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With Starbucks, employees can wear Black Lives Matters t-shirts and pins after they have been boycotted


Starbucks announced that employees may now wear Black Lives Matter t-shirts and pins after they reportedly banned the articles because they feared it could result in violence.

The Seattle-based company has reversed its dress code so employees can wear Black Lives Matter items on Friday.

In a statement to CNN Business, Starbucks said it was "critical to support the Black Lives Matter movement as the founders intended, and will continue to work closely with community leaders, civil rights leaders, organizations and our partners to help Understanding Starbucks' role can play and be positive for our communities. & # 39;

With Starbucks, employees can wear their own Black Lives Matter T-Shits or Pins until the company's new brand shirts are delivered to 250,000 employees.

Starbucks publicly backed the Black Lives Matter movement after protests against police brutality followed George Floyd's murder, but later told employees they weren't wearing BLM-inspired t-shirts (pictured) or lapel pins allowed to

Starbucks shared a version of their Black Lives Matter design on Twitter after facing a backlash

Starbucks shared a version of their Black Lives Matter design on Twitter after facing a backlash

The brand shirts contain the sentences "Black Lives Matter" and "No Justice, No Peace".

The design is a collaboration between the Starbucks Black Partner Network and Black Starbucks executives.

"This movement is a catalyst for change, and at the moment it tells us that there are many things that need to be addressed so that we can make room for healing," Starbucks said in a letter to the staff that announced the design.

"We have heard that you want to show your support, so just be yourself. We are so proud of your passionate support for our common humanity. & # 39;

The day before, the Starbucks store managers forwarded requests from employees who wanted to wear the clothes, but were advised by their superiors that this was against the company's dress code. Managers were also told that BLM loot could potentially lead to violence.

The stance contradicted the company's statement on Black Lives Matter, released on June 4, in which they announced their commitment.

& # 39; We actively conduct open and necessary discussions with our partners (employees) about racism to which the black community is exposed. Our work doesn't end here, ”they wrote.

However, an internal memo states: “There are agitators who misinterpret the basic principles of the Black Lives Matter movement – and under certain circumstances intentionally re-use them to increase the division.

The memo cited comments from Zing Shaw, the company's vice president of inclusion and diversity.

Starbucks received a call from social media users who thought the company was insincere and hypocritical about its stance on Black Lives Matter

Starbucks received a call from social media users who thought the company was insincere and hypocritical about its stance on Black Lives Matter

An internal Starbucks memo on BLM clothing explains that there are agitators that misinterpret the basic principles of the Black Lives Matter movement - and intentionally reuse them in certain circumstances to increase the split

An internal Starbucks memo on BLM clothing explains that there are agitators that misinterpret the basic principles of the Black Lives Matter movement – and intentionally reuse them in certain circumstances to increase the split

Pictured: Trolice Flavors holds up a fist during a "We Want to Live" march and protests against racial inequality

Pictured: Trolice Flavors holds up a fist during a "We Want to Live" march and protests against racial inequality

“We know that your intention is real and understand how personal it is for so many of us. It's important and we'll hear you, ”the company continues in the memo received from BuzzFeed.

Starbucks was faced with backlash from social media users and employees who viewed the move as hypocritical.

The equity stake fell more than three percent after the incident became known to the public. The company started the morning with a share price of $ 75.74 and ended the day at $ 72.40.

Pictured: shares for Starbuck

Pictured: shares for Starbuck

The staff pointed out that Starbucks encouraged them to wear clothing that celebrates marriage equality and the rights of LGBTQ + during the June Pride month.

Employees told Buzzfeed that the company was distributing buttons and clothing for the Pride month.

Others, outraged by the unveiling, went to Twitter to blow up Starbucks and called for a boycott of the company.

"When Starbucks says # BlackLivesMatter clothing is banned and you end up there, Make & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; wrote Twitter user Steve Marmel.

He encouraged the people to write their names on Starbucks coffee cups and shout out, “Black Lives Matter! Your Frappacino is ready! & # 39; as the hashtag #BoycottStarbucks, Thursday was the trend.

People who found out about the ban went to Twitter to blow up Starbucks and called for a boycott of the company. A tweet from Steve Marmel is shown, which was posted with the hashtag #BoycottStarbucks, which was the trend on Thursday

People who found out about the ban went to Twitter to blow up Starbucks and called for a boycott of the company. A tweet from Steve Marmel is shown, which was posted with the hashtag #BoycottStarbucks, which was the trend on Thursday

Marble's tweet contains an image of a Starbucks coffee mug with the words "Black Lives Matter" on the side (image)

Marble's tweet contains an image of a Starbucks coffee mug with the words "Black Lives Matter" on the side (image)

Katie Mowgli on Twitter said Starbucks "made their racist customers comfortable" in response to the ban.

Mowgli, who tweeted under the @KatieMowgli handle, vowed that she would not visit the stores.

"I will tell EVERYONE I know to boycott them too," she added in the tweet.

A Twitter user who scrutinized @MireyaaAzelinn suggested Starbucks to change his famous mermaid logo in response to the ban.

In her post, she contains a picture of the black goddess Yemaya, a black mermaid from Santeria. The Twitter user claims that the current Starbucks logo is based on Yemaya.

Starbucks claims that its original logo is based on an old Norse woodcut siren.

Katie Mowgli on Twitter said Starbucks "made their racist customers comfortable" in response to the ban.

Katie Mowgli on Twitter said Starbucks "made their racist customers comfortable" in response to the ban.

