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Where are they hiding Tough, remote country where presumably Canadian suspects live


The vast area of ​​the rugged country, which is believed to be home to two young Canadian murder suspects, is dangerous, difficult to navigate, and full of swamps, bugs, and abandoned huts.

Kam McLeod (19) and Bryer Schmegelsky (18) have been on the run since July 15 when they are accused of killing Lucas Fowler (24) and Chynna Deese (23) in British Columbia.

Since then, they have moved east and travel almost half the width of Canada to the Province of Manitoba.

They were seen twice in the extremely remote town of Gillam earlier this week and have since gone down and tossed the car they were traveling overboard.

Gillam has only 1,265 inhabitants, who are mainly made up of employees of a local dam and their families. There is only one road leading in and the nearest town is 35 miles away.

The police are now preparing to go door to door asking residents for information.

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Still on the run: Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky are hunted by the Canadian police

This is the remote part of Manitoba, Canada, where Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod are believed to be hiding

This is the remote part of Manitoba, Canada, where Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod are believed to be hiding

Only one road leads to the tiny town of Gillam (see picture), which is now blocked

Only one road leads to the tiny town of Gillam (see picture), which is now blocked

An aerial view of northwestern Manitoba shows that the giant forest police are now looking for the couple

An aerial view of northwestern Manitoba shows that the giant forest police are now looking for the couple

For the next 72 hours, officials will be leading door-to-door screens hoping to generate new tips.

& # 39; residents can be sure that we will activate all the necessary resources … (but) they are examining the possibility that they have accidentally received assistance in leaving the area.

"They may have changed their looks … it is important that all Canadians remain vigilant," said corporal Julie Courchaine.

There are major police efforts to find them, but with thousands of miles of forest, swamp and baron lands to comb, it remains to be seen when the couple will be found.

It can be quite difficult to survive out there without good supplies.

Gillam Deputy Mayor John MacDonald

Manitoba's northwest pocket, where it is said to be, is a rugged landscape.

There is only one street in and out of town that is now cordoned off with police checkpoints.

The boys are not believed to have stolen another car, making the police believe that they are walking.

It is unclear what stocks they may have and where they seek protection.

Residents who say the city is surrounded by abandoned huts are now afraid of breaking into one of these houses, if not their own houses.

The police search all abandoned buildings they come across. Cpl. Cochraine said the country was "dense" and "hard" even for the officers.

However, there is not much protection beyond the city.

"There isn't a lot of protection out there. You could choose a direction and go in and hope to find something," said Gillam's deputy mayor, John MacDonald, adding, "It can be pretty difficult out there without a good one Survival supply.

"None of us would want to be put in this situation."

The Canadian police, who use sniffer dogs, are combing the area for clues

The Canadian police, who use sniffer dogs, are combing the area for clues

The search for the couple continued on Friday. The police shared these photos of their efforts

The search for the couple continued on Friday. The police shared these photos of their efforts

The Royal Canadian Mountain Police gets on a helicopter on Friday to search for the two teenagers

The Royal Canadian Mountain Police gets on a helicopter on Friday to search for the two teenagers

This map shows the movements of young people in the past few days and where the murders took place last week

The Canadian mountain police use tactical teams to find the couple, and have used drones and infrared technology, as well as search parties

The Canadian mountain police use tactical teams to find the couple, and have used drones and infrared technology, as well as search parties

The police are planning their strategy to find the couple on Thursday while the hunt for them continues

The police are planning their strategy to find the couple on Thursday while the hunt for them continues

Armed police officers are now peering through the countryside in teams. Bryer's father believes they will be shot if they haven't killed themselves yet

Armed police officers are now peering through the countryside in teams. Bryer's father believes they will be shot if they haven't killed themselves yet

The boys are believed to be walking on foot after lighting their car (see Monday), after seeing their faces in the media

The boys are believed to be walking on foot after lighting their car (see Monday), after seeing their faces in the media

To narrow their search, they use drones and are likely using infrared technology to scan the landscape for warmth.

"You don't know where exactly these two are. You might be a few feet away from them and you don't know.

"It happens all the time when police officers are in a security container and the suspects were only a few meters away from them at the end of the day and they just couldn't see it," he said.

"When they see movement, when an infrared from the air sees a source of heat that looks really good and is not an animal … footprints or clothes or garbage," Jack Schonely, a former police officer, told CBC.

The police in Manitoba have not disclosed the exact size of their search scope and are not asking questions.

The huge Hudson Bay, which lies at the tip of the northwest of Manitoba. The boys are experienced campers, one of their fathers said, but the conditions in which they find themselves would test for everyone

The huge Hudson Bay, which lies at the tip of the northwest of Manitoba. The boys are experienced campers, one of their fathers said, but the conditions in which they find themselves would test for everyone

A top view of the country in Manitoba is shown. Much of the province is similarly large and sparse

A top view of the country in Manitoba is shown. Much of the province is similarly large and sparse

On Thursday, a spokeswoman for the troop said it had brought help from other departments in western Canada and used all the necessary means to find the boys.

Bryer's father Alan said that he believes that the police are shooting them and that they want to "go out in a glory of glory".

He also said how his son likes to play military-style strategy-based video games.

However, the teenager's mother gave him an emotional plea on Thursday and asked him to report.

What may have driven them to murder remains a mystery.

The two teenagers, who are childhood friends, left Vancouver Island in search of better jobs, they told their parents.

How they encountered their alleged victims or even acquired the weapons they would have needed to kill them is unknown.

Gillam residents were warned not to approach any of the boys when they saw them.

They are considered dangerous and are probably still armed.

Everyone who saw the couple was told to call 911 or the local police.

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