather at More London Place near London Bridge in London for another weekend of freedom before the government enforces its new rule of six starting Monday

People gather at More London Place near London Bridge in London for another weekend of freedom before the government enforces its new rule of six starting Monday

People gather outside the Shipwrights Arms near London Bridge on Friday for a final weekend of freedom before the new rules take effect

People gather outside the Shipwrights Arms near London Bridge on Friday for a final weekend of freedom before the new rules take effect

Under Boris Johnson's harsh new measures, groups of more than six people can be broken up by the police who will be able to hand out £ 100 fines to those who break the rules. This doubles for each repeat offense, up to £ 3,200. Pictured: London Bridge

Under Boris Johnson's harsh new measures, groups of more than six people can be broken up by the police who will be able to hand out £ 100 fines to those who break the rules. This doubles for each repeat offense, up to £ 3,200. Pictured: London Bridge

The British have promised to get excited and get on their knees with friends one last time before Boris Johnson's tough new coronavirus restrictions come into effect on Monday

The British have promised to get excited and get on their knees with friends one last time before Boris Johnson's tough new coronavirus restrictions come into effect on Monday

The British have promised to get upset and kneel with friends one last time before Mr Johnson's strict new coronavirus restrictions come into effect.

Many have to cancel parties after warning of a rapid surge in infections among people between the ages of 20 and 30 – but fears have grown that some will use the weekend as an opportunity to go wild despite the ongoing pandemic.

A senior official said they were not sure police had the resources to face the challenge of the thousands of people ignoring the restrictions this weekend.

Brian Booth, chairman of the West Yorkshire Police Federation, added that officers are "back to the mundane things like dealing with stab wounds, shootings, drug dealers, missing people, etc."

"If we are asked to focus on enforcement, there has to be something else," he said.

The government's new "rule of six" will be rolled out on Monday amid fears that coronavirus infections in England could double every week, with the reproductive R-rate at 1.7.

Mr Hancock yesterday insisted that the increased infection rate justified the government's recent restriction and warned people that the pandemic was not over yet.

As hundreds of Britons enjoyed a final weekend of freedom on Friday, police chiefs urged people to watch out for each other and avoid a "party weekend" before the restrictions are implemented. Pictured: Revelers in Nottingham

As hundreds of Britons enjoyed a final weekend of freedom on Friday, police chiefs urged people to watch out for each other and avoid a "party weekend" before the restrictions are implemented. Pictured: Revelers in Nottingham

Yesterday officials told the Telegraph they fear the UK will resemble "Rome's last days" after this weekend amid a storm of decadent pre-lockdown parties planned

Yesterday officials told the Telegraph they fear the UK will resemble "Rome's last days" after this weekend amid a storm of decadent pre-lockdown parties planned

People gather at Southbank Skatepark in Waterloo, London, ahead of the new rules that ban groups of more than six people

People gather at Southbank Skatepark in Waterloo, London, ahead of the new rules that ban groups of more than six people

The latest move to fight the spread of coronavirus was carried out yesterday in a government-conducted study that indicated that the UK's reproductive rate could be as high as 1.7. Pictured: Southbank on Friday

The latest move to fight the spread of coronavirus was carried out yesterday in a government-conducted study that indicated that the UK's reproductive rate could be as high as 1.7. Pictured: Southbank on Friday

Experts who dabbed tens of thousands of people during the crisis in England found that an estimated 13 per 10,000 people were infected between August 22 and September 7, compared with four per 10,000 people between July 24 and December 11 August.

The scientists behind a REACT-1 study from Imperial College London said the results showed that the size of the epidemic doubles every seven to eight days. In comparison, Covid-19 infections doubled every three days at the beginning of the crisis.

The Ministry of Health confirmed on Friday that an additional 3,539 people were diagnosed with the coronavirus and six other people have died. The new diagnoses are the highest since May 17th.

And data from the Office of National Statistics suggests that 3,200 people get sick every day in England and Wales – a 45 percent increase from last week's forecast of 2,200.

The number of people who test positive may be higher because they weren't all tested on the same day and the test results take some time to process, which means they're not evenly distributed.

Hundreds of people enjoyed a Friday night on the town in the pubs and bars of Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth, Hampshire

Hundreds of people enjoyed a Friday night on the town in the pubs and bars of Guildhall Walk in Portsmouth, Hampshire

A group of girls gather on the street in Portsmouth for a late night takeout meal before the 'Rule of Six' goes into effect

A group of girls gather on the street in Portsmouth for a late night takeout meal before the 'Rule of Six' goes into effect

Elsewhere in town, dozens of night owls stood close together as they waited to enter a busy club on Friday

Elsewhere in town, dozens of night owls stood close together as they waited to enter a busy club on Friday

The Imperial results were released as the government prepared to introduce the new "Rule of Six" restriction on social gatherings starting Monday, which bans groups of seven or more from meeting indoors and outdoors.