A Twitter user who scrutinized @MireyaaAzelinn suggested Starbucks to change his famous mermaid logo in response to the ban

A Twitter user who scrutinized @MireyaaAzelinn suggested Starbucks to change his famous mermaid logo in response to the ban

In her post, @MireyaaAzelinn contains a picture of the black goddess Yemaya, a black mermaid from Santeria. The Twitter user claims that the current Starbucks logo is based on Yemaya (image)

In her post, @MireyaaAzelinn contains a picture of the black goddess Yemaya, a black mermaid from Santeria. The Twitter user claims that the current Starbucks logo is based on Yemaya (image)

The company said it investigated how "we can unite with our black partners, customers, and community members while proudly wearing the green apron in our stores."

It adds that everyone in the company can wear a "Keep it Brewing" shirt from his Black Partner Network.

Starbucks employees who had heard of the memo were critical of the policy.

Starbucks said it took care of how we could unite with our black partners, customers, and community members while proudly wearing the green apron in our stores.

Starbucks said it took care of how we could unite with our black partners, customers, and community members while proudly wearing the green apron in our stores.

"This statement prioritizes those who feel uncomfortable with black lives," 22-year-old Atlanta barista Carl Bensen told BuzzFeed.

“My skin color causes violence at Starbucks. Shouldn't I come to work? & # 39; he asked. & # 39; It is silenced and Starbucks is complicit. Starbucks must be with us more than ever. & # 39;

A Starbucks spokesman initially told Buzzfeed that while the company was determined to end systematic racism, the guidelines continue to keep business safe and inviting.

"We respect all of our partners' opinions and beliefs and encourage them to bring themselves to work while complying with our dress code," said the spokesman.

Starbucks has encouraged everyone in the company to wear a "Keep it Brewing" shirt from its Black Partner Network

Starbucks has encouraged everyone in the company to wear a "Keep it Brewing" shirt from its Black Partner Network

Starbucks in a tweet on June 1, when protests broke out against George Floyd's police murder, calling for "open and honest talks about racial injustices".

Starbucks in a tweet on June 1, when protests broke out against George Floyd's police murder, calling for "open and honest talks about racial injustices".

But in 2018, Starbucks got into controversy after a manager in Philadelphia called the police over two black men sitting in the store.

The store manager claimed she called for loitering, but several people called the incident racist because there were several white customers in the shop at the time and the police were not confronting them.

Rashon Nelson and Donte Robinson, both 23, arrived early for a meeting at Starbucks.

As soon as they arrived, Nelson asked to use the toilet while his friend found them a table

But a manager, Holly Hylton, told him the toilets were "for paying customers only" and decided to take his place and wait until they met

"I just left it at that moment," he said to Good Morning America.

Notoriously: The viral video that triggered the scandal showed the police handcuffing Rashon Nelson (pictured) and then Donte Robinson. They said that they were only released at midnight

Notoriously: The viral video that triggered the scandal showed the police handcuffing Rashon Nelson first and then Donte Robinson (pic). They said that they were only released at midnight

Notoriously: The viral video that triggered the scandal showed the police handcuffing Rashon Nelson first and then Donte Robinson (right). They said that they were only released at midnight

Shortly thereafter, Robinson said the manager had come out of the register to speak to them.

"We sit at the table, we sit down, we only talk to each other. She comes out of the till and approaches her to ask if she can help us with anything. Can we start with a few drinks or water or something? Robinson says.

Robinson says they refused and said they were "just waiting for a meeting" and "we'll be out very quickly."

But about two minutes after they got to the cafe, the manager called 911 and said they "refused to make a purchase."

The video of the incident was shared on Facebook Live and quickly viralized, prompting many to boycott the coffee company.

The company created a "Third Place Policy" after the incident, stating that Starbucks "is committed to creating a culture of warmth and belonging that welcomes everyone.

"We want our stores to be the third place, a warm and welcoming environment where customers can gather and connect," said a policy statement.

"Any customer can use Starbucks rooms, including our toilets, cafes and patios, regardless of whether they are making a purchase," the statement said.

In addition to this policy, Starbucks has committed $ 1 million to develop anti-bias resources and training to combat bias and racism. The initiative, says Starbucks, comes through a partnership with Arizona State University.

Starbucks has pledged $ 1 million to organizations dedicated to racial justice. Funding is provided through a partnership with Arizona State University. A tweet from the company (picture) announced the initiative

Starbucks has pledged $ 1 million to organizations dedicated to racial justice. Funding is provided through a partnership with Arizona State University. A tweet from the company (picture) announced the initiative

Despite recent efforts to support Black Lives Matter, Starbucks employees still complained that the company was not sincere enough about George Floyd's murder in Minneapolis on Memorial Day.

The 46-year-old black father of two died when he was arrested by a white officer. The video of the incident shows police officer Derek Chauvin, who has now been released, pushing his knee against Floyd's neck for almost 9 minutes, causing his death.

Floyd's death triggered protests across the country against police brutality and called for reform.

“We have a police detail outside the store most days anyway. Let's just call him if a customer is offended by a BLM PIN, ”an anonymous Starbucks employee told Buzzfeed.

"There's something deeper here," the employee criticizes Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson.

"Kevin Johnson speaks a great conversation on Twitter, but he's still the manager of a multi-billion dollar company that has to keep up with his image," said the employee. "God forbid when employees tarnish this pristine global image."

An anonymous Starbucks employee criticized CEO Kevin Johnson (pictured). "Kevin Johnson speaks a great conversation on Twitter, but he's still the manager of a multi-billion dollar company that has to keep up with his image," said the employee.

An anonymous Starbucks employee criticized CEO Kevin Johnson (pictured). "Kevin Johnson speaks a great conversation on Twitter, but he's still the manager of a multi-billion dollar company that has to keep up with his image," said the employee.

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