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Workers BOARD the statue of Kenotaph and Winston Churchill to protect them


The workers climbed the statue of Cenotaph and Winston Churchill last night to protect them from damage before another weekend of protest in the capital.

Late Thursday evening, scaffolds formed around Churchill's statue in Parliament Square and the nearby cenotaph after fears that they would be attacked again by Black Lives Matter activists.

The British war leader's fight against the Nazis was covered in graffiti that said Churchill was a racist, and in another incident an activist tried to set fire to a union flag on the cenotaph that commemorates the country's dead the First World War.

It comes from fear of a clash between Black Lives Matters activists and far-right thugs who vowed to come into town on the weekend to protect the statues.

The covering British historical monuments outraged Tory MPs last night. Jacob Young MP from Redcar said on Twitter that it was "so sad that the rioters cannot be trusted not to attack the cenotaph, so much that they now feel the need to enter it".

And Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford said it was a "sad day" for London that the cenotaph had to be nailed up and that "those who want to attack this symbol of freedom and freedom are profoundly ashamed".

The protests – triggered by the murder of George Floyd by US police officers – have sparked a discussion of Britain's imperial past and historical figures related to slavery and racism.

Last Sunday, activists demolished the 17th-century statue of slave trader Edward Colston before throwing him into the city's port.

This action was repeated across the country with the removal of a number of monuments and statues, and London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who promised the capital's landmarks, would be reviewed by a commission to ensure that they reflect diversity.

A spokesman for the Mayor of London said: “The statue of Winston Churchill in Parliament Square is temporarily covered for protection.

"The vast majority of the protests were peaceful, but after the recent damage, the GLA City Operations Unit decided to cover them."

On Thursday evening, a Bristol high-rise sign with the name of a slave trader was removed. It is the latest in a series of monuments and statues that have been demolished across the country.

On Thursday, Guy and St. Thomas' hospitals in London announced that two statues of their namesakes would be removed from the public due to their connections to the slave trade.

The workers erected a scaffolding and started climbing into the Winston Churchill statue on Thursday evening before further protests were expected in the capital over the weekend

The statue of Churchill in Westminster on Thursday evening. Churchill was a target for graffiti at the protests last weekend and was littered with graffiti that said he was "racist".

The statue of Churchill in Westminster on Thursday evening. Churchill was a target for graffiti at the protests last weekend and was littered with graffiti that said he was "racist".

Workers in Parliament Square are building scaffolding to protect the statue of Winston Churchill on Thursday evening

Workers in Parliament Square are building scaffolding to protect the statue of Winston Churchill on Thursday evening

The Winston Churchill statue deep in the heart of Westminster is boarded up on Thursday evening ahead of the expected weekend protests

The Winston Churchill statue deep in the heart of Westminster is boarded up on Thursday evening ahead of the expected weekend protests

The cenotaph, which was built after the end of the First World War, is also protected by workers who set up a protective barrier on Thursday evening

The cenotaph, which was built after the end of the First World War, is also protected by workers who set up a protective barrier on Thursday evening

The boards will be placed on the protective barrier of the cenotaph on Thursday evening. During protests last weekend, an activist tried to set the union flag on fire

The boards will be placed on the protective barrier of the cenotaph on Thursday evening. During protests last weekend, an activist tried to set the union flag on fire

In anticipation of the protests this weekend, workers are building a protective barrier around the cenotaph

In anticipation of the protests this weekend, workers are building a protective barrier around the cenotaph

The union flag is temporarily removed when workers start building the scaffolding to protect the monument

The union flag is temporarily removed when workers start building the scaffolding to protect the monument

Elsewhere, an online video showed men in protective helmets climbing the Colston Tower in Bristol city center and removing the controversial figure's name from the top of the skyscraper.

Hours earlier, Colston's statue was fished from Bristol Harbor after being demolished and thrown into the water during an anti-racism demonstration on Sunday.

Meanwhile, the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council has postponed plans to temporarily remove a statue of the scout founder Robert Baden-Powell after angry residents vowed to fight for their protection.

The council originally announced it would move the statue from Poole Quay on Thursday due to concerns that it was on a target list drawn up by anti-racism activists.

Activists have focused on Lord Baden-Powell due to his ties to the Nazis and the Hitler Youth Program, as well as his military actions.

Awaiting further protests, scaffolding around the George Washington statue in Trafalgar Square, London, is boarding

Awaiting further protests, scaffolding around the George Washington statue in Trafalgar Square, London, is boarding

A statue of James II is boarded up in Trafalgar Square, London, after a series of protests against Black Lives Matter across the UK over the weekend

A statue of James II is boarded up in Trafalgar Square, London, after a series of protests against Black Lives Matter across the UK over the weekend

The statue can be seen on a website that lists more than 60 statues and monuments across the UK, which they claim should be removed for "celebrating slavery and racism".

In a statement issued on Thursday afternoon, the council said the listing "put the popular statue at risk of damage or even destruction."

He added: "We know that the locals are proud of the connections between Lord Baden-Powell and the Boy Scout movement to Poole and that some people feel we are giving in to the demonstrators by temporarily removing the statue.

"However, we feel responsible to protect it so that future generations can enjoy and respect it."

The council said the statue would not be removed because its "foundations are deeper than originally intended" and discussions were held with contractors on how to move it safely.

24-hour security is in place "until it is either removed or the threat subsides," the council said.

After protests against George Floyd's death and racial injustices, authorities across the country are under pressure to review controversial monuments.

On Thursday, the internationally renowned Guy and St. Thomas hospitals in London announced that they would remove the statue of their slave trade founder, Thomas Guy, from Black Lives Matter under pressure from the demonstrators.

Today's hospital confidence announced on Twitter that the controversial memorial will next be in a series of statues that have been mined through links to Britain's historic slave trade.

The bookseller Guy made his fortune as a major shareholder in the British slave trading company South Sea Company. He sold his shares for £ 250.00 – or £ 400m in modern prices – and founded Guy & # 39; s Hospital near London Bridge in 1721.

A second statue of Robert Clayton is removed from St. Thomas Hospital near Westminster Bridge, where Boris Johnson was shot with the coronavirus in April. Clayton was part of the Royal African Company, which shipped African slaves to America. The hospitals are both part of the same trust.

In a joint statement by the Trust, Guy & # 39; s and St Thomas & # 39; s Charity and King & # 39; s College London, it said: "Like many organizations in the UK, we know that we have a duty to inherit from Address colonialism, racism and slavery in our work.

