ENTERTAINMENT

Which rule of six? Young Britons are already ignoring Boris Johnson's new Covid restrictions


The coronavirus & # 39; Rule of Six & # 39; became a farce today as the British ignored the new restrictions and told Downing Street the police would not punish law breakers.

As of this morning, the British were banned from gathering in groups of more than six people under new government guidelines to curb Covid infection rates – the first widespread tightening of the lockdown since March.

But Number 10 sparked confusion this afternoon when it suggested that the police would not immediately fine those who break the rules for the first time today.

People across the country already seem to be breaking the new rules, with pictures from Bath, Somerset this afternoon shows a group of 14 gathering in a river.

A group of 10 also gathered at Pontefract Racecourse in West Yorkshire to soak up the hot weather while an anti-mask protest in Nottingham drew large crowds.

42-year-old Samantha Jones from Grimsby, who lost her job as a saleswoman earlier this year due to Covid's lockdown, slammed the new rules and vowed to break them.

She said, “If the government thinks I will obey the rule of six, they can think again. I'm standing here with four adults and three children and the restrictions go into effect today in such a way that I am technically breaking the rules.

“But I have five children, three of whom live with me, and I have two grandchildren. There is no way I'm going to stop my kids from seeing their grandparents, or stop my older daughter from taking my grandchildren around. It's utter nonsense.

“My sister has eight children and because in England – unlike Wales or Scotland – there are children in your bladder of six, she cannot have anyone around. That doesn't seem fair at all.

“If people can still mingle in pubs, restaurants, at work and at school, I will continue to see members of my family even if it means breaking that rule of six. Realistically, the police won't stop everyone, will they?

"And there is no way I'm going to sniff someone who does the same!"

It comes after Boris Johnson sent shock waves across the nation last week when he announced the restrictions, the first widespread tightening of the lockdown since March.

However, the rules in England are stricter than Wales and Scotland, where children under the age of 12 are exempt from the crackdown.

Coronavirus cases have increased by at least 3,000 every 24 hours, and some experts have warned drastic measures must be taken.

Another day of dramatic coronavirus developments:

  • Labor Sir Keir Starmer self-isolated after a member of his household developed a symptom of coronavirus just hours after speaking on the LBC radio studios.
  • England records just one more hospital death from Covid-19 as a tentative number as Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have no new casualties.
  • Union leaders threaten to strike over government plans to get four out of five officials back to work by the end of September;
  • Wetherspoons Reveals 66 Workers Tested Positive for Coronavirus, with outbreaks reported in 50 of its 861 pubs;
  • Rishi Sunak "could postpone the budget until January" amid fears that a second coronavirus wave this fall could hit the economy worse.
  • Britain is betting on another coronavirus vaccine with a £ 1.3 billion investment in a Scottish factory that will produce 190 million doses of Valneva's shock.
  • According to confidential emails, Prof. Chris Whitty "betrayed" chief scientist Sir Patrick Vallance because he pushed too hard for a lockdown in March.
  • H.Hospital admissions for seven serious non-covidic diseases, including heart attacks, drop by 173,000 – as GPs are instructed to see patients face-to-face.

People enjoy the water at Warleigh Weir on the River Avon near Bath in Somerset as the six rules restrictions become law

A group of seven sat together this afternoon in Royal Victoria Park in Bath, Somerset, brazenly ignoring the new rules

The people of Manchester huddled together as they enjoyed the sun in the city center this afternoon - while apparently breaking new laws

The people of Manchester huddled together as they enjoyed the sun in the city center this afternoon – while apparently breaking new laws

A group of more than six people is sitting together on Portobello Beach despite the Scottish Government's new rule that no more than six people from two households can come together

A group of more than six people is sitting together on Portobello Beach despite the Scottish Government's new rule that no more than six people from two households can come together

In Hackney Marshes, east London, the public is enjoying a small heat wave over a canal and breaking new regulations

In Hackney Marshes, east London, the public is enjoying a small heat wave over a canal and breaking new regulations

Any gathering of more than six people in England will be illegal as of today - although those people appear to be ignoring the rules

Any gathering of more than six people in England will be illegal as of today – although those people appear to be ignoring the rules

On Primrose Hill in north London, groups of six or more joined forces for a day in the sunshine for the first test, usually

On Primrose Hill in north London, groups of six or more joined forces for a day in the sunshine for the first test, usually

A group of 12 in Scotland looked like they were trying in part to create social distancing but were still breaking new rules

A group of 12 in Scotland looked like they were trying in part to create social distancing but were still breaking new rules

No Safe Six: A group of seven people watch a friend play football in the autumn sunshine on Bournemouth beach in Dorset

No Safe Six: A group of seven people watch a friend play football in the autumn sunshine on Bournemouth beach in Dorset

On the first day of the Pontefract circuit, ten teenagers were held on the lawn to cling to groups of just six

On the first day of the Pontefract circuit, ten teenagers were held on the lawn to cling to groups of just six

However, several Britons, Leanne Groves, 38, a mother of four from Grimsby, said, “I am pleased that the government put this rule in place to try to stop another surge in coronavirus cases, but it appears inconvenient to me.

“It is my daughter's birthday and now she must be told that she cannot have her friends or our family.

“I have four young children, but they're part of the rule of six, so my mom and grandmother can't both come by the way they normally do.

“However, my children can go to school and talk to more than six people. I can go to work and be with more than six people and even get on the bus with more than six people to work. It therefore makes no sense that you cannot meet with your loved one and loved one.

“I'm a manager at McDonalds and when I come to work there are at least 25 employees and numerous customers around all day.

"I'll have to stick to it, but it's going to be really difficult to hold onto as we get closer to Christmas, especially since you want to be with your family."

How to Practice Safe Six

FAMILY AND HOUSEHOLDS

AUS: All gatherings of more than six people are illegal, which jeopardizes the traditional family Christmas.

A family of five can only meet one grandparent at a time, while families of six or more are prohibited from meeting anyone.

ON: The only exception is when a household or support bubble consists of more than six people.

Support bubbles allow adults who live alone – as well as single parents – to join another household.

SOCIALIZATION

AUS: All social gatherings of more than six people – whether book club, dinner party or picnic – are prohibited.

The police will have the power to break into larger groups in parks, pubs and private homes.

An army of “Covid Marshals” is being recruited by the councils to step up enforcement, patrol city centers, parks, malls and train stations, and encourage large groups to break up.

People in groups of seven or more face a fine of £ 100, which doubles to a maximum of £ 3,200 for each repeat offense.

OFF: Pubs or restaurants cannot accommodate more than six people at one table. Restaurants can still accommodate more than six people, but each group must be separate and safe from one another.

You can't go to a pub in one group and then join another group. Venues will be fined £ 1,000 for failing to comply with the rules.

RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES

ON: Churches, synagogues, mosques and temples remain open, although the parishes must be at least one meter apart.

ON: Wedding ceremonies and receptions are exempt from the new rules. Up to 30 guests are allowed, but must sit or stand one meter apart.

ON: Funerals are also excluded, 30 people are allowed.

SPORTS

ON: Gyms, leisure centers and swimming pools will remain open as long as they are "Covid-safe" and enforce social distancing rules. Yoga or exercise classes with more than six people are allowed.

ON: Popular sport is largely unaffected. Recreational sports such as soccer, cricket, rugby, and park runs can continue as long as they comply with the protocols. But teams with more than six players cannot have a beer together after the game.

ON: Professional sports and elite training can continue. Pilot events to reintroduce fans to stadiums can continue, but with a limit of 1,000 spectators.

SCHOOLS, CHILD CARE AND OFFICES

ON: Schools and universities are not affected by the new rules. However, you must continue to work according to the existing guidelines.

ON: Youth groups, registered childcare and playgroups are exempt from the rule of six.

OFF: The rules also apply outside of these settings, so that a group of ten school friends cannot go from the classroom to a park or seven colleagues cannot go from the office to the pub.

PROTESTS

ON: Protests can be carried out in groups of more than six people, provided they are "Covid-safe".

