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Where is YOUR city in the UK Coronavirus Recovery Index?


UK recovery index below and top ten

Slowest to recover (restoration value of the Center for Cities in brackets)

London – (23)

Edinburgh – (27)

Cardiff – (29)

Oxford – (33)

Manchester – (34)

Liverpool – (38)

Birmingham – (38)

Leeds – (42)

Glasgow – (42)

Norwich – (48)

Fastest to recover (city center recovery score in brackets)

Basildon – (104)

Birkenhead- (103)

Chatham – (95)

Burnley – (93)

Doncaster – (83)

Southend – (83)

Telford – (83)

Mansfield – (82)

Wigan – (82)

Aldershot- (81)

London lags behind on phone mobility data and is at the bottom of the UK city center's “recovery index” as office workers who normally commute to the city stay at home – but commuter city trips have returned.

Despite Boris Johnson's plea for office workers to return to work, many of the country's largest companies, including RBS, Google and Facebook, will give their employees the opportunity to work from home for the foreseeable future, meaning that city centers, in particular London, will likely be deserted for some time.

There is an enthusiasm for continuing to work from home with a significant number of employers and workers, and executives recognize that savings can be made by reducing office space requirements while employees spend more time with their families.

A think tank called "Center for Cities" has created a country-wide ranking of UK city centers based on their current visitor frequency compared to pre-closure values ​​where London is at the bottom, closely followed by Edinburgh.

In contrast, traditional commuter cities such as Basildon in Essex, Wigan, and Chatham have seen a recovery in visitor numbers as the lockout is eased and residents who would normally commute travel to their hometowns.

Paul Swinney, director of politics and research at the Center for Cities, said: “The size of London and the ability of many office workers to continue working from home are probably the main reasons for the slowest recovery after the closure.

"A lower proportion of private car owners is likely to be an additional factor as many people are still unwilling to use public transportation to get to the center."

Compared to a benchmark in January, 33% fewer people are walking and 39% fewer passengers in public transport in London, while the number of drivers is back to normal, according to Apple.

In contrast, the UK saw a 16% increase in car travel overall and a slight 3% drop in the number of hikers.

London normally attracts 30 million visitors a year, which is why the decline in tourism and commuter travel is particularly hard hit.

This is illustrated by numbers that show the number of visitors on main streets. This shows that almost half of the non-resident visitors had come from outside the capital before the closure, compared with only 23% now.

Commuter cities like Basildon attracted far fewer visitors, so visitor numbers decreased less dramatically after the closure, as many residents stopped traveling to work and stayed at home instead.

Additional research by the think tank shows that the majority of office workers across the country are still unwilling to return, but are even less likely to do so if they live in major cities.

In contrast, according to the Center for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), there is considerable enthusiasm for remote working. One in three office employees said they wanted to stay home after the corona virus.

Pablo Shah, a senior economist at CEBR, said: “This seismic shift, which takes place in months rather than decades, will change the worlds of property, transportation, retail, leisure and, not least, fashion. That would not have been possible ten years ago. & # 39;

The study also found that in 2021, between 25 and 30 percent of employees will be working from home in one day.

This graph shows the number of people on main streets compared to the benchmark prior to the 100 blockage. This shows that the number of people visiting city centers in Basildon is growing faster than in London. Basildon is also recovering faster than the UK average, although the difference in the graphics seems very subtle

London: The data for the capital show that the number of trips from the suburbs to the city has decreased dramatically

London: The data for the capital show that the number of trips from the suburbs to the city has decreased dramatically

These graphs - based on Apple data - show the increase or decrease in the number of people driving, walking or using public transport compared to a benchmark from January. London has generally recovered more slowly than most other major cities, although the number of road trips has returned to normal

These graphs – based on Apple data – show the increase or decrease in the number of people driving, walking or using public transport compared to a benchmark from January. London has generally recovered more slowly than most other major cities, although the number of road trips has returned to normal

In the UK's 10 largest cities, only 14 percent of employees returned to work, while in cities like Gloucester 30 percent returned because they were more likely to go to the office.

Only one in eight workers in London returned to the office in July, compared to nearly 50 percent in Basildon.

Only 800 of Goldman Sachs' 6,000 London employees have returned to the city, while fewer than 2,000 of JPMo's 12,000 have returned.

The decline in numbers is a major concern for downtown businesses, such as cafes, pubs and restaurants, where the majority of their customers are local workers.

Companies across the country are limited due to lack of space and can only bring a fraction of their workforce back to the office if they want to maintain social distance between workers.

The consequence of this is that cafes, pubs and shops that rely on office staff fear they will be pushed out of business.

Paul Swinney, director of politics and research at the Center for Cities, told MailOnline: “Low visitor numbers in the city center are very detrimental to the hospitality and service sectors, which depend on office workers' habits. Shops, restaurants and pubs are unlikely to return to normal habits until people return to their offices. & # 39;

Official figures showed that GDP grew 1.8 percent in May, although it is still almost a quarter lower than it was before the introduction of the draconian coronavirus restrictions. In this graph, 100 represents the size of the economy in 2016

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