“We absolutely recognize the public harm and anger that are created by the symbolism of public statues of historical figures that are in some way related to the slave trade.

The internationally known Guy & # 39; s and St. Thomas & # 39; Hospital in London will remove the statue of its slave trade founder Thomas Guy (image)

A crane hovered over the statue of founder Thomas Guy tonight

The internationally famous Guy & # 39; s and St Thomas & # 39; Hospital in London will remove the statue of its slave trade founder Thomas Guy (picture). Right: A crane hovered over the statue tonight

“We see the ubiquitous and harmful effects of structural racism through our work every day. Black people have poorer health outcomes, and this inequality is one of many ways racism permeates our society.

& # 39; We have therefore decided to remove statues of Robert Clayton and Thomas Guy from the public and look forward to working with the Mayor of London Commission in every respect and receiving guidance.

"We are fully committed to combating racism, discrimination and inequality and are in solidarity with our patients, students, colleagues and communities."

Robert Clayton was part of the Royal African Company, which shipped African slaves to America. His statue can also be seen in St. Thomas Hospital

Robert Clayton was part of the Royal African Company, which shipped African slaves to America. His statue can also be seen in St. Thomas Hospital

The hospital announced that the controversial statue of Thomas Guy would be removed from view under pressure from anti-racist protesters

The hospital announced that the controversial statue of Thomas Guy would be removed from view under pressure from anti-racist protesters

The bookseller Guy made his fortune by holding shares in the British slave trading company South Sea Company

Robert Clayton was part of the Royal African Company, which shipped African slaves to America

Bookseller Guy (left) made his fortune by owning shares in the British slave trading company South Sea Company. Robert Clayton (right) was part of the Royal African Company, which shipped African slaves to America.

St. Thomas & # 39; Hospital in London (pictured) today revealed on Twitter that the controversial monument that represents its founder is the next in a series of statues that have been mined through links to the slave trade

St. Thomas & # 39; Hospital in London (pictured) today revealed on Twitter that the controversial monument that represents its founder is the next in a series of statues dismantled via links to the slave trade

Who was Thomas Guy?

Thomas Guy (1644-1724) was a British bookseller, stock speculator, governor of St. Thomas & # 39; Hospital and founder of the Guys & # 39; Hospital in London, which he built with profits from the slave trade.

He made his fortune by owning shares in the South Sea Company worth £ 42,000, the main purpose of which was to sell slaves to the Spanish colonies.

Between 1715 and 1731, the South Sea Company was responsible for the transport of around 64,000 enslaved Africans to Spanish plantations in Central and South America.

After selling his stake in the South Sea Company for £ 250,000, or £ 400m at today's prices, Guy used his enormous fortune to help Guy & # 39; s Hospital serve the "poorest and sick of the poor" in London to build at a cost of £ 19,000.

Before opening Guy & # 39; s in Southwark in central London, he founded poor houses and became governor of the nearby St. Thomas & # 39; s Hospital after paying for three new wards.

He died in 1724 and his will was so complex and valuable that Parliament's law was required to enact it, and he donated nearly £ 220,000 to the hospital.

The bulk of his estate was left with confidence to complete the work on the hospital, while another amount was earmarked for the release of prisoners in the capital who owed debts.

It is because street names and graves were being hushed up and plaques torn across the UK today when British, inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, took matters into their own hands for local ties and clues to the history of the slave trade eliminate in the nation.

A statue of Admiral Lord Nelson was sprayed with paint at Deptford City Hall in southeast London, while the tombstone of music singer GH Elliott, who sang in black letters, was covered up in Rottingdean, East Sussex.

Meanwhile, residents of Colston Road in Bristol have taped their street sign and put a suggestion box for new names underneath, four days after a statue of slave trader Edward Colston was toppled in the city.

Elsewhere, the heads of the National Trust said they were reviewing a statue of a kneeling African figure dressed in leaves with the sundial over his head standing in front of Dunham Massey Hall in Altrincham, Greater Manchester.

And in South Wales, a memorial plaque in honor of 17th century slave trader Captain Thomas Phillips was removed in Brecon by an unknown person. The Council indicated that it had been reviewed at that time.

Numerous statues and monuments have been removed and public buildings, pubs, and streets have been renamed after days of protests against Black Lives Matter since Black George Floyd died in police custody in Minnesota on May 25.

Activists linked to the anti-racism movement have called for the overthrow of 92 statues, streets, or other monuments that they believe are racist. A complete list is compiled on the website www.toppletheracists.org.

The Nelson statue in Deptford City Hall today had red streaks on both sides. Protesters targeted the marine hero claiming that he was a white supremacist and against abolishing slavery.

This week also saw:

  • A plaque commemorating 17th century merchant Captain Thomas Phillips was removed from Brecon in South Wales.
  • The statue of Edward Colston, which was toppled on Sunday and launched the campaign, was pulled from the port of Bristol.
  • Oxford University Chancellor Prof. Louise Richardson has claimed that Nelson Mandela had not found a "simplified solution to a complex problem" like removing Cecil Rhodes' statue from Oriel College.
  • ITV Saturday Night Takeaway's latest TV show is removed, and presenters Ant and Dec apologize for pretending to be colored people if the footage of these sketches is removed.
  • In America, Donald Trump has refused to rename Confederation-based army bases because the Richmond & Virginia statues are torn down overnight by Jefferson Davis – the former Confederation President
This morning a paint-splattered statue of Horatio Nelson is pictured in Deptford City Hall in southeast London

The Nelson statue in Deptford town hall

This morning a paint-splattered statue of Horatio Nelson is pictured in Deptford City Hall in southeast London

The residents of Colston Road in Bristol taped up their sign and today put a suggestion box for new names underneath

The residents of Colston Road in Bristol taped up their sign and today put a suggestion box for new names underneath

The Nelson statue in Deptford can be seen before the color attack

The Bristol street sign can be seen before it is covered

The Nelson statue in Deptford can be seen before paint was thrown on it (left), while the street sign in Bristol can be seen before it is covered (right).

The gravestone of the music hall singer GH Elliott was covered up in front of St. Margaret & # 39; s Church in Rottingdean, East Sussex

The gravestone of the music hall singer GH Elliott was covered up in front of St. Margaret & # 39; s Church in Rottingdean, East Sussex

The National Trust chiefs said they were reviewing a statue of a kneeling African figure dressed in leaves with the sundial over his head standing in front of Dunham Massey Hall in Altrincham, Greater Manchester (file picture).