The builder Don Brett, 62, from Leytonstone, East London, added: “I don't understand the new six person rule. I don't get it and I really don't care.

“We have been through this pandemic for more than six months. And I understand that and I know that I have to take care of myself.

“I take care of others, but it's up to me to do what makes sense to me.

“It's not that the government has to tell me what to do again.

“They keep changing their minds anyway. So I just do what I have to do. See my family and friends when I can and try to keep a safe distance. & # 39;

Alan Andrews, a 24-year-old bricklayer of Chingford, Essex, said, “Who is Boris Johnson telling us what to do after he and his government screw it up?

“They stand there preaching and they just look like they don't know what they're talking about.

“They only care about business and economy, not about working people like me. “I don't understand what this new six-person rule is about. You tried to explain it on the radio this morning. But I was lost at what they were talking about. It's confusing. & # 39;

Sister Maria Heulmo said: “The policy that the government put in place on the virus has always been too late.

“Since we closed late, everything is out of date. They should have been brought in earlier and this new six-person role is the same.

“Of course we should all obey these new rules, but I don't think this is the best time to do so. "It's never too late, but these kinds of rules should have been put in place earlier to save lives."

She said she was "absolutely certain" that the UK would go into lockdown again because of the rising number of Covid cases.

Ed Marshall, who works at The Grosvenor Pub in Cleethorpes, said: “As of today, we are no longer accepting bookings for more than six people.

“Staff are also told to make sure people don't mingle between the tables and that they stick to their own party.

“Right now, customers can either order their drinks through a mobile app and have the drinks delivered to the table, or they can come to a specific part of the bar where there are sticky spots on the floor that make sure people get one when they order Maintain a safe distance.

“We take these new regulations very seriously and keep them very strict. Anyone who breaks the new rule of six can ask to leave the pub.

Grimsby caregiver Katie Cookson, 38, said, “The new restrictions are there for a reason. We need to get rid of this virus, or at least control it as soon as possible. I live in a household with four or two children and my partner.

I don't really hang out with too many people besides my mom because I'm their full-time caregiver.

I think people should do whatever they can to stop the spread of the coronavirus and to be honest, I would have no problem reporting one of my neighbors who I saw breaking the new rules.

"Older people are most at risk and I have to think about my mother."

Mourad Zouane, 47, who runs La Gondola's takeaway pizza in Grimsby, said: “We only allow two customers at a time, and there are really only two people I can meet in my family anyway, so for me this rule of six doesn't affect me too much.

“Would I report someone who broke the new rules? I'm not sure, but I think my wife would because she gets very angry about it.

"She says people should obey the rules."

Atilla Herceg, 38, said: “I was supposed to camp with ten people next week, but now we will only be six. To be honest, I don't really care about this new rule, but the main thing that I worry about is a £ 10,000 fine.

“The government should have acted much faster. Other countries have enforced coronavirus restrictions much more strictly. I think this new rule won't make a difference because I'm afraid we're approaching another lockdown. & # 39;

Interior designer Laurent Couacuad, 44, said, “People weren't responsible, so these new restrictions are being put in place. I have been very careful, but I worry that a lot of people, especially younger ones, will ignore this new rule.

“It doesn't really concern me because I don't think I have six friends and I never go out anyway. Most of the time I am alone. & # 39;

Calum McArthur, 18, about to start acting school, said, “It's a lot of rubbish. I will still go out with my friends and have a good time because I want to enjoy my life.

“The government will definitely not be able to enforce this. I've met a lot of my friends and we will continue to do so. I don't care about fines or the fact that it might be illegal. & # 39;

Brighton beach looked very busy with groups of more than six people sitting near the seafront on a sunny day

Brighton beach looked very busy with groups of more than six people sitting near the seafront on a sunny day

Groups of more than six people also met in Leeds, although strict regulations were in place today

Groups of more than six people also met in Leeds, although strict regulations were in place today

In Nottingham, anti-maskers broke the rule of six in an admittedly unsurprising breach of regulations on the first day

In Nottingham, anti-maskers broke the rule of six in an admittedly unsurprising breach of regulations on the first day

The police tried to protest against the protesters, but their advice and warnings seemed to fall on deaf ears

The police tried to protest against the protesters, but their advice and warnings seemed to fall on deaf ears

A solidarity demonstration for Iranians / Kurds took place in Newcastle city center today, during which the police were apparently unable to stop the gathering despite crossing the six line

A solidarity demonstration for Iranians / Kurds took place in Newcastle city center today, during which the police were apparently unable to stop the gathering despite crossing the six line

His friend Ben Wilson, also 18, said, “I'm going to the pub with some friends tonight and there will be more than six of us. Most young people don't care about coronavirus or this new rule. It won't stop us from going out and having fun.

“I have a lot of friends at college and they all go to big parties and none of them are socially distant. I don't think this new rule will make any difference. I have some things planned for the next few weeks as I also go to university myself and don't worry that there will be more than six people there. & # 39;

Both teenagers admitted to regularly attending "gatherings" with friends in a number of parks in west London that were attended by between 40 and 50 people.

Mr. McAruthur said, “I will continue to go to these meetings and to the pub. I am young and I want to have fun. & # 39;

Danuta Bildziuk, who described her age as & # 39; 60 plus & # 39; said: & # 39; It won't be a problem for my age group, but I do worry that young people will stick to the rule.

“I took all possible precautions. It's natural that young people want to be in groups of more than six people, but I think we all need to take on a little more responsibility, regardless of our age. & # 39;

Her husband Arthur added, “I really hope the kids stick to this new rule, but I'm afraid they won't. I'm worried that in coronavirus cases we could be heading for an increase and another lockdown.

“There's a generation difference in this whole thing because a lot of young people don't think they're going to get the virus and if they do they won't be killed. Unfortunately, that's not the case with people my age. & # 39;

Hari Radiman, who runs a coffee kiosk in front of a subway station, said: “It will be very difficult for me to stick to this new rule. I'll be fine most of the time, but if there's a big event coming up, like a friend's birthday, then I might end up breaking it.

“A lot of people will try to stick to it in the beginning, but I don't know how long they can hold out. We all feel trapped and now more restrictions are being placed on us. My big concern is that young people will completely ignore this new rule because they really feel that their lives have been ruined. & # 39;

Ministers ridiculed after Covid & # 39; Rule of Six & # 39; Outlaws & # 39; mingle & # 39; – as Downing Street creates confusion by saying that people should NOT be punished for initial violations

Ministers were mocked today at the new "rule of six" after it was found that "blending" was banned – while Downing Street created confusion by saying that people should not be punished if they first oppose it breach the curbs.

MPs joked that "strolling" should be banned next as the British struggled to come to terms with the latest edict issued by the government in a desperate attempt to control coronavirus cases.

Photos from across the country suggested the public still did not understand the new system, despite Police Minister Kit Malthouse urging people to sneak up on neighbors who break the rules.

Home Secretary Priti Patel also warned that criminals could face criminal records and fines of several thousand pounds for refusing to obey the law.

Police chiefs admitted that the precautions were "confusing" and the prime minister's spokesman insisted that the officers would not impose heavy penalties on individuals if they did not persist in refusing to obey them.

Meanwhile, the government's response to the surge in infections has been judged by top scientists to be panicked and not based on evidence, given that those responsible are a "dad's army" with no experience.

Other experts underscored the deep disagreement and alarmingly warned that the outbreak was on the verge of spiraling out of control after the daily case rate exceeded 3,000 for the first time in months.

Boris Johnson sent shock waves across the nation last week when he announced the restrictions, the first widespread tightening of the lockdown since March. The rules are now in effect in England after a sunny weekend when many people had one last meeting before the misery hit.

Gatherings of more than six people have been made illegal to curb a surge in coronavirus cases. It has caused anger that many larger households can no longer meet with others.

However, the rules in England are stricter than Wales and Scotland, where children under the age of 12 are exempt from the crackdown.