Mr Hancock said on Friday, “The pandemic is not over yet and everyone has a role to play.

"It's so important that everyone obey the law and socialize in groups of up to six people, make space between you and those outside your household, get a test, and isolate themselves if you develop symptoms and your hands regularly to wash."

Mr Johnson hopes the rule will help bring the virus back under control, but there is a growing Tory backlash because while children are tax exempt in Scotland and Wales, they are restricted in England like critics many family gatherings argue impossible.

Senior conservatives have called the rule "utterly grotesque" and have accused the government of an unacceptable attack on personal liberty and liberty. You have also criticized the ministers for getting the measure through without debate or vote in parliament.

The rule was agreed at a meeting of the government's coronavirus strategy committee earlier this week, but a number of senior ministers opposed it.

People in Manchester are sitting outside before new coronavirus rules are rolled out on Monday

People in Manchester are sitting outside before new coronavirus rules are rolled out on Monday

Others in town gathered near a wine bar while enjoying a night out with friends

Others in town gathered near a wine bar while enjoying a night out with friends

A group of women make their way to Manchester before the new rules go into effect on Monday

A group of women make their way to Manchester before the new rules go into effect on Monday

In other places in Manchester, groups were sitting together enjoying a beer outside a city center bar last night

In other places in Manchester, groups were sitting together enjoying a beer outside a city center bar last night

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the surge in infections justified the government's new rule of six, warning people that "the pandemic is not over". Pictured: Manchester

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the surge in infections justified the government's new rule of six, warning people that "the pandemic is not over". Pictured: Manchester

When Mr Johnson announced the tightening of restrictions at a # 10 briefing on Wednesday, Mr Johnson suggested that the "rule of six" on the number of people who can socialize continues for some time after the party ends the younger generation had triggered a sharp increase.

Aside from a vaccine, he said the only other way out before Christmas would be a "moon shot" of introducing daily mass testing for everyone, but admitted that "it all has to come together".

The Prime Minister said infection rates among 17 to 18 year olds and 19 to 21 year olds had increased "very sharply" since mid-August.

In a direct appeal to young people, Mr Johnson said that they should consider their behavior "for the good of your parents" and the health of your grandparents.

The limit is a dramatic reduction from the July 4th maximum of 30.

It is because Birmingham became the newest city to be hit by new draconian lockdown rules yesterday after the number of coronavirus patients admitted to hospitals in the city doubled in a week.

As of Tuesday, more than 1.5 million people in Birmingham and neighboring Solihull and Sandwell will be banned from mingling with anyone outside their own household in private homes, pubs, restaurants or gardens.

The Prime Minister said infection rates among 17 to 18 year olds and 19 to 21 year olds had increased "very sharply" since mid-August. Pictured: Nottingham last night

The Prime Minister said infection rates among 17 to 18 year olds and 19 to 21 year olds had increased "very sharply" since mid-August. Pictured: Nottingham last night

As of Monday, it will be illegal to gather in groups of seven or more across England, indoors or outdoors. Pictured: Manchester

As of Monday, it will be illegal to gather in groups of seven or more across England, indoors or outdoors. Pictured: Manchester

The move follows two days of crunch talks between the government and local health leaders after the 7-day infection rate in Birmingham rose to 78 cases per 100,000.

It's difficult to compare the current case rate in Birmingham now to what it was at the height of the pandemic due to the lack of comprehensive testing during the first wave – meaning thousands of cases were overlooked and never appeared in the data.

As of Tuesday, more than a million people in Birmingham will be banned from mingling with anyone outside their own household. The rules also apply to 500,000 people in neighboring Solihull and Sandwell, where infections have risen suddenly and significantly

As of Tuesday, more than a million people in Birmingham will be banned from mingling with anyone outside their own household. The rules also apply to 500,000 people in neighboring Solihull and Sandwell, where infections have risen suddenly and significantly

Dr. David Rosser, executive director of the NHS Trust of University Hospitals in Birmingham, said hospitals in his city see twice as many patients as they did last week. He warned that the virus was on an "exponential curve" in the city and that the number of visitors would double again in seven days.

Seven people are struggling for their lives in intensive care with the disease and 68 are on wards at the NHS hospitals of Queen Elizabeth and Heartlands, according to local reports. And more than 800 people tested positive for the virus in the past week, meaning many could be just days away from needing hospital care.

West Midlands Mayor Andy Street announced the rules in the West Midlands this afternoon, saying, “The following areas are now escalating into an area of ​​national intervention, with a ban on contact with anyone outside their own household.

"The ban will go into effect on Tuesday September 15th. However, residents are advised to avoid household mixing until then as it has been identified as one of the drivers of the transmission." He added the bans for all of Birmingham, Sandwell and Solihull.