The National Trust chiefs said they were reviewing a statue of a kneeling African figure dressed in leaves with the sundial over his head standing in front of Dunham Massey Hall in Altrincham, Greater Manchester (file picture).

The grave of GH Elliott, which appeared in black letters, was covered up in Sussex. He appeared on stage in the early 1900s under the role of & # 39; Chocolate Colored C ** n & # 39; on – today an extremely offensive racial fraud.

Meanwhile, Harry Enfield sparked outrage when he mentioned the actor's controversial stage name live on BBC Radio 4 today while defending his own use of Blackface after posing as Nelson Mandela on his sketch show.

The comic's comments came after Ant and Dec apologized for using Blackface during a section on Saturday night. Little Britain was also removed from the BBC iPlayer due to the use of Blackface in some sketches.

A "hit list" of statues and monuments for some of Britain's most famous figures was created by an anti-racism group

A "hit list" of statues and monuments for some of Britain's most famous figures was created by an anti-racism group

The statue of Edward Colston is pulled out of the harbor by the Bristol City Council today after being rolled up on Sunday

The statue of Edward Colston is pulled out of the harbor by the Bristol City Council today after being rolled up on Sunday

Last week, comedian Leigh Francis tearfully apologized for portraying black celebrities on the Bo & # 39; Selecta sketch show. Netflix has also attracted The Mighty Boosh and League Of Gentleman because of their use of Blackface.

The 78 "racist" statues of the BLM supporters want to be destroyed

  1. Lord Kitchener, Orkney
  2. Duke of Sutherland, Golspie
  3. Jim Crow, Dunoon
  4. Henry Dundas, Comrie
  5. George Kinloch, Dundee
  6. Henry Dundas, Edinburgh
  7. Lord Roberts, Glasgow
  8. Thomas Carlyle, Glasgow
  9. Sir Robert Peel, Glasgow
  10. Colin Campbell, Glasgow
  11. John Moore, Glasgow
  12. James George Smith Neill, Ayr
  13. William Armstrong, Newcastle
  14. Captain James Cook, Great Ayton
  15. Robert Peel, Bradford
  16. Robert Peel, Leeds
  17. Robert Peel, Preston
  18. Robert Peel, buried
  19. Robert Peel, Manchester
  20. Bryan Blundell, Liverpool
  21. Christopher Columbus, Liverpool
  22. Martins Bank, Liverpool
  23. Admiral Nelson, Liverpool
  24. William Ewart Gladstone, Liverpool
  25. Banastre Tarleton, Liverpool
  26. William Leverhulme, Wirral
  27. Henry Morton Stanley, St. Asaph
  28. Henry Morton Stanley, Denbigh
  29. William Gladstone, Hawarden
  30. Elihu Yale, Wrexham
  31. Green man, Ashbourne
  32. The black boy, Retford
  33. Robert Clive, Shropshire
  34. Robert Peel, Tamworth
  35. Robert Peel, Birmingham
  36. Ronald A Fisher, Cambridge
  37. Cecil Rhodes, Bishops Stortford
  38. Admiral Nelson, Norwich
  39. Admiral Nelson, Great Yarmouth
  40. Thomas Phillips, Brecon
  41. General Nott, Carmarthen
  42. Thomas Picton, Carmarthen
  43. Henry Austin Bruce, Cardiff
  44. Thomas Picton, Cardiff
  45. De la Beche family, Swansea
  46. Codrington Library, Oxford
  47. Cecil Rhodes, Oxford
  48. Edward Colston (School 1), Bristol
  49. Edward Colston (School 2), Bristol
  50. Edward Colston (statue), Bristol
  51. Edward Colston (tower), Bristol
  52. Edward Colston (Hall), Bristol
  53. George Alfred Wills, Bristol
  54. Merchant Venturers Building, Bristol
  55. William Beckford, London
  56. Robert Geffrye, London
  57. Francis Galton, London
  58. King Charles II, London
  59. King James II, London
  60. Robert Clive, London
  61. Oliver Cromwell, London
  62. Robert Clayton, London
  63. Henry De la Beche, London
  64. Christopher Columbus, London
  65. Thomas Guy (1/2), London
  66. Thomas Guy (2/2), London
  67. Robert Milligan, London
  68. Francis Drake, London
  69. Robert Blake, London
  70. Admiral Nelson, London
  71. Captain Edward August Lendy, London
  72. East India Estate, London
  73. Stephen Clark, London
  74. Charles James Napier, London
  75. Earl Mountbatten, London
  76. Jan Smuts, London
  77. Admiral Horatio Nelson, London
  78. William Lever, London
  79. Edward Colston, London
  80. Lord Kitchener, Chatham
  81. Edward Codrington, Brighton
  82. William Ewart Gladstone, Brighton
  83. George Somers, Lyme Regis
  84. Drax family, Wareham
  85. Robert Baden-Powell, Poole
  86. Redvers Buller, Exeter
  87. John Colleton, Exmouth
  88. William Beckford, Salisbury
  89. Francis Drake, Tavistock
  90. Walter Raleigh, Bodmin
  91. Nancy Astor, Plymouth
  92. Francis Drake, Plymouth

In Bristol, residents who are "embarrassed" by the connection of their road to Colston have revived a campaign to rename it.

Blue tape was placed over the Colston Road sign in Easton, and a suggestion box was installed below to ask for new name ideas.

The residents initially expressed concerns in 2018 when former city councilor Abdul Malik wrote a petition calling for a name change.

Malik, a businessman who also chairs the Easton Jamia Mosque, has lived his entire life on Colston Road and says he continues to support the campaign.

He said: “Bristol is a city of inclusion – a city that provides refuge to refugees and asylum seekers.

& # 39; (But) as you drive through Bristol, it's pretty embarrassing to see places like Blackboy Hill and Whiteladies Road and Colston being celebrated.

“Times have changed, and what was considered acceptable and normal at a time cannot be considered acceptable at that time.

"Easton is diverse and inclusive, and I think it makes sense to rename this particular path something that includes it and not Mr. Colston."

He said residents were divided in 2018 and there was not much support for the petition, but he now thought it was "a good time to start the conversation."

But he admitted that going through the name change process could be "quite a nightmare", which would require the collaboration of the Bristol City Council.

Most authorities also charge hundreds of pounds to rename a street and put up new signs.