The British are now waiting with bated breath to see whether the action can lower the infections again. There has been a huge increase in France and Spain in particular, but Belgium, which has adopted a similar approach, appears to be more under control.

There are fears that failing in the run-up to Christmas will result in worse curbs. A curfew for pubs at 10 p.m. is being considered when alerting that young people are "forgetting" the Covid regulations.

There were giant signs in Bolton today imposing the law on residents - where a local lockdown has been imposed to combat a flare-up of cases

There were giant signs in Bolton today imposing the law on residents – where a local lockdown has been imposed to combat a flare-up of cases

According to experts, the UK coronavirus response is being led by "Dad's Army" with no experience

Professor Tom Jefferson has criticized the government's decision to enforce stricter lockdown rules

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, said the new rules revealed a "fundamental misunderstanding" of the current state of the coronavirus in the UK

Professor Tom Jefferson (left) and Professor Carl Heneghan (right) have criticized the government's decision to enforce stricter lockdown rules

The UK's coronavirus response is being led by a "dad's army" of well-paid people with no experience, two leading scientists said as they urged Number 10 to stop panic and abolish the controversial rule of six.

Oxford University Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson accused Boris Johnson of making a number of "catastrophic" mistakes since returning to work in April after his own battle against the killer virus.

The pair warned Downing Street that limiting gatherings that came into force today was "worrying" and "has no scientific evidence to back it up", arguing that it could have "serious consequences."

And when they called on ministers to get on with life because it is "unrealistic" to curb the spread of Covid-19, they warned that the government's "throw of the dice" could bring the public over the edge and said it should To be “put under the spell”.

Professor Heneghan and Professor Jefferson wrote in The Telegraph: "It is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence to support it and has potentially significant social consequences."

The column criticized the prime minister's handling of the pandemic, warning he was "plagued by fears, doubts and fears".

And it was said he made a number of mistakes since returning to work in April after battling the killer virus himself.

The two experts added: “The rule of the six directives should be summarized.

When Boris Johnson returned to work in April after his treatment for coronavirus, he warned that lockdown restrictions must remain in place to prevent a second wave.

"Since then, the Prime Minister, worried by fears, doubts and fears, and surrounded by a platoon of advisors, has made one cautious, catastrophic mistake after another."

Changes to regulations in England were published late Sunday evening, about 30 minutes before they came into force.

People are fined £ 100, doubling to a maximum of £ 3,200 for repeat offenses, for breaking the law that prohibits social gatherings of more than six people indoors or outdoors.

However, enforcement could prove difficult as a list of exceptions allows for larger gatherings in places such as education and work.

Venues such as places of worship, gyms, restaurants, and hospitality facilities can accommodate more than six people in total, while weddings and funerals can accommodate a maximum of 30 people.

The law also provides that people are not allowed to "mix" with people outside their own group of six at broader public events.

Attorney Adam Wagner, who analyzed the new rules, mocked the wording of the regulation.

"Do you greet someone at a meeting that mingles?" What about keeping the door open for them? & # 39;

Tory MP Simon Hoare told MailOnline the rules were a little ridiculous.

“Could you hang around? Can you stroll Could you do pottery? It's a very strange word, ”he said.

“Wasn't she a figure from neighbors? Or was that Mrs. Mangle? «

But he said the coronavirus restrictions expose margins of error between civil liberties and public health considerations, and the latter must take precedence.

& # 39; Caution is the mother of the porcelain box. If the leadership tells the government to dictate something, we should follow, ”he said.

"They are the kind of people who would probably say at the height of the Black Death that it is perfectly reasonable to keep wild rats as pets."

Mr. Hoare added, "There is a time when we need only rely on expert knowledge and the premise that the government prefers that most of its citizens stay alive rather than die."

This morning, Mr Malthouse said families should report their neighbors if they saw they were breaking the rules.

And he did not rule out the possibility of a special hotline – although he insisted that the police's non-emergency number was the point of contact for the time being.

He said: & # 39; We are discussing what reporting mechanisms it could be. There is obviously the non-emergency number that people can call to report any issues they wish, and certainly at the lockdown – the initial stage of the lockdown – we saw an increase in these reports to the police.

“If people are concerned and believe that there has been a violation, that option is theirs.

"It is open to people to do this on the non-emergency number and if they are concerned and see something like this they should definitely think about it."

The government's "rule of six" was introduced today as it tried to combat soaring coronavirus infection rates by restricting sessions both indoors and outdoors.

The police can fine people up to £ 3,200 for breaking the new rules.

Mr Malthouse said today: “The police officers will of course assess the situation in front of you, but in the end we all have an individual duty to our collective health and we hope that this view will prevail.

“The police should first encourage people to obey, explain the situation to them and impose on them the duty they have for our collective health. Only in the situation where individuals refuse to comply should the police consider turning to enforcement. "

Ms. Patel wrote in The Sun that those who fail to pay the fines have a criminal record.

"These new rules are easier to understand and easier for the police to enforce," she said.

“I know that the law-abiding majority will adhere to these new rules as part of our national efforts. But there will be a small minority who don't, and the police have the necessary powers to take action against them.

"This disease is fatal and therefore it is right that the police take action where people break the rules."

Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC), said he accepted rule changes "being confusing to the public."

But he told BBC Breakfast that officials were working to make sure they were being followed. "That was a big challenge for the police over six months," he said.

& # 39; We had the initial universal lockdown, we've had changes since then, the public needs to understand those changes.

“We work with all of our partners in local government, with people who do business, with people who do other parts of the hospitality industry. We are part of the group that tries to explain the rules to members of the public and encourage people to comply with them. & # 39;

Lord Sumption told BBC Radio 4's Today, however, "I would say that people should make their own decisions in the light of their own health and that the law should play a minor role for them."

Entrepreneurs and their customers also expressed anger but vowed to abide by the rules for not wanting to impose heavy fines.

Grish Gregorian, 61 owner of Café Florentine in Ealing, West London, told MailOnline: “It just doesn't make sense to me. I had some clients this morning who wanted to work in offices with up to 50 employees. What is the problem when a large group comes to my cafe for dinner?

“The rule will cause more problems for companies like me who are already having problems. I mostly get bigger bookings for the weekend, but I've already had to turn some down for this weekend because I'm unwilling to break the law, stupid as it is. & # 39;

Mr Gregorian admitted that he had met with up to 20 friends and family at the pub on Sunday before the new restrictions went into effect.

Entrepreneurs express anger over "rule of six"

Entrepreneurs and their customers also expressed anger but vowed to abide by the rules for not wanting to impose heavy fines.

Grish Gregorian, 61 owner of Café Florentine in Ealing, West London, told MailOnline: “It just doesn't make sense to me. I had some clients this morning who wanted to work in offices with up to 50 employees. What is the problem when a large group comes to my cafe for dinner?

“The rule will cause more problems for companies like me who are already having problems. I mostly get bigger bookings for the weekend, but I've already had to turn some down for this weekend because I'm unwilling to break the law, stupid as it is. & # 39;

Mr Gregorian admitted that he had met with up to 20 friends and family at the pub on Sunday before the new restrictions went into effect.

He said, “We don't know when we'll meet again, so we thought we'd celebrate a bit while it was still legal. I've made it clear to all of my clients that they are all welcome as long as there are no more than six of them in a group. & # 39;

Frederick Scandello, 31 owner of the Coat of Miracles coffee shop in Ealing, West London, said: “This is bad news for the hospitality industry, which is already suffering. I don't allow more than one customer at a time and everyone has to sit in front of my café.

“If there are more than six together, I will make it clear that I cannot serve them. To be honest, my cafe is pretty small, but it's the bigger places that will really suffer. The rule doesn't make sense to me because you can get on a bus or go to work and be surrounded by more than six people. But I feel that the government will strictly enforce this and I will not make sure that I am not breaking the rules. & # 39;

He said, “We don't know when we'll meet again, so we thought we'd celebrate a bit while it was still legal. I've made it clear to all of my clients that they are all welcome as long as there are no more than six of them in a group. & # 39;

Frederick Scandello, 31 owner of the Coat of Miracles coffee shop in Ealing, West London, said: “This is bad news for the hospitality industry, which is already suffering. I don't allow more than one customer at a time and everyone has to sit in front of my café.

