ENTERTAINMENT

When you do some housework, you can undo the damage caused by being stuck to your desk


If you're doing some housework or taking a half-hour walk, you can fix the damage caused by being stuck to your desk for up to ten hours

  • The study showed that more than ten hours of inactivity increases the likelihood of death
  • Just 30 to 40 minutes of moderate activity a day will greatly reduce the risk
  • Around 44,000 people from four countries were examined for up to 14 years
  • Those who were inactive for ten hours but exercised were not at increased risk

Doing housework every day or taking a brisk walk can help repair the damage caused by sitting at a desk for hours, according to the new guidelines from the World Health Organization.

The advice on "sedentary behavior" is becoming more relevant to the millions stuck at home due to Covid restrictions.

It is based on a study that shows that ten or more hours of inactivity per day is associated with a significantly increased risk of death.

But just 30 to 40 minutes of moderate-to-high-intensity physical activity a day significantly reduces that risk, the study found.

Around 44,000 people from four countries, each wearing activity trackers, were examined by scientists between the ages of four and 14.

If you only do half an hour of housework, the risk of death can be significantly reduced if you sit still for ten hours a day (file image).

The advice on "sedentary behavior" is becoming more relevant to the millions stuck at home due to Covid restrictions. Pictured shoppers on November 22nd in Reading, Berkshire

The advice on "sedentary behavior" is becoming more relevant to the millions stuck at home due to Covid restrictions. Pictured shoppers on November 22nd in Reading, Berkshire

Those who spent about ten hours or more a day without exercise – and did not move much – had a 263 percent increased risk of death compared to those who exercised and were inactive for no more than eight hours a day.

But those who were inactive ten hours a day – but also did decent daily exercise – had no "statistically significant" increased risk of death.

Researchers, led by the Norwegian School of Sports Science, emphasized all physical activities. It can be anything from climbing stairs to walking around the block – anything that increases a person's heart rate and breathing rate for an extended period of time.

Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis of the University of Sydney, who co-edited a special edition of the British Journal of Sports Medicine on the subject, said: “Although the new guidelines reflect the best science available, there are still some knowledge gaps. We're still not sure where exactly the "too much sitting" bar is. "

Researchers, led by the Norwegian School of Sports Science, emphasized all physical activities. Pedestrians in Covent Garden, London on November 22nd

Researchers, led by the Norwegian School of Sports Science, emphasized all physical activities. Pedestrians in Covent Garden, London on November 22nd

The guidelines state that everyone should aim for 150 to 300 minutes of moderate exercise per week – or 75 to 150 minutes of high-intensity physical activity. They are also recommended to do some muscle-strengthening activity at least twice a week and reduce sedentary behavior.

Professor Stamatakis said, "These guidelines are timely as we are in the middle of a global pandemic that has locked people indoors for a long time."

WHO Professor Fiona Bull said, “The latest global estimates show that one in four adults and more than three quarters of teenagers are failing to meet aerobic exercise recommendations.

"Therefore, governments urgently need to prioritize and invest in national initiatives and health and community services that encourage physical activity."

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