Big Jeff Boulevard, Massive Attack Mile, and Streety McStreetface Street were among the ideas posted online when a photo of the suggestion box was posted on Reddit this week.

The more thoughtful Stephenson Road was also thrown into the hat and probably referred to civil rights activist Paul Stephenson.

Dan Stone, who lives on Colston Road and who installed the new suggestion box, said the discussions were still at an early stage, but about a dozen candidates have been proposed so far.

Auf die Frage, warum manche Leute wollten, dass es umbenannt wird, sagte er: „Wer möchte in einer Straße leben, die nach einem Sklavenhändler benannt ist? Dies ist ein multikulturelles Gebiet, das gefällt uns. Es (den Sklavenhandel) wollen wir nicht feiern. '

Die Statue von Colston, die während einer Demonstration gegen Rassismus in Bristol gestürzt wurde, wurde aus dem Hafen der Stadt gehoben, nachdem sie von Demonstranten ins Wasser gerollt worden war.

Der Stadtrat von Bristol hat auf Twitter einen Videoclip der Statue gepostet, die heute Morgen aus dem Wasser gefischt wird.

Es wurde getwittert: „Heute früh haben wir die Statue von Colston aus dem Hafen von Bristol geholt. Es wird an einen sicheren Ort gebracht, bevor es später Teil unserer Museumssammlung wird. '

Der Bürgermeister von Bristol, Marvin Rees, hatte zuvor bestätigt, dass die Statue neben Plakaten des Protestes gegen Black Lives Matter in einem Museum ausgestellt werden würde.

Eine Entscheidung darüber, wie der leere Sockel der Statue verwendet wird, werde durch demokratische Konsultation getroffen, sagte er. Die Statue wurde am Sonntag unter weltweiten Protesten abgerissen, die durch den Tod von George Floyd ausgelöst wurden.

Die Bergung der Statue erfolgt, nachdem ein hochrangiger Labour-Abgeordneter sagte, ihre erzwungene Entfernung sei das Ergebnis jahrelanger Frustration über den demokratischen Prozess.

Lisa Nandy, Außenministerin von ITV, sprach gestern über Peston von ITV und sagte, die Menschen hätten beschlossen, Maßnahmen gegen das Denkmal zu ergreifen, weil sie das Gefühl hatten, dass ihre Stimmen zu Rassenfragen nicht gehört würden.

Sie sagte: „Warum wurde diese Statue so entfernt, wie sie entfernt wurde?

„Weil Demonstranten und Aktivisten 20 Jahre lang jeden ihnen zur Verfügung stehenden demokratischen Hebel, Petitionen, Treffen, Proteste benutzt hatten, um gewählte Politiker zum Handeln zu bewegen, und sie konnten keinen Konsens erzielen und nichts erreichen.

„Dies spiegelt nun wider, was den Farbigen in diesem Land und auf der ganzen Welt seit langer Zeit widerfahren ist. Wir haben allein in den letzten drei Jahren sieben Überprüfungen der Rassendiskriminierung in diesem Land durchgeführt, und nur sehr wenige dieser Empfehlungen wurden umgesetzt.

"Deshalb sind die Menschen so frustriert, und das ist die Frage, die wir uns stellen sollten. Warum ist es für so viele Menschen so schwierig, tatsächlich gehört zu werden und die demokratischen Führer dazu zu bewegen, den demokratischen Wandel zu erreichen, den sie brauchen?"

Was die Statue in Dunham Massey betrifft, schrieb eine Frau namens Naomi Bea auf der Facebook-Seite des National Trust des Herrenhauses und fügte ein Bild der Statue hinzu.

Sie sagte: „Hallo, mit den jüngsten Ereignissen ist dieses Bild in Ihrem Gelände ans Licht gekommen. Ich habe mich gefragt, ob Sie die gleiche Initiative wie London ergreifen, indem Sie Ihre offensiven Statuen in National Trust-Räumen überprüfen. Vielen Dank.'

Als Antwort schrieb Dunham Massey National Trust: „Hallo Naomi, danke, dass Sie sich darüber in Verbindung gesetzt haben. Der National Trust kümmert sich um Orte und Sammlungen, die in vielerlei Hinsicht mit der Weltgeschichte verbunden sind, einschließlich der Hinterlassenschaften des Kolonialismus und der Sklaverei.

Die Rover-Scouts Chris Arthur (links) und Matthew Trott posieren heute vor einer Statue von Lord Baden-Powell in Poole in Dorset

Die Rover-Scouts Chris Arthur (links) und Matthew Trott posieren heute vor einer Statue von Lord Baden-Powell in Poole in Dorset

„Wir haben noch einen langen Weg vor uns, aber wir arbeiten daran, die oft schmerzhaften und herausfordernden Geschichten, die mit unseren Orten und Sammlungen verbunden sind, durch Interpretation und Erforschung anzugehen. In Bezug auf diese Statue prüfen wir sie derzeit und sollten Ihnen in Kürze weitere Informationen geben können.

Sir Thomas Picton's descendant says he's 'embarrassed' by his links to slave-killing 'Tyrant of Trinidad' and Cardiff statue should come down

Descendants of British historical figures were today split over whether statues and memorials to be removed from UK town centres over their links to slavery.

A relative of Waterloo hero Sir Thomas Picton has called for his statue to be removed and put into a museum, saying he was 'rather embarrassed' to be a descendant.

But those with family links to Admiral Lord Nelson, Robert Clive and Henry Dundas have all hit back against calls for monuments of their descendants to be taken down.

Public buildings, pubs and streets are also facing being renamed after days of Black Lives Matter protests over the death of George Floyd in Minnesota on May 25.

Picton descendant Aled Thomas, 28, is the nine-times great grandfather of the Napoleonic Wars hero who was also known as the 'Tyrant of Trinidad'.

A marble statue of Picton stands in Cardiff City Hall, but Mr Thomas has written to council leaders to join calls led by the city's Lord Mayor for it to be taken down.

Picton was the highest-ranking British officer killed at Waterloo after the Duke of Wellington called him 'a rough foul-mouthed devil' but 'very capable'.

His statue has stood in the Welsh capital for more than 100 years even though he was involved in the trade and executed dozens of slaves during his time as Governor of Trinidad, and authorised the torture of a 14-year-old girl.

In a letter to the council, Mr Thomas said: 'While I am related to the Picton family, I do not defend the cruelty that Sir Thomas Picton caused.

'In fact, I feel rather embarrassed to admit I am related to him. We cannot help where we are from and who we are descended from. Also, we cannot change what has happened in the past. But what we can do is learn from them.'