“If there are more than six together, I will make it clear that I cannot serve them. To be honest, my cafe is pretty small, but it's the bigger places that will really suffer. The rule doesn't make sense to me because you can get on a bus or go to work and be surrounded by more than six people. But I feel that the government will strictly enforce this and I will not make sure that I am not breaking the rules. & # 39;

Lorenzo Culurzo, 41, who was having a coffee, announced that he had decided to cancel his wife's birthday party next week and a number of other social gatherings he wanted to attend.

He said, “We had a party for 30 people but decided not to continue. I don't feel like being fined £ 10,000.

“Most of the time I like to sit alone and drink coffee, but I like going to social gatherings with my friends in the evenings. But all of that will be put on hold until the rules change. & # 39;

Amy Lynch, 23, a student from Solihull, said, “It's a good move, but it's impossible to push through.

"I don't think anyone will follow him."

Meanwhile, leading experts have issued a withering verdict on the government's coronavirus response, which has been led by a "Dad's Army" of well-paid people with no experience.

Oxford University Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson accused Mr Johnson of making a number of "catastrophic" mistakes since returning to work in April after his own battle against the killer virus.

The pair warned Downing Street that limiting gatherings that came into force today was "worrying" and "has no scientific evidence to back it up", arguing that it could have "serious consequences."

They called on ministers to get on with life because it was "unrealistic" to curb the spread of Covid-19. They warned that the government's "roll of the dice" could bring the public over the edge and said it should be "bundled".

Professor Heneghan and Professor Jefferson wrote in The Telegraph: "It is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence to support it and has potentially significant social consequences."

Keir Starmer goes into Covid quarantine after the LBC phone call

Keir Starmer said he will be quarantined today after a member of his household showed coronavirus-type symptoms.

The Labor leader announced that he would go into self-isolation after a phone call in the LBC radio studios. The party has informed the radio station about the situation.

A Labor spokesman said: "This morning, Keir Starmer was advised to self-isolate after a member of his household showed possible symptoms of the coronavirus. The member of his household has now had a test.

"In accordance with NHS guidelines, Keir will self-isolate pending test results and further advice from medical professionals."

It is believed that Sir Keir himself has shown no signs of the disease – although he coughed during the performance – but will not speak about Brexit later in the Commons debate.

Sir Keir sat relatively close to presenter Nick Ferrari in the radio studios today before going into quarantine.

The column criticized the prime minister's handling of the pandemic, warning he was "plagued by fears, doubts and fears".

And it was said he made a number of mistakes since returning to work in April after battling the killer virus himself.

The two experts added: “The rule of the six directives should be summarized.

When Boris Johnson returned to work in April after his treatment for coronavirus, he warned that lockdown restrictions must remain in place to prevent a second wave.

Since then, worried by fears, doubts and fears, and surrounded by a platoon of advisors, the Prime Minister has made one cautious, catastrophic mistake after another.

"Last week's dice roll of the 'Rule of Six' could well be the policy that is driving the UK public over the edge because it is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence and may end." have great social consequences. & # 39;

Criticizing the government's attempt to blame young people for a recent surge in Covid-19 infections, the professors asked what the purpose of the Eat Out to Help Out program was if there were any increases would.

They say the rule of six will have minimal impact, citing their years of research at the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine, which was set up to improve day-to-day clinical practice.

They wrote, "The decision to restrict gatherings is at its core a fundamental misunderstanding of what is happening to the coronavirus in the UK."

The Telegraph article noted that there are currently 600 Covid patients in hospital, compared with 17,000 at the height of the pandemic.

Five people died with Covid-19 yesterday, compared to an average of more than 1,000 at the height of the pandemic.

The people at Warleigh Weir on the River Avon near Bath, Somerset, seemed to still grapple with the "rule of six" today

The people at Warleigh Weir on the River Avon near Bath, Somerset, seemed to still grapple with the "rule of six" today

There were groups of people traveling in Scotland despite Nicola Sturgeon imposing the harsh restrictions of today

There were groups of people traveling in Scotland despite Nicola Sturgeon imposing the harsh restrictions of today

A group of young people enjoy the warm September weather on Primrose Hill in north London this afternoon

A group of young people enjoy the warm September weather on Primrose Hill in north London this afternoon

There was a small protest against the new coronavirus restrictions in Parliament Square this afternoon

There was a small protest against the new coronavirus restrictions in Parliament Square this afternoon

Boris Johnson was on Downing Street today as the government came under pressure to deal with the coronavirus crisis

Frederick Scandello, 31 owner of the Coat of Miracles coffee shop in Ealing

Grish Gregorian, 61 owner of Café Florentine in Ealing

Frederick Scandello (left), 31 owner of the Coat of Miracles coffee shop in Ealing, west London, said the rule of six is ​​"bad news for the hotel industry, which is already suffering." Grish Gregorian (right), 61 owner of Café Florentine in Ealing, West London, told MailOnline: "It just doesn't make sense to me."

Britain will dive back into Covid lockdown if people fail to abide by the new rule of six, the government adviser says

The UK must act quickly to prevent coronavirus cases from spiraling out of control as a “trickle” of cases can turn into a “cascade,” warns a researcher advising the government.

Peter Openshaw, professor of experimental medicine at Imperial College London, said that if people fail to adhere to the government's "rule of six" the country will face a "hard lock".

His comments come as NHS Nightingale hospitals are reportedly on "covid standby" as coronavirus cases emerge across the UK.

Boris Johnson's draconian new "rule of six" went into effect in England today as part of stricter social distancing measures for fear of a second wave.

Prof. Openshaw, a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG), added that the UK needs to act quickly, even if a delay of a few days is potentially "dangerous".

The 2020 Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (No. 2) (England) (amendment) (No. 4) states that more than six people can come from the same household or two "connected households" – consisting of a household of one Adult and any number of children and a second with no limit on the number of adults or children.

The rules allow for a total of more than six people indoors operated by a business, nonprofit, benevolent or philanthropic entity, or public entity, or at outdoor events organized by a corporation, charitable, benevolent, or philanthropic entity become a public body or a political body ”.

However, participants must be part of a “qualified group” of up to six people, a single household or connected households.

And no one is allowed to join any other group or otherwise mix with anyone outside of their own group, according to the law.

Downing Street suggested today that the police would not immediately impose fines on anyone who violates the Six Rule Restrictions.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman said, “What you would expect is the police out there today encouraging people to obey the new rules. However, in the days to come, it will be right when we see people continue to break the new rules and people could face a fine.

"The regulations are designed to help stop the virus from spreading, protect the NHS and ultimately save lives."

When asked if people should report neighbors violating the coronavirus rules, the prime minister's official spokesman said, "We want people to focus on following the new rules and making sure they are back to being like in the past helping the rules to slow down the spread of the virus.

"What you've seen in the past few weeks is a egregious violation of the rules like holding large illegal parties, and members of the public have turned to the police about this danger because they were concerned about the public health risk . "

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said he supported the government's six rules restrictions that went into effect this week.

In an interview with LBC radio he said: "I support the 'rule of six'.

“I think you need something simple, easy to understand, and I think the government was slow in February and March to see the problem that was about the face and we can't repeat that mistake again, so I support the rule of six & # 39 ;.

Prof. Chris Whitty "betrayed" the chief scientist Sir Patrick Vallance because he pushed too hard for a ban

The government's chief scientist was "dismissed" for pushing too hard on the lockdown as coronavirus cases spiked, a private email revealed today.

Sir Patrick Vallance said he argued "stronger than anyone" for tough restrictions early on in the crisis as he defended his own performance during the internal dispute.

In the message to other science officers, Sir Patrick complained that he had been reprimanded by Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty and then Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill for the tough demeanor.