'This decision was made in collaboration with local executives who are considering additional local measures to combat the increase in the number of cases. To emphasize, this is about shuffling between households, it's not about preventing schools, jobs, transportation or any other option – it's about shuffling between households. & # 39;

Birmingham City Council chair Ian Ward said the number of new infections at social gatherings and in private homes has risen sharply – as has happened in other hotspots such as Bolton, Leicester and parts of Scotland, Wales and North West England.

A man tries to take his friend away when he speaks to a police officer on the streets of Cardiff on Friday night

A man tries to take his friend away when he speaks to a police officer on the streets of Cardiff on Friday night

A man grappled with police and security outside a bar in Cardiff last weekend before the Six Rules Act went into effect

A man grappled with police and security outside a bar in Cardiff last weekend before the Six Rules Act went into effect

A large group of women is seen in Cardiff on one night just days before such gatherings are banned under new law

A large group of women is seen in Cardiff on one night just days before such gatherings are banned under new law

Official PHE figures show that the case rate in Birmingham was below 30 per 100,000 by the end of August but has risen to 78 per 100,000 in less than two weeks

Official PHE figures show that the case rate in Birmingham was below 30 per 100,000 by the end of August but has risen to 78 per 100,000 in less than two weeks

Health Secretary Matt Hancock reiterated the Councilor's comments on social gatherings as a cause of increased infections in the West Midlands, adding, "We will not hesitate to take further action if necessary."

Meanwhile, the Liverpool metropolitan area has been added to the government's coronavirus watch list due to an increasing number of infections.

Kettering, Oadby, Wigston and Luton were removed from the watchlist after transmission decreased in these regions. Leeds also avoided further Covid-19 restrictions, as it was announced that the city will instead receive increased support in dealing with the surge in infection rates.

Elsewhere, in Lanarkshire, Scotland, lockdown measures have been tightened due to a surge in local coronavirus cases. Restrictions on visiting other households will apply in both North and South Lanarkshire parishes as of Saturday.

The move comes after 205 positive cases were found in the region last week.

The restrictions, which will be reviewed in seven days, are the same as those currently in place in Glasgow City, East Renfrewshire, Renfrewshire, East Dunbartonshire and West Dunbartonshire.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: “It is clearly unfortunate that these restrictions need to be extended to people living in Lanarkshire.

"I understand that this will not be welcome news for the people of these areas, especially before the weekend, but we must act now to protect the people and gain more control over the virus in the area."

Save our children's Christmas! The Covid survey shows that Brits want children under the age of 12 to be exempted from the draconian rule of six – as Tory backbenchers are a wild "grotesque" restriction

Voters and Tory MPs called on Boris Johnson last night to save Christmas by exempting children from his “rule of six”.

A Daily Mail poll found that more than four in ten are in favor of a policy turnaround and grandparents letting their families see their families over the Christmas season. Tory Backbencher devastated the "grotesque" restriction that bans groups of seven or more as of Monday in an attempt to stop a second wave of coronavirus.

Such gatherings are also prohibited in Scotland and Wales – children under the age of 12 are exempt. Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Tory Backbenchers Committee, urged Mr. Johnson to follow suit.

Tim Loughton, a former child minister, said the rule was unsustainable.

Downing Street refuses to withdraw, although young children are much less likely to catch or spread Covid-19. Officials said an age threshold would make enforcement too difficult for police officers.

The mail revealed yesterday that the rule was introduced one after the other in the cabinet. On Thursday, Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon said that those under 12 would be exempted from their version of the rule of six north of the border.

A new Daily Mail poll showed that the public has lost confidence in Boris Johnson's government and only Rishi Sunak has a positive approval rating

A new Daily Mail poll showed that the public has lost confidence in Boris Johnson's government and only Rishi Sunak has a positive approval rating

Boris Johnson is determined to enforce his policies that will jeopardize the Christmas party in England

Boris Johnson is determined to enforce his policies that will jeopardize the Christmas party in England

The dispute intensified yesterday when Mark Drakeford, the first minister of Wales, said he would do the same.

He told BBC Breakfast, "We have decided that it is not proportionate to include young children who are not susceptible to coronavirus or to spread it as adults are. Therefore, we are not including them."

But Downing Street said, “We reviewed all of the evidence prior to the decision made on Wednesday and decided to move on to a rule of six that applies to all ages.

“We made sure the rules were simplified and strengthened to make them easier to understand. Social distancing measures can only be effective if the public understands and adheres to them. "

Sir Graham said it was useful to exclude young children and would help families argue about which relatives to see over Christmas.

He added, "These are the issues that are raised in a parliamentary debate and they show why it is wrong for the government to set rules in an arbitrary manner without parliamentary scrutiny."

The poll found that 41 percent of voters say the Prime Minister should exempt teenagers, compared with 32 percent who disagree. It also shows that a third of families disrupted their Christmas plans by the rule of six.

Three quarters believe that most people will ignore the limit anyway.

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