'We recognise the need to explore the contested stories behind places. It is crucial we do it in a high-quality, properly researched way, and in a way that is respectful and sensitive.

'We have no wish to remain silent on this and are grateful to you for sharing your views.'

Ms Bea added: 'Thank you for your response. I appreciate it is a delicate matter to remove these offensive and quite upsetting features, while still preserving history. This particular statue is deeply upsetting for some people.

'At least you are not dismissing the issue and working towards what is fair and respectful to others.'

The life-size lead statue was created by 18th century sculptor Andrew Carpenter as part of a series representing the world's continents.

In Dorset, local residents have vowed to fight to protect a statue of Robert Baden-Powell which is set to be removed temporarily for its protection after it was placed on a target list by protesters.

The statue of the founder of the Scout Movement in Poole Quay has been targeted by campaigners due to his associations with the Nazis and the Hitler youth programme, as well as his actions in the military.

Vikki Slade, leader of Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council, tweeted the decision to remove it was taken following a 'threat', adding: 'It's literally less than 3m from the sea so is at huge risk.'

A crowd of local residents gathered around the statue today, vowing to protect it and to stop the council from removing it.

Mark Howell, the local authority's deputy leader, said the statue would only be removed to protect it.

He added that this would be with the aim of it permanently remaining in its position overlooking Brownsea Island where Baden-Powell held his first experimental camp in 1907.

He said the final decision to temporarily take it down had not yet been made.

He said: 'We are considering whether we should remove it temporarily to protect the statue.

'In terms of its long-term future, this statue stays here, Baden-Powell did an enormous amount of good, he created an organisation that brought people from different religions, ethnic backgrounds and races together and we are very proud of that in Poole and our connection to him.

The next in line? BLM supporters have pinpointed a list of their next targets, but the most widely shared are  (top left to bottom right) 1) Lord Nelson – tried to stop abolition (Nelson's column) 2) Sir Thomas Picton 3) Thomas Guy - London, Guy's Hospital 4) Sir Robert Peel 5) Sir Francis Drake 6) William Beckford 7) Henry Dundas 8) Clive of India 9) John Cass 10) General Sir Redvers Buller 11) Lord Kitchener 12) Ronald Fisher 13) Lord Grey - Grey's Monument - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street 14) Oliver Cromwell – Statue - London, Houses of Parliament 15) Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue - Glasgow, George Square 16) William Ewart Gladstone 17) William Leverhulme – Statue - Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery 18) William Armstrong - Memorial - Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place 19) King James II – Statue - London, Trafalgar Square 20) General James George Smith Neill, Wellington Square, Ayr

The next in line? BLM supporters have pinpointed a list of their next targets, but the most widely shared are  (top left to bottom right) 1) Lord Nelson – tried to stop abolition (Nelson's column) 2) Sir Thomas Picton 3) Thomas Guy – London, Guy's Hospital 4) Sir Robert Peel 5) Sir Francis Drake 6) William Beckford 7) Henry Dundas 8) Clive of India 9) John Cass 10) General Sir Redvers Buller 11) Lord Kitchener 12) Ronald Fisher 13) Lord Grey – Grey's Monument – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Grainger Street 14) Oliver Cromwell – Statue – London, Houses of Parliament 15) Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde – Statue – Glasgow, George Square 16) William Ewart Gladstone 17) William Leverhulme – Statue – Wirral, outside Lady Lever Art Gallery 18) William Armstrong – Memorial – Newcastle Upon Tyne, Eldon Place 19) King James II – Statue – London, Trafalgar Square 20) General James George Smith Neill, Wellington Square, Ayr

'This has been an emergency reaction because the police have advised us the statue is on the target list being circulated by protesters. This is an artwork and if it was damaged it wouldn't be easily repaired. There is no controversy about it being here, it's the right place for it.'

The 130 Labour councils considering whether they should pull down imperialist statues

Majority Labour

Amber Valley. Barking and Dagenham. Barnsley. Barrow-in-Furness. Bassetlaw. Birmingham.  Blackburn with Darwen. Blackpool. Bradford. Brent. Bristol. Bury. Calderdale. Cambridge. Camden. Cardiff. Chesterfield. Chorley. Copeland. Corby. Coventry.  Crawley. Croydon. Doncaster. Durham. Ealing. Enfield. Exeter. Gateshead. Gedling. Gravesham.  Greenwich. Hackney. Halton. Hammersmith and Fulham. Haringey. Harlow. Harrow. Hastings. High Peak. Hounslow. Hyndburn. Ipswich. Islington. Kingston upon. Hull. Kirklees. Knowsley. Lambeth. Leeds. Leicester. Lewisham. Lincoln. Liverpool. Luton. Manchester. Merton. Neath. Port Talbot. Newcastle upon Tyne. Newham. Newport. North Tyneside. Norwich. Nottingham. Oldham. Oxford. Plymouth. Preston. Reading. Redbridge. Rhondda Cynon Taf.  Rochdale. Rossendale. Rotherham. Salford. Sandwell . Sefton.  Sheffield. Slough. South Tyneside. Southampton. Southwark.  St Helens. Stevenage. Sunderland. Swansea. Tameside. Telford and Wrekin. Tower Hamlets. Trafford. Wakefield. Waltham Forest.  Warrington. West Lancashire. Wigan. Wolverhampton.

Labour in coalition

Cannock Chase. Cheshire East. Cheshire West and Chester. Cumbria. Dumfries and Galloway. East Lothian. Flintshire. Inverclyde. Lancaster. Lewes. Mansfield. Midlothian. Milton Keynes. North Ayrshire. North Hertfordshire. North Lanarkshire. North Somerset  Nuneaton and Bedworth. Pembrokeshire. Pendle. Rother. Scarborough. South Ayrshire. Southend-on-Sea. Stirling. Stockport. Stockton-on-Tees. Stroud. Swale. Thanet. Vale of Glamorgan. Waverley West Lothian. Wirral. Wyre Forest.

The target list emerged following a raft of Black Lives Matter protests across the UK, sparked by the death of George Floyd while in police custody in the US city of Minneapolis last month.

Len Banister, 78, a former Scout, said of the Baden-Powell statue: 'He is the reason I am still here, the pleasure he gives to so many people, they shouldn't take it down, I will fight them off.'

Spencer Tuck, 35, said: 'Unfortunately he was in fascist times but there is more to it and this statue is nothing to do with racism, it's to do with the heritage of Poole.'