The spit, released in an email to Sky News under the rules of freedom of information, sheds light on the tensions at the heart of the government as it grappled with the challenge of the deadly disease.

Sir Patrick and Prof. Whitty in particular have always tried to present a unified front, as they are jointly responsible for the cabinet's interpretation of the complex evidence for the coronavirus and often flank the Prime Minister at press conferences.

Experts have condemned the government's response to the coronavirus as "one careful, catastrophic mistake after another". Oxford University Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson warned that the draconian "Rule of Six" restrictions imposed today have "no scientific basis" and "could drive the public over the edge".

The internal argument arose when Sir Patrick and his colleagues discussed how to respond to the Sunday Times allegations that the lockdown announcement was too late – which finally happened on March 23.

Sir Patrick's May 23 message said it was "very clear what we have warned of and what we need to be prepared for".

He added, "It is also that I have argued more strongly than anyone in favor of lockdown measures (with a hint from CMO, PS DHSC and CabSec)."

CMO is an abbreviation for "Chief Medical Officer", Prof. Whitty, while PS DHSC refers to Permanent Secretary in the Department of Health, Chris Wormald, and "CabSec" was Sir Mark at the time.

"We have spoken out in favor of it publicly and I will say, as I told the Prime Minister, that as an opposition leader, whom I tell everyone, I would follow the government's advice, please follow these rules."

He added, "You can argue why not five or why not six or seven – you have to go with a number that is backed by science and they say six and I think we should stick to that rule. "

Sir Keir said the ministers' "side of the deal" is to improve NHS Test and Trace and ensure more people self-isolate after new social restrictions were put in place.

Government tough tactics followed the cities last night as night owls had one last hurray before the rules and warm weather provided perfect conditions for social gatherings.

Sun-drenched areas like Bournemouth, Brighton and Nottingham were packed yesterday before tough new regulations to combat rising coronavirus infection rates went into effect.

But it came when officials urged young people to heed their warnings and remember the "importance of the rules" as the total number of cases in Covid continues to rise.

Around 3,330 coronavirus cases were reported today – an 11 percent increase over last Sunday. This is followed by 3,497 confirmed cases on Saturday and 3,539 cases on Friday.

Meanwhile, a report has found that up to 4.5 million people, who are most at risk from Covid, are being instructed to stay home under a new protection plan based on health, age and weight.

Letters with tailored advice are to be sent to individuals based on a new "risk model" that takes into account underlying health conditions, age, gender and weight.

It's being rolled out to areas with high rates of infection first, but a Whitehall source told The Sunday Telegraph, "If the rate is this worrying across England, we are ready to do it on a blanket basis."

In Bournemouth, sun worshipers lined streets and filled beaches to soak up the heat wave.

And in London, many went to bars and stood in close proximity despite the ongoing pandemic.

Many decided to push the boat out while they still could and went out for one last hurray before being confined to friend bubbles again.

Owain, 24, who had traveled to Brighton with friends from Guildford, Surrey on Saturday night, said: “This new rule means we can no longer go out as a group.

"It might even be after Christmas before we meet again, so we wanted to go out in style."

It was similar for families during the day yesterday. The Ledbetter family of Crawley, West Sussex, enjoyed Sunday lunch at the Brighton Music Hall.

Haydn Ledbetter (49), Mrs. Donna (45) and their two children joined three other friends and their families to form a group of 14.

They had taken over two benches to enjoy fish and chips in the sunshine.

Mr. Ledbetter, an airport worker, said: “In all fairness the government has made so many U-turns this summer that none of us trust them to make another good phone call.

"If the law is still in place at Christmas, I will definitely not obey it."

Before proceeding, Buckland warned the government to go further next week and introduce curfews.

In a round of interviews today, Police Minister Kit Malthouse said breaches of the rules should be reported to the authorities amid a backlash to draconian measures

In a round of interviews today, Police Minister Kit Malthouse said breaches of the rules should be reported to the authorities amid a backlash to draconian measures

Speaking to Skys Sophy Ridge on Sunday, he said, “I think, as you have seen, we have been very willing to move quickly where it is needed and where the evidence points us.

“I think there is a problem with social occasions and social events, and especially with young people who get together and sometimes have a little too much fun and forget the meaning of the rules.

"I think it would be idle for me to speculate about what action we might need to take as winter approaches."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is believed to be considering putting a curfew on restaurants, bars and pubs at 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. if local action fails to control the spread of the virus.

The move is based on a concern that social distancing compliance will decrease the more people consume alcohol.

It comes amid growing fears that the virus could rage across the UK again.

Yesterday, the UK recorded a total of more than 3,000 coronavirus cases for the second year in a row – the first time since mid-May that cases were above this level on consecutive days.

The government said there had been an additional 3,497 laboratory-confirmed cases in the UK as of 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, slightly fewer than the 3,539 cases recorded on Friday.

Peter Openshaw, professor of experimental medicine at Imperial College London, spoke about the surge in cases, saying a "trickle" of cases could become a "cascade" as the country faces a "hard lockdown".

Police were out on the streets in Birmingham today as the new coronavirus rule of six came into effect

Police were out on the streets in Birmingham today as the new coronavirus rule of six came into effect

People were out and about in the sunshine in Battersea, London today as the new coronavirus restrictions went into effect

People walking the streets of Leeds today amid a backlash to the draconian new curbs being imposed by ministers

People walking the streets of Leeds today amid a backlash to the draconian new curbs being imposed by ministers

The Sunseekers were at Leigh-on-Sea beach today after more than 3,000 coronavirus cases were recorded in the UK

The Sunseekers were at Leigh-on-Sea beach today after more than 3,000 coronavirus cases were recorded in the UK

The beaches were full today in Lyme Regis, Dorset as the country basks in a mini September heat wave

The beaches were full today in Lyme Regis, Dorset as the country basks in a mini September heat wave

He said, “I think everyone agrees that we really need to act very quickly now to keep this from growing exponentially.

“I think that's the main point that we have to act quickly because it's so much harder to get things like that under control when you're late.

"Even a few days may be pretty dangerous right now."

Former Chief Scientific Advisor and member of the Emergency (Sage) Scientific Advisory Group Sir Mark Walport has warned that the country is "on the verge of losing control of Covid-19".

When asked if he thought Sir Mark was correct, Prof. Openshaw said to Ridge, "Well, I think that is correct."

Police across the UK started cracking down on illegal parties last night as revelers struck the city over ceremonies.

Officials broke up house parties in Altrincham, Stockport and Flixton, all in Greater Manchester, on Saturday night, while Nottingham police attacked a gathering of 50 people in Lenton.

At the largest gathering, which officials reportedly broke up last night, a Greater Manchester police team evicted around 70 partygoers from a house in Mottram.

Police are also investigating an illegal rave that took place in the leafy Surrey village of Wisley.

Waterloo was much quieter today than it was before the pandemic, despite ministers urging people to return to their offices

Waterloo was much quieter today than it was before the pandemic, despite ministers urging people to return to their offices

Commuters at London Bridge today as the latest restrictions went into effect - with warnings that even tougher movements might be required if the falls don't fall

Commuters at London Bridge today as the latest restrictions went into effect – with warnings that even tougher movements might be required if the falls don't fall

Last hurray: a drinker in Leeds gives a thumbs up on Sunday night before the new restrictions go into effect this morning

Last hurray: a drinker in Leeds gives a thumbs up on Sunday night before the new restrictions go into effect this morning

Warm weather encouraged the drinkers to be enchanted for the night

A woman gives her friend a piggyback ride after a night out

Young men and women used the weekend as a last chance to celebrate before the Prime Minister introduced the hardline rules

Under Boris Johnson's harsh new measures, groups of more than six people can be broken up by the police who will be able to hand out £ 100 fines to those who break the rules.

This will double up to £ 3,200 for each repeat offense, and only schools, workplaces and a limited number of other locations are exempt.

Over the weekend, Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Conservative MPs Committee on the Backbench, described the rule as "extraordinarily harsh" and said it interfered with "right to normal family life".

