ENTERTAINMENT

Well that's a big gulp! The photographer captures the amazing moment when the gray heron devours the baby alligator


Well that's a big gulp! The photographer captures amazing images of the moment a gray heron devours the baby alligator

  • The gray heron celebrates its juvenile alligator in Lake Apopka in Florida
  • Incredible images of the bird eating the alligator were captured by Danny Gilliam
  • Photos were posted on Facebook, where they were shared 71,000 times
  • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission released a video of a similar event in 2017

A baby alligator in Florida was likely full of herons as it was devoured by a giant bird over the weekend.

Amazing pictures posted on Facebook on Sunday show a gray heron eating a large juvenile alligator in Florida's Apopka Lake.

The photos were posted on Facebook by Danny Gilliam. As of Tuesday, the viruses depicted went viral as they were shared more than 71,000 times and elicited around 11,000 responses.

A gray heron was photographed eating a juvenile alligator by a lake in Florida

Danny Gilliam took the photos while on a weekend trip to Florida's Lake Apopka

Danny Gilliam took the photos while on a weekend trip to Florida's Lake Apopka

The incredible pictures show the bird devouring the helpless alligator

The incredible pictures show the bird devouring the helpless alligator

In 2017, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute released a video of a heron devouring a baby alligator.

"Gray herons will eat almost anything within striking distance, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, insects, and other birds," wrote FWC.

“This large wader is a familiar sight to most Floridians.

"It is a permanent resident of wetlands across the state, often seen along ponds, lakes, and canals in housing developments."

As of Tuesday, Gilliam's images generated more than 71,000 shares

As of Tuesday, Gilliam's images generated more than 71,000 shares

The bird swallows the juvenile alligator in Florida's Apopka Lake

The bird swallows the juvenile alligator in Florida's Apopka Lake

The juvenile alligator was apparently too young to survive in the wild.

In the first few years of an alligator's life, they eat small animals and stay near the water. They survive on insects, snails, worms, birds and small fish.

The juvenile alligator stays with its mother for about three years before venturing out into the wild on its own.

After about four feet in length, the alligators are considered invulnerable in the wild.

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