Sharon Warne, 53, suggested controversial statues should have information panels installed explaining the positive and negative points about the figures they depict.

She said: 'He had a bad past but he was the founder of the Scouts which today is a great organisation and it's ridiculous to get rid of him.'

Rover Scouts Matthew Trott and Christopher Arthur travelled from Cwmbran, Wales, to express their support for the statue.

Mr Trott, 28, said: 'I think the proposal to remove the statue is necessary to protect it at the moment given the circumstances. I'd rather see the statue placed in a box in a warehouse for the moment rather than at the bottom of the harbour.

'There have been vicious rumours of Baden-Powell but they are not true at all. He started the foundation I love, I have been a Scout my whole life since I was six, Scouting is my whole life so he is my hero.'

The Scouts said in a statement: 'We look forward to discussing this matter with Poole Council to make an informed decision on what happens next.

'Baden-Powell was the founder of the Scout movement. Currently there are over 54 million Scouts in the world and we operate in almost every nation on earth, promoting tolerance and global solidarity.

'The Scout movement is resolute in its commitment to inclusion and diversity and members continually reflect and challenge ourselves in how we live our values.'

George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25

White police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on Mr Floyd's neck in Minneapolis on May 25 for nine minutes

George Floyd (left), a 46-year-old black man, died after white police officer Derek Chauvin (right) put his knee on his neck in Minneapolis on May 25 for nine minutes

Meanwhile a university vice-chancellor has called for the controversial statue of colonialist Cecil Rhodes to be taken down from an Oxford college.

William Gladstone 'would not have stood in the way of statue removals'

A descendant of William Gladstone has suggested the former prime minister would not have stood in the way if there was 'democratic will' to remove statues of him.

Charlie Gladstone, great-great-grandson of the 19th century politician, issued a statement after an online petition called for Gladstone's Library in Hawarden, North Wales, to be renamed due to the family's links to the slave trade.

The petition, launched by Ciara Lamb, which has only gained just over 40 signatures, claims the name is a symbol of 'oppression' and changing it 'would be progress our community so desires'.

It argues that the name is a 'glorification' of a man whose 'family was one of the largest slave-owning families in the country'. In a statement, Charlie Gladstone, president of the library, said that 'at the core of our being' its staff 'believe that Black Lives Matter'.

The message posted on Facebook, which is also signed off by the library's warden, Peter Francis, continued: 'We also believe that if it is the democratic will, after due process, to remove statues of William Gladstone, our founder, we would not stand in the way.

'Nor, we think, would Gladstone himself – who worked tirelessly on behalf of democratic change. This is why we believe that what matters is how we live today, our values, our democratic process and political involvement.'

It comes after the University of Liverpool confirmed that a 'democratic process' will be used to select a new name for a hall named after William Gladstone, after students pointed out that he had defended the rights of owners of slave-run plantations, such as his father, John Gladstone.

Mr Francis and Mr Gladstone said the library is aware of John Gladstone's 'plantation-owning past', and has 'instituted a scholarship for research into historical and contemporary slavery'.

They said it is 'undeniable' that John Gladstone 'owned land in the West Indies and South America that used slave labour'.

While his father had received £106,769 in compensation at the time of the abolition of slavery, William Gladstone himself 'received nothing', the statement continued.

It added: 'Yes, in 1831 William did speak in the Commons in favour of compensation for slave owners. It was his first speech in the Commons and he was still in thrall to his father. By 1850, he was a changed man and in Parliament he described slavery as 'by far the foulest crime that taints the history of mankind in any Christian or pagan country'.'

Originally known as St Deiniol's, the library was founded in 1895 by William Gladstone who bequeathed it £40,000 when he died three years later.

Gladstone, born in Liverpool, was prime minister for 12 years across four terms between 1868 and 1894.

Baroness Valerie Amos, director of the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) in London, questioned why a statue of the imperialist was needed 'to have a conversation about history'.

Her comments came after a large demonstration was held outside Oriel College at the University of Oxford as part of a long-running campaign to demand the removal of the Cecil Rhodes statue.

Asked about the movement, Baroness Amos, who will become the first black head of an Oxford college later this year, told BBC Breakfast: 'We shouldn't airbrush history but I don't think you need a statue of Cecil Rhodes to help you to have a conversation about that history. I would take it down.

'This is a man who was a white supremacist, an imperialist. He founded a company that made money through slave labour in the mines, and you're telling me that we have to put up a statue of this person, glorify their memory, to have a conversation about our history?'

Her comments came after the vice-chancellor of the University of Oxford said she was 'delighted' to see students engage in debate around the Black Lives Matter movement.

Professor Louise Richardson said universities should face questions about who they accept money from, but she described the issues as 'complex' and said they are likely to be debated for decades to come.

Prof Richardson said the university has 'benefited enormously' from having the Rhodes scholarship – which is a programme, run by the Rhodes Trust, that allows graduates from around the world to study at Oxford.

Earlier this week, governors at Oriel College said the institution 'abhors racism and discrimination in all its forms' but that the college continues to 'debate and discuss' the presence of the Rhodes statue.

On Tuesday, demonstrators called for the college to remove the statue from the High Street entrance of the building, as well as protesting against racism following the death of George Floyd in the US.

Speaking on the BBC, Baroness Amos, who will become Master of University College in Oxford in August, said: 'So many of those young people say they don't understand, have not been told about that history.

'They feel an affront, as I do, having to walk past those statues day after day after day.

'Why are we glorifying people who made their money from the slave trade? Why are we glorifying people whose brutality and violence contributed to them making money?

'Why are we not, as a country, talking about how the slave trade helped us to grow and develop and become an important world power? Why aren't we talking about that and how that past has informed our present and will inform our future?'

She added: 'The Rhodes Trust doesn't need a statue to do good work. A statue is a memorial. It is a symbol of something. And we say that our country is about values – those are not the values that we should be promoting.'

Splendour from slavery: From sprawling Brodsworth Estate to historic Ham Green House… the country retreats built on the back of centuries-old forced labour

By JACK ELSOM FOR MAILONLINE

Sprawling across acres of estate, Britain's grand country houses attract millions of tourists each year eager to gain a glimpse of how the landed classes used to live.

But magnificent exteriors and rooms stuffed with riches often masks the murky history of the buildings and the people who owned them.

Many of the UK's country residences were owned by or built for slave-owners or people profiting from colonial trade.