Sir Graham told BBC Radio 4: “The new restrictions are obviously extremely strict. They are a very serious interference with people's normal personal freedom and also with their right to normal family life. We have a parliament that is supposed to make some decisions. I suspect in this case that if I am not satisfied with the explanations for a rule of six instead of eight or ten, or whether children should be included or excluded, people like me might well vote against if we a vote.

"But I suspect, given that the opposition parties were in favor of banning everyone for as long as possible and removing all of their freedoms at every opportunity that the government would actually very easily win."

Labor also supported a review of the rule to allow child liberation.

The Welsh minister warns of a full lockdown in weeks

Welsh ministers have warned that the UK could be back in full lockdown within a few weeks if the coronavirus surge is not curbed.

Vaughan Gething said today that the country is in a similar position to February and infections are increasing sharply.

The Minister of Health added: "We were under national lockdown the third week of March."

Mr Gething told BBC Radio Wales this morning that he wanted Britain to work together but Wales was ready to take steps of its own if necessary.

"We have a few weeks to get to a position where we can restore some of the soil by returning to effective social distancing and following the rules we put in place to save people's lives, or we will be forced to larger local lockdowns and the potential for another national lockdown, ”he said.

Rachel Reeves, Shadow Secretary of the Cabinet Office, said yesterday, “I think the simplicity of the rule of six is ​​useful, but I think the government needs to keep reviewing whether children need to be included in this rule or whether we can do more to bring families together. & # 39;

People with large families have also urged ministers to reconsider restrictions to keep young children out.

Sarah Pearson, 41, from Norwich has six children. The rule states that if as a group they meet someone outside of the family, they will be fined 100 pounds. She said: “We're being careful. It's another thing that separates them from friends. & # 39;

The move taken to combat the increasing spread of coronavirus came in yesterday in a government study that suggested the reproduction rate in England could be as high as 1.7.

Tim Robson, the Northeast's representative on the national Pubwatch program, expected police officers to closely monitor bars over the weekend to make sure they were working safely.

He said, "There is an expectation that everyone will have one major final seizure, but people are starting to get anxious and a lot of licensed premises have already been trapped by the police."

Mr. Robson, a former police officer, said it was up to licensees to manage their premises and prevent large groups from gathering unsafely.

He added, "There may be an increase in groups going out this weekend, but it will likely be in premises that don't have door surveillance and control."

Meanwhile, Newcastle upon Tyne's Public Health Director Eugene Milne has said he didn't think large numbers of people would be kidding in front of the tighter controls.

He told Tyne Tees TV News, "When the lockdown opened, there was a real fear that this might happen in the city and it didn't, so I think we can trust the people.

“The idea of ​​the rule of six is ​​to make it easier for people to know how to follow the instructions, and I think one of the big problems has been that the instructions have gradually become so complicated and specific to certain areas that it becomes very confusing for everyone. & # 39;

Living the Rule of Six: What Brits Can and Can't Do With New Covid Restrictions Going In Force Across Britain Today – With Pub Outings And Barbecue Evenings For Less Than Seven – But Up To 30 Are Allowed At Weddings

The British are faced with restrictions on their freedom today as England faces draconian innovations Coronavirus Restrictions amid a surge in infections.

Boris Johnson sent shock waves across the country last week when he announced a ban on groups of more than six people from meeting in what he called the "rule of six".

Before the new restrictions, the British would hit pubs, parks and beaches on weekends for one last hangout with friends and family.

The strict ban goes into effect across England today to counter rising coronavirus infection rates by restricting indoor and outdoor meetings, including private homes, parks, pubs and restaurants.

An army of "Covid Secure Marshals" will patrol the streets, stopping barbecues, book clubs, picnics and pub lunches if they see more than six people together.

The marshals can call the police who will fine people up to £ 3,200 for breaking the rules.

Similar rules apply in Wales, although groups of 30 people can still meet outdoors, while Nicola Sturgeon has stated that she cannot rule out changing the number of people allowed to congregate in Scotland.

Here we outline exactly what the new restrictions mean for people living in England …

Boris Johnson sent shock waves across the country last week when he announced a ban on groups of more than six people from meeting in what he called the "rule of six".

Boris Johnson sent shock waves across the country last week when he announced a ban on groups of more than six people from meeting in what he called the "rule of six".

Before the new restrictions, the British would hit pubs, parks and beaches on weekends for one last hangout with friends and family. In the picture, people enjoying a drink outside a pub in Camden yesterday

Before the new restrictions, the British would hit pubs, parks and beaches on weekends for one last hangout with friends and family. In the picture, people enjoying a drink outside a pub in Camden yesterday

What are the basics?

In England no more than six people are allowed together – with a few exceptions, including weddings, funerals and baptisms, sports games, school attendance and work.

Anyone who breaks these new restrictions could be fined £ 100, which doubles to £ 3,200 for each new incident.

The law could stay in place for months, creating fears that it could ruin Christmas for millions.

Are the rules the same in other parts of the UK?

No

A new law has come into force restricting social gatherings in Scotland to a maximum of six people from two households.

The rules apply both indoors and outdoors – also in houses, gardens, pubs and restaurants.

Up to now, up to eight people from three houses have been allowed to meet inside and 15 from five households outside.

Children under the age of 12 do not count towards the total of the “rule of six” in Scotland or Wales.

In Wales, up to 30 people can meet outdoors. People in Wales can only meet indoors in groups of six or fewer and must all belong to the same extended household group.

Up to four households can join together to form an extended household. However, children under the age of 12 are exempt from tax and are not included.

While it is legal to meet five friends from five different households, the guide advises against it

Rule of six: The new rules at a glance

FAMILY AND HOUSEHOLDS

OUT: All gatherings of more than six people are illegal, which endangers the traditional family Christmas.

A family of five can only meet one grandparent at a time, while families of six or more are prohibited from meeting anyone.

It doesn't matter how many different households meet, as long as they stick to the rule of six.

Six people from six different households can come together, but two four-person households cannot.

ON: The only exception is when a household or support bubble consists of more than six people.

Support bubbles allow adults who live alone – as well as single parents – to join another household.

SOCIALIZATION

OUT: All social gatherings of more than six people – whether book club, dinner party or picnic – are prohibited.

The police will have the power to break into larger groups in parks, pubs and private homes.

An army of “Covid Marshals” is being recruited by the councils to step up enforcement, patrol city centers, parks, malls and train stations, and encourage large groups to break up.

People in groups of seven or more face a fine of £ 100, which doubles to a maximum of £ 3,200 for each repeated offense.

OUT: Pubs or restaurants cannot accommodate more than six people at one table. Restaurants can still accommodate more than six people, but each group must be separate and safe from one another.

For example, a group of eight friends cannot circumvent the restriction by booking two neighboring tables of four.

And you can't go to a pub in one group and then join another group. Venues will be fined £ 1,000 for failing to comply with the rules.

Pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and cinemas are required to record the names and contact details of all customers, visitors and employees for 21 days.

RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES

ON: Churches, synagogues, mosques and temples remain open, although the communities must be at least one meter apart.

ON: Wedding ceremonies and receptions are exempt from the new rules. Up to 30 guests are allowed, but must sit or stand one meter apart.

ON: Funerals are also excluded, 30 people are allowed.

SPORTS

ON: Gyms, leisure centers, and swimming pools will remain open as long as they are "Covid Safe" and enforce social distancing rules. Yoga or exercise classes with more than six people are allowed.

ON: Popular sport remains largely unaffected. Recreational sports such as soccer, cricket, rugby, and park runs can continue as long as they comply with the protocols. But teams with more than six players cannot have a beer together after the game.

ON: Professional sports and elite training can continue. Pilot events to reintroduce fans to stadiums can continue, but with a limit of 1,000 spectators.

SCHOOLS, CHILD CARE AND OFFICES

ON: Schools and universities are not affected by the new rules. However, you must continue to work according to the existing guidelines.

ON: Youth groups, registered childcare and playgroups are exempt from the rule of six.