Some of the houses do not gloss over their foundations, but many of the tourists who pour in through their doors will likely leave unaware of the building's ties with slavery.

Following the recent Black Lives Matter protests, a debate has exploded over whether statues of controversial figures should stand or fall.

Nearly a decade ago, historians contributed to a Historic England project which examined the links of country houses to slavery.

The National Trust and English Heritage, which manages many of these houses, have both committed to giving visitors a rounded grounding in their history.

Below are some of the houses with historic links to the slave trade:

Brodsworth Hall, South Yorkshire

Owner: English Heritage

The stunning Brodsworth Hall in South Yorkshire is a jewel in English Heritage's portfolio of old country houses.

The existing Victorian building was erected in 1861 for Charles Sabine Thellusson, but the original estate was constructed in 1791 for merchant Peter Thellusson.

Thellusson's family were originally financiers in Switzerland, but he moved to England in 1760 to oversee the family's banks.

This role saw him provide loans to slave ship and plantation owners. As these slave owners defaulted on debts, Thellusson amassed interests in Caribbean plantations, according to the English Heritage website.

In 1790, just before Brodsworth Estate was built, he married the daughter of Antigua slave owner Sir Christopher Bethell-Codrington.

The Thellussons continued to own slaves in Grenada and Monsterrat until 1820.

The existing Victorian building of Brodsworth Hall was erected in 1861 for Charles Sabine Thellusson, but the original estate was constructed in 1791 for merchant Peter Thellusson

The existing Victorian building of Brodsworth Hall was erected in 1861 for Charles Sabine Thellusson, but the original estate was constructed in 1791 for merchant Peter Thellusson

Ashton Court, Bristol

Owner: Bristol City Council

Ashton Court was until the 1950s owned by the Smyth family, which lived on the estate since it was purchased in 1545 by John Smyth, the former sheriff and mayor of Bristol.

Some historians reckon the Smythss involvement with the slave trade was as early as the 1630s, before Bristol became a focal point of colonial trade.

Jarrit Smyth, MP for Bristol in the mid 1700s was a member of the Bristol Society of Merchant Venturers – the elite body which actively lobbied on behalf of Bristol participants in the African, American and West Indian trades.

The renovation of the house into the grand palatial home which stands today came about after the marriage of John Hugh Smyth to Rebecca Woolnough, the Jamaican heiress.

A £40,000 marriage settlement included a portfolio of properties in both England and Jamaica, such as the Spring sugar plantation.

From the sale of sugar at these plantations, John Hugh raked in over £17,000 between 1762-1802, according to experts.

Ashton Court was until the 1950s owned by the Smyth family, which has owned the estate since it was purchased by 1545 by John Smyth, the former sheriff and mayor of Bristol

Ashton Court was until the 1950s owned by the Smyth family, which has owned the estate since it was purchased by 1545 by John Smyth, the former sheriff and mayor of Bristol

Some historians reckon the Smythss involvement with the slave trade was as early as the 1630s, before even Bristol became a focal point of colonial trade

Some historians reckon the Smythss involvement with the slave trade was as early as the 1630s, before even Bristol became a focal point of colonial trade

Northington Grange, Hampshire

Owner: English Heritage

The magnificent Grange at Northington, built in the mid 1660s, is a symbol of Greek revivalism in England and resembles an Athenian temple.

Throughout much of its history, the house has been owned by two political dynasties – the Drummonds and Barings – which historians from Historic England say root the Grange in 'significant social and economic connections to Atlantic slavery'.

While the Drummonds, who purchased the Grange in 1787, and Barings, who owned the house from 1817, did not directly own slaves, the historians claim much of their wealth derived from slavery, because some of their banking clients were slave owners.

Caribbean plantation owners held accounts with Drummonds bank and Henry Drummond was Paymaster to the armed forces in North America and the Caribbean.

As an MP, Alexander Baring was an advocate for the free trade of cotton and sugar – then harvested by slaves on plantations – and he also opposed the immediate abolition of slavery in the British Empire.

Much of Alexander's wealth was also sourced through his marriage into the Bingham family who had gained substantially through trade with the French Caribbean colony, Martinique.

As a partner of Baring Brothers bank, Alexander also profited from the expansion of slavery across the American South through funding of the Louisiana Purchase in 1802.

The magnificent Grange at Northington, built in the mid 1660s, is a symbol of Greek revivalism in England and is likened to a Athenian temple

The magnificent Grange at Northington, built in the mid 1660s, is a symbol of Greek revivalism in England and is likened to a Athenian temple

Leigh Court, Abbots Leigh, Bristol

Owner: Events venue

Now a conference centre and wedding venue, the Palladian mansion was originally built in 1814 for Philip John Miles.

Miles inherited his father Williams Caribbean plantations to become Bristol first sugar millionaire and largest West India merchant, according to Historic England academics.

Hundreds of Africans were enslaved at plantations, including the ones at Vallay and Rhodes Hall, according to family business papers in the mid 1700s.

Slave Compensation Records also show Miles claimed over £36,000 for the 1,700 African slaves at plantations in Jamaica and Trinidad in 1830s.

Now a conference centre and wedding venue, the Palladian mansion was originally built in 1814 for Philip John Miles

Now a conference centre and wedding venue, the Palladian mansion was originally built in 1814 for Philip John Miles

Marble Hill House, Twickenham

Owner: English Heritage

This sprawling Palladian home, set in 66 acres of land, was built in 1724 for Henrietta Howard, the Countess of Suffolk.

It is described by the English Heritage as the 'last complete survivor of the elegant villas and gardens which bordered the Thames between Richmond and Hampton Court in the 18th century'.

Howard was a notorious mistress of King George II when he was Prince of Wales, and received a windfall from the Crown when she left the court in 1722.

The bulk of this settlement was £11,500 of stock, of which over two-thirds were shares in the South Sea Company, according to Historic England research.

South Sea Company was heavily involved in the trans-Atlantic slave trade, which historians say 'was therefore crucial in funding both the acquisition of the land and the building of Marble Hill House.'

Later owners of the house also had strong links to the slave trade, and the use of mahogany material for the interior, including the grand staircase, was being harvested by slaves during the 1720s.

This sprawling Palladian home, set in 66 acres of land, was built in 1724 for Henrietta Howard, the Countess of Suffolk

This sprawling Palladian home, set in 66 acres of land, was built in 1724 for Henrietta Howard, the Countess of Suffolk

It is described by the English Heritage as the 'last complete survivor of the elegant villas and gardens which bordered the Thames between Richmond and Hampton Court in the 18th century'

It is described by the English Heritage as the 'last complete survivor of the elegant villas and gardens which bordered the Thames between Richmond and Hampton Court in the 18th century'

Ham Green House, Bristol

Owner: Penny Brohn Cancer Care Centre

The home was originally built in the early 18th century by West Indian slave trader Richard Meyler before being passed through marriage to Bristol MP Henry Bright, who opposed the emancipation of slaves.

His son, Richard Bright continued his father's business in Jamaica and owned the Meylersfield, Beeston Spring and Garredu plantations.

In 1818 the plantations were given to his younger son Robert, who profited from slave compensation.

Ham House still has a mooring for the Bright ships which voyaged regularly to the West Indies, according to researchers.

The home was originally built in the early 18th century by West Indian slave trader Richard Meyler before being passed through marriage to Bristol MP Henry Bright, who opposed the emancipation of slaves

The home was originally built in the early 18th century by West Indian slave trader Richard Meyler before being passed through marriage to Bristol MP Henry Bright, who opposed the emancipation of slaves

Clevedon Court, Somerset

Owner: National Trust

Clevedon Court is a 14th Century manor house which was bought and restorated by parliamentarian and Mayor of Bristol Sir Abraham Elton in 1709.

But Historic England researchers say his role as Master of Bristol's Merchant Venturers and investment in the brass industry ties him with the Guinea trade.

Records from 1711 also list Abraham Elton as an investor in the Jason Galley slave ship, although it is murky whether this was him or his son.

His son, Abraham, also invested in slave ships along with brothers Isaac and Jacob, according to the research, which found the siblings lobbied Parliament in their role as traders against slave duties in 1731 and 1738.

The Elton family was still profiting from slave-produced sugar in the late 18th century, but were not listed as claimants at the time of emancipation.

Clevedon Court is a 14th Century manor house which was bought and restorated by parliamentarian and Mayor of Bristol Sir Abraham Elton in 1709

Clevedon Court is a 14th Century manor house which was bought and restorated by parliamentarian and Mayor of Bristol Sir Abraham Elton in 1709

Kings Weston estate, Gloucestershire

Owner: Norman Routledge

The grand Kings Weston Estate in Gloucestershire is now a wedding venue, but centuries ago in the 1600s was owned by merchant and MP Sir Humphrey Hooke, who had ties with Barbados and Virginia.

The present house was built in 1708 by Sir John Vanbrugh for Bristol MP Robert Southwell, who bought Kings Weston in 1708.

Southwell and his son Edward were government officials in the administration of West Indian affairs, and Edward's son, also Edward, promoted the interest of Bristol's merchants in Africa and the West Indes during his spell as an MP.

In the 19th Century, Kings Weston was bought by Philip John Miles, the slave owner who also owned Ashton Court in Bristol.

The grand Kings Weston Estate in Gloucestershire is now a wedding venue, but centuries ago in the 1600s was owned by merchant and MP Sir Humphrey Hooke, who had ties with Barbados and Virginia

The grand Kings Weston Estate in Gloucestershire is now a wedding venue, but centuries ago in the 1600s was owned by merchant and MP Sir Humphrey Hooke, who had ties with Barbados and Virginia

The present house was built in 1708 by Sir John Vanbrugh for Bristol MP Robert Southwell, who bought Kings Weston in 1708

The present house was built in 1708 by Sir John Vanbrugh for Bristol MP Robert Southwell, who bought Kings Weston in 1708

In the 19th Century, Kings Weston was bought by Philip John Miles, the slave owner who also owned Ashton Court in Bristol

In the 19th Century, Kings Weston was bought by Philip John Miles, the slave owner who also owned Ashton Court in Bristol

Penrhyn Castle, Wales

Owner: National Trust

The existing Penrhyn Castle was built in the early 19th century for George Hay Dawkins Pennant, whose wealth was inherited from slave owners.

The National Trust does not gloss over the castle's past and on its website says: 'Behind the formidable architecture, Victorian grandeur and fine interiors, present day Penrhyn Castle's foundations were built on a dark history. One of exploitation, Jamaican sugar fortunes and the transatlantic slave trade.'

The Pennant family's links with slavery began in the latter half of the 17th Century when Gifford Pennant, from Flintshire, bought estates in Jamaica where workers were enslaved.

Gifford's son Edward became chief justice of Jamaica and his sons Samuel, Lord Mayor of London, and John, swelled the family's estates during the early 1700s.

Richard Pennant, born in 1739, later became the 1st Baron Penrhyn and by 1805 owned nearly 1,000 slaves across his four Jamaican plantations.

As an MP, he was vocal in his opposition to the abolition of slavery. In the early nineteenth century, when Penrhyn Castle was being completed, the Pennants received £14,683 – around £1.3million in today's money – for the freeing of 764 enslaved people in Jamaica.

The existing Penrhyn Castle was built in the early 19th century for George Hay Dawkins Pennant, whose wealth was inherited from slave owners

The existing Penrhyn Castle was built in the early 19th century for George Hay Dawkins Pennant, whose wealth was inherited from slave owners

A spokeswoman from the National Trust said: 'The National Trust looks after places and collections that are linked to legacies of colonialism and slavery.

'We have a lot of work to do to ensure these are fully explored and we are working with partners to address this through projects like Colonial Countryside, through our channels and content and exhibitions.

'We have a long way to go but we're working to bring out the often painful and challenging histories attached to our places and collections through interpretation and exploration.'

A spokeswoman for English Heritage said: 'The British country house is often seen as symbol of refinement and civility.

'However, it is only in the last 20 years that the relationship between landed wealth, British properties and enslaved African labour has begun to be fully explored.

'English Heritage has actively commissioned research into the links between slavery and its properties, in an effort to help communicate this difficult history.

'For example although not a slave trader himself, Peter Thellusson at South Yorkshire's Brodsworth Hall, invested in wide varieties of slavery-related commodities and land.

'Marble Hill in Twickenham and Northington Grange in Hampshire both historically had financial ties to Atlantic slavery.

'While at Kenwood House in London, owner Lord Mansfield as Lord Chief Justice, presided over a number of court cases that examined the legality of the slave trade.

'He ruled in 1772 that slavers could not forcibly send any slaves in England out of the country, a significant point along the road to abolition.

'English Heritage is committed to telling the full story of the sites in its care, including those elements that are painful today.'

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