OUT: The rules also apply outside of these settings, so that a group of ten school friends cannot go from the classroom to a park or seven colleagues cannot go from the office to the pub.

PROTESTS

ON: Protests can be conducted in groups of more than six people, provided they are "Covid-safe".

Can I have more than five friends out for a barbecue or go to a friend's birthday party?

No. The six-person rule still applies to barbecues, birthday parties and similar gatherings.

While it is legal to meet five friends from five different households, the guide does not recommend it.

Can I stay with my friend?

The new measures did not explicitly prohibit overnight stays, although the six-person rule still applies.

Previous government guidelines recommend that individuals and members of their household or support bubble should only stay overnight with their own household and another household.

This can be done in each other's homes or in other accommodations such as hotels or apartments.

What about outdoor raves?

Massen-Outdoor-Raves von mehr als sechs Personen sind nach den aktuellen Coronavirus-Beschränkungen nicht zulässig.

Es wurden Bedenken hinsichtlich des Haltens illegaler Raves im Zusammenhang mit „offensichtlichen Verstößen“ gegen Regeln zur Verhinderung der Ausbreitung einer Coronavirus-Infektion geäußert.

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, zeigte mit dem Finger auf 'Generation Z', weil er in einigen Fällen einen Anstieg ausgelöst hatte.

In einem direkten Appell an junge Menschen sagte Boris Johnson, dass sie ihr Verhalten "zum Wohle Ihrer Eltern" und der Gesundheit Ihrer Großeltern berücksichtigen sollten.

Prof. Whitty sagte, die Zahl der Coronavirus-Fälle sei in den letzten Tagen "viel schneller" gestiegen. Während die Zahlen bei älteren Menschen und Kindern "flach" blieben, gab es in anderen Altersgruppen "schnelle Aufwärtsbewegungen".

Er sagte, bei den 17- bis 18-Jährigen und den 19- bis 21-Jährigen seien die Zahlen seit Mitte August "wirklich ziemlich steil" gestiegen.

Er sagte, dass Daten darauf hindeuten, dass Großbritannien ohne Maßnahmen auf einem „extrem ähnlichen“ Weg wie Frankreich sein würde, wo die Zahlen weiter gestiegen sind – und warnte davor, dass die Situation bis zum Frühjahr wahrscheinlich gefährlich sein würde.

Die neuen Regeln kommen, nachdem die Zahl der täglich positiven Covid-19-Fälle in Großbritannien auf fast 3.000 gestiegen ist – Zahlen, die seit Mai nicht mehr gesehen wurden.

Die Minister hoffen, dass die Gesetzesänderung es der Polizei erleichtern wird, illegale Versammlungen zu identifizieren und aufzubrechen.

Warum wird die neue Maßnahme eingeführt?

Die Infektionsraten sind ziemlich schnell gestiegen, was den Chefarzt Professor Chris Whitty dazu veranlasste, zu sagen, dass die Nation unter diesen Umständen "noch nicht in Schwierigkeiten ist, aber auf Schwierigkeiten zusteuert".

Die Inzidenz von Coronaviren ist in der letzten Woche von 12,5 auf 19,7 pro 100.000 gestiegen, und die Zahlen deuten darauf hin, dass die R-Zahl über 1 liegt.

Die Fälle treten am häufigsten in der Altersgruppe der 19- bis 21-Jährigen auf, es besteht jedoch die Sorge, dass sich der Anstieg bei jüngeren Menschen dann schnell durch verschiedene ältere Altersgruppen bewegt.

Andere Warnsignale sind auch ein Anstieg des Prozentsatzes positiver Tests, der nicht auf weitere Tests zurückzuführen ist.

Wo gelten die neuen Regeln?

Die Regeln gelten in ganz England für alle Altersgruppen und in jeder Umgebung, sowohl drinnen als auch draußen, zu Hause oder in einer Kneipe.

Premierminister Boris Johnson sagte, es sei sicherer, sich im Freien zu treffen, und die Menschen sollten Abstand zu allen halten, mit denen sie nicht zusammenleben, auch wenn sie enge Freunde oder Familienmitglieder sind.

Er sagte, die Menschen dürften sich nicht in Gruppen von mehr als sechs Personen sozial treffen – und wenn Sie dies tun, werden Sie gegen das Gesetz verstoßen.

Was werden die Strafen für Verstöße gegen die Regeln sein?

Herr Johnson sagte, dass die neuen Regeln von der Polizei durchgesetzt werden und jeder, der gegen sie verstößt, Gefahr läuft, "zerstreut, bestraft und möglicherweise verhaftet" zu werden.

Die Nichteinhaltung der neuen Regeln kann eine Geldstrafe von 100 GBP bedeuten, die sich bei jeder weiteren Straftat auf 3.200 GBP verdoppelt.

Was ist mit religiöser Anbetung?

Kultstätten wie Kirchen, Synagogen und Moscheen bleiben geöffnet, aber die Gemeinden müssen mindestens einen Meter voneinander entfernt sein.

Es wurden Bedenken hinsichtlich des Haltens illegaler Raves im Zusammenhang mit „offensichtlichen Verstößen“ gegen Regeln zur Verhinderung der Ausbreitung einer Coronavirus-Infektion laut (Dateibild, 2010).

Es wurden Bedenken hinsichtlich der Abhaltung illegaler Raves wegen „offensichtlicher Verstöße“ gegen Regeln zur Verhinderung der Ausbreitung einer Coronavirus-Infektion laut (Datei, 2010).

Kann ich mich mit Freunden zu einem Kickabout treffen?

Yes. Organisierte Mannschaftssportarten sind von der neuen Maßnahme ausgenommen, sofern sie auf Coronavirus-sichere Weise durchgeführt werden.

Fußball, Cricket und Rugby können fortgesetzt werden, sofern die richtigen Covid-Secure-Protokolle vorhanden sind.

Für einzelne Sportarten wie Tennis und Golf müssen Versammlungen der Sechs-Personen-Regel entsprechen, und Protokolle müssen weiterhin befolgt werden.

Die neuen Regeln sehen jedoch ausdrücklich vor, dass "organisierte" Mannschaftssportarten durchgeführt werden können, was bedeutet, dass informelle Zusammenkünfte von mehr als sechs Freunden möglicherweise nicht zulässig sind.

Organisierte Mannschaftssportarten sind von der neuen Maßnahme ausgenommen, sofern sie auf eine Coronavirus-sichere Weise durchgeführt werden

Organisierte Mannschaftssportarten sind von der neuen Maßnahme ausgenommen, sofern sie auf Coronavirus-sichere Weise durchgeführt werden

Die Richtlinien vom August besagen, dass Einzelpersonen alleine, mit Mitgliedern ihres Haushalts oder mit bis zu fünf anderen Personen von außerhalb ihres Haushalts trainieren können.

Bis zu zwei Haushalte durften sich drinnen oder draußen in Gruppen von mehr als sechs Personen versammeln, sofern Mitglieder verschiedener Haushalte die Richtlinien zur sozialen Distanzierung befolgten.

Ansonsten waren Versammlungen von mehr als sechs Personen im Innen- oder Außenbereich nicht gestattet, es sei denn, dies war für Arbeitszwecke wesentlich.

Kann ich Mitglieder meiner Großfamilie haben?

Die Sechs-Personen-Regel gilt weiterhin, was bedeutet, dass eine dreiköpfige Familie drei Verwandte treffen könnte.

Die Regel bedeutet jedoch, dass Haushalte mit sechs Personen keine Verwandten haben können, es sei denn, sie befinden sich innerhalb derselben „Unterstützungsblase“.

Die Sechs-Personen-Regel gilt weiterhin, was bedeutet, dass eine dreiköpfige Familie drei Verwandte treffen könnte. Die Regel bedeutet jedoch, dass Haushalte mit sechs Personen keine Verwandten haben können, es sei denn, sie befinden sich innerhalb derselben „Unterstützungsblase“.

Die Sechs-Personen-Regel gilt weiterhin, was bedeutet, dass eine dreiköpfige Familie drei Verwandte treffen könnte. Die Regel bedeutet jedoch, dass Haushalte mit sechs Personen keine Verwandten haben können, es sei denn, sie befinden sich innerhalb derselben „Unterstützungsblase“.

Was ist, wenn ich in einer Unterstützungsblase bin?

Diejenigen, die in einem Haushalt leben, können sich mit einem anderen zusammenschließen, um eine „Unterstützungsblase“ zu bilden, vorausgesetzt, einer der Haushalte hat nur einen Erwachsenen.

Sie dürfen nur eine Unterstützungsblase verwenden – was als Haushalt gilt, was bedeutet, dass Sie sich treffen können, selbst wenn insgesamt sieben Personen in der Blase / im Haushalt zusammen sind.

Was sind die Regeln für Sex?

Richtlinien empfehlen, dass Sie sich sozial von Personen in einem anderen Haushalt fernhalten sollten, wenn möglich zwei Meter voneinander entfernt, oder einen Meter mit anderen Maßnahmen.

Technisch gesehen verstößt Sex oder Kuscheln gegen die Richtlinien, obwohl Sie nicht dafür bestraft werden können, dass Sie es missachten.

Potenzielle Sexualpartner sollten Covid-19 besprechen und fragen, ob sie oder jemand in ihrem Haushalt Symptome hatten oder positiv getestet wurden.

Was ist, wenn mehr als sechs Personen in meinem Haushalt sind?

Das Sechs-Personen-Limit gilt nicht für einen bestimmten Haushalt, wenn es größer als sechs Personen ist, sondern für diejenigen, die Personen von außerhalb Ihres Haushalts treffen.

Die Regel von sechs gilt für Versammlungen, wenn Sie Personen von außerhalb Ihres Haushalts treffen.

Kann ich noch heiraten?

Hochzeiten, Beerdigungen und organisierte Mannschaftssportarten sind von den neuen Beschränkungen ausgenommen, sofern sie auf sichere Weise mit Coronaviren durchgeführt werden.

Zeremonien und Empfänge dürfen mit bis zu 30 Teilnehmern durchgeführt werden – vorausgesetzt, es finden Coronavirus-Maßnahmen statt.

Gäste sollten Gesichtsmasken tragen, aber Braut und Bräutigam können darauf verzichten.

Covid-19 Sichere Veranstaltungsorte wie Kultstätten können immer noch insgesamt eine größere Anzahl beherbergen, aber Gruppen von bis zu sechs Personen dürfen keine größeren Gruppen mischen oder bilden.

Zeremonien und Empfänge dürfen mit bis zu 30 Teilnehmern durchgeführt werden – vorausgesetzt, es finden Coronavirus-Maßnahmen statt

In den Richtlinien der Regierung zu Hochzeiten heißt es: „Die Teilnehmer sollten nach Möglichkeit sitzen bleiben, um Sicherheitsmaßnahmen zur sozialen Distanzierung zu unterstützen.

„Sie sollten an wichtigen Punkten während der Veranstaltungen daran erinnert werden, soziale Distanz aufrechtzuerhalten und physischen Kontakt mit Personen aus verschiedenen Haushalten zu vermeiden.

„Teilnehmer und Mitarbeiter werden nachdrücklich aufgefordert, eine Gesichtsbedeckung zu tragen, wenn soziale Distanzierung schwierig sein kann und wenn sie mit Personen in Kontakt kommen, die sie normalerweise nicht treffen. Dies entspricht den Richtlinien für Gesichtsbedeckungen.

„Veranstaltungsmanager sollten Händedesinfektionsmittel an geeigneten Stellen im gesamten Veranstaltungsort bereitstellen und die Teilnehmer dazu ermutigen, es zu verwenden.

"Teilnehmer, einschließlich Kinder, sollten ihre Hände den ganzen Tag über häufig 20 Sekunden lang gründlich mit fließendem Wasser und Seife waschen oder Händedesinfektionsmittel verwenden, um sicherzustellen, dass alle Teile der Hände bedeckt sind."

Was ist mit Beerdigungen?

Trauernde können sich immer noch mit bis zu 30 Teilnehmern zu Trauergottesdiensten versammeln.

Bestattungsunternehmer haben zuvor gesagt, dass die Räte die Sperrregeln falsch interpretiert haben, indem sie Familienmitgliedern verboten haben, Friedhöfe und Krematorien zu besuchen.

Matt Hancock sagte später, er bedauere den Umzug, weil dies dazu führte, dass viele Menschen nicht an den Beerdigungen ihrer Lieben teilnehmen konnten, selbst wenn sie seit 50 Jahren verheiratet waren.

Kann ich trotzdem in ein Restaurant gehen?

Ausflüge in Pubs, Restaurants und Cafés sind weiterhin gestattet – die Sechs-Personen-Regel gilt jedoch weiterhin.

Die Beschränkung auf sechs Personen gilt für die Gruppen dieser Treffen – nicht für den gesamten Veranstaltungsort.

Sichere Covid-19-Veranstaltungsorte wie Kultstätten, Restaurants und Gaststätten können immer noch eine größere Anzahl beherbergen, aber Gruppen von bis zu sechs Personen dürfen keine größeren Gruppen mischen oder bilden.

Ausflüge in Pubs, Restaurants und Cafés sind weiterhin gestattet – die Sechs-Personen-Regel gilt jedoch weiterhin

Diese Regel gilt nicht für einzelne Haushalte oder Unterstützungsblasen von mehr als sechs Personen, die sich noch versammeln können.

In den Richtlinien der Regierung heißt es: „Wo immer möglich, sollten die Mitarbeiter alle Speisen und Getränke servieren, um die Selbstbedienung der Kunden zu minimieren. Entsprechend den Richtlinien für Restaurants, Pubs, Bars und Imbissbuden sollten die Teilnehmer sitzen bleiben.

„Die Sitzordnung sollte den Richtlinien zur sozialen Distanzierung folgen, was bedeutet, dass höchstens zwei Haushalte (einschließlich etwaiger Unterstützungsblasen) zusammen sitzen und die soziale Distanzierung zwischen diesen Gruppen aufrechterhalten wird.

"Tischservice im Freien ist ebenfalls vorzuziehen."

Kann ich trotzdem mit Freunden in die Kneipe gehen?

Yes, as above, but each table will not be able to seat more than six people, despite several groups being allowed into Covid-secure pubs.

Boris Johnson said the number of people who can attend social gatherings will be slashed to six in England from Monday and venues will have to keep records to help with testing and tracing efforts.

Under the new rules, venues will now be 'legally required' to take and keep the contact details of a member from every group of visitors for 21 days.

This is so they can pass them on to NHS Test and Trace 'without delay' if needed.

The hospitality venue could face a fine if it fails to stick to the Covid security standards and the Government pledged to back local authorities to make 'further and faster use of their powers' against venues who break the rules.

Pubs, restaurants and similar businesses are now legally obligated to collect customers' details to aid with contact tracing.

English residents will still be allowed to go to the pub, but each table will not be able to seat more than six people, despite several groups being allowed into Covid-secure pubs

Can I still take the bus or train?

Yes, as the limit does not apply to strangers gathering in the same space, such as a train or bus.

Government guidelines say: 'You can help control coronavirus and travel safely by walking and cycling, if you can.

'However, where this is not possible, you can use public transport or drive.

'If you do use public transport, you must wear a face covering and you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.'

Should my child go to school?

The government has not introduced any new rules for schools in the new measures, meaning existing guidance – that children should still attend classrooms – still stands.

Can I still go to university?

Yes. The six person does not apply to gatherings for educational purposes, such as university lectures.

Should I still go to work?

The Government says yes. The six person limit does not apply to gatherings for work.

Offices should take steps to ensure social distancing is maintained.

When will the measures end?

An end date to the new law has not been set.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock says they will last for the 'foreseeable future', and will only be withdrawn after the implementation of a vaccine or better mass testing.

.(tagsToTranslate)dailymail(t)news(t)Coronavirus(t)Downing Street