TECHNOLOGY

Wade Robson wanted to benefit from Michael Jackson's allegations of sexual abuse with a scrapbook


Michael Jackson's prosecutor, Wade Robson, wanted to make money from a scrapbook exposing sexual abuse allegations against the King of Pop and wrote a personal note, "It's time to get mine!"

So desperate to bring his story to the world that Robson turned to a number of high-profile publishers who were demanding a "large amount of money" for the rights to the book, and even found that his story of abuse "related / relevant" to him would make & # 39; as a victim.

But when the publishers passed on his proposal, Robson frustratedly launched a failing $ 1.5 billion civil lawsuit asking for damages from the Michael Jackson estate.

And, according to DailyMail.com court documents, it took three years for real estate lawyers to notice his book project because Robson tried to hide it.

Michael Jackson's prosecutor, Wade Robson (pictured with Jackson as a child), wanted to make money from a scrapbook that exposed sexual abuse allegations against the King of Pop, and wrote a personal note that read, "It is time to get mine! " Bomb Court documents

The Australian dancer turned to a number of publishers who, according to court documents, were demanding a "large amount of money" for the rights to the book. In an email between Robson and his literary agent Alan Nevins on February 27, 2013, the subject line is titled

The Australian dancer turned to a number of publishers who, according to court documents, were demanding a "large amount of money" for the rights to the book. In an email between Robson and his literary agent Alan Nevins on February 27, 2013, the subject line is titled "Our Secret Project". Pictured: Robson appears on the Today Show in 2013

It is believed that the dance choreographer was not cooperative and hid drafts of the book before a judge took note of the dropped memoirs and ordered the dancer to provide all documents relevant to the case.

It is also alleged that Robson has repeatedly evaded requests to compile all communications relevant to the case and has heavily edited many of the messages he has created, including 50 emails with his mother.

Details of meticulous notes Robson has taken, draft books, and emails with an agent and publishers are also included in the legal dossier.

The documents shed new light on the Australian dancer's actions prior to filing the 2013 lawsuit.

And the revelations could further investigate Robson's abuse claims, which have already been scrutinized.

Attorney Vince Finaldi, who represents Robson and Safechuck in lawsuits where Jackson molested them, said the documents were "biased" and "unilateral".

"This is why we want a process so there are rules of evidence, rules for that process and a neutral fact finder under the supervision of a judge, and we want and we fight for that and we do it." I won't stop until we get it. & # 39;

He added: “These are comments written by the same lawyers who have defended this pedophile for over 30 years. They ran victim, they ran victim families, they apologized for this man and they made excuses for him for years. & # 39;

My history of abuse and its effects will make me understandable / relevant.

Robson – who admitted to lying under oath during Jackson's sexual abuse trial in 2005 – has often written his thoughts on paper, revealing that he had spent seven months of his life writing pages for his book.

In an email between Robson and his literary agent Alan Nevins on February 27, 2013, the subject line is titled "Our Secret Project".

In another August 2013 note, five months after the lawsuit was filed, Robson, vying to become a meditation teacher, wrote: "My history of abuse and its effects will relate / make me relevant."

During his dismissal, attorney Katherine Kleindienst asked him what he meant and Robson explained it away.

The now 36-year-old said, "I think that's the point the teacher was referring to as a meditation teacher … not everyone wants to learn meditation from the same type of person with the same life story.

"And that has to do with the fact that I went through trauma in my childhood and … that is one of the parts of my life that would connect me to a certain number of people who have had similar experiences in childhood. "

The documents also show that the writing of the book caused friction between Robson and his wife Amanda (shown together in 2005). Amanda had asked her husband if writing a book according to court documents

The documents also show that the writing of the book caused friction between Robson and his wife Amanda (shown together in 2005). Amanda had asked her husband whether writing a book was "the right thing" according to court documents

In February 2013, when publishers were considering his book proposal, Robson had recorded a note of his thoughts. He had written: “Amanda cannot stop me from doing what I want to do. Let me think about divorce. It makes me so angry. I have dedicated the last 7 months of my life to this idea of ​​the book. This path. Now are you trying to ask me if it's the right thing? «

In February 2013, when publishers were considering his book proposal, Robson had recorded a note of his thoughts. He had written: “Amanda cannot stop me from doing what I want to do. Let me think about divorce. It makes me so angry. I have dedicated the last 7 months of my life to this idea of ​​the book. This path. Now are you trying to ask me if it's the right thing? «

In another April 2015 note, Robson wrote "Writings of My Thoughts" and one sentence ended with the words, "It's time to get mine!"

But when asked in his statement what he meant by these words, he said he couldn't remember.

Neither of these backgrounds was known when Leaving Neverland aired on HBO for the first time, depicting the graphics of Robson and his co-defendant James Safechuck.

Both men claim Jackson sexually abused her as a child.

After the two-part documentary was broadcast, Oprah Winfrey interviewed both prosecutors for a show called "After Neverland," and Robson spoke of finding a platform to tell his story, but only talked about legal proceedings.

He said, "Nine months after I healed, the question was," Could I do something good with this bad thing? Is there a platform on which I could tell this story, on which they (the property) would have to listen and be held accountable? "" For me, it started there because one of these platforms is the legal system. "

But DailyMailTV found that it all started for Robson when he sat down at least an hour a day to write his life story to benefit from his connection to the superstar singer.

He then contacted Los Angeles-based agent Alan Nevins of Renaissance Literary and Talent to sign a book deal for US and British publishers in late 2012.

In a legal statement to Jackson Estate lawyers, Robson said he "started writing only for processing purposes".

This letter then turned into a draft for a book in the second half of 2012, he says.

The revelations will raise further doubts about the validity of Robson's abuse claims, which have already been scrutinized. Robson (left) was one of two main suspects in HBO's Leaving Neverland alongside James Safechuck (right).

The revelations will raise further doubts about the validity of Robson's abuse claims, which have already been scrutinized. Robson (left) was one of two main suspects in HBO's Leaving Neverland alongside James Safechuck (right).

In another April 2015 note, Robson wrote "Writings of My Thoughts" and one sentence ended with the words, "It's time to get mine!" (shown in the court record 2016). But when asked in his statement what he meant by these words, he said he couldn't remember

In another April 2015 note, Robson wrote "Writings of My Thoughts" and one sentence ended with the words, "It's time to get mine!" (shown in the court record 2016). But when asked in his statement what he meant by these words, he said he couldn't remember

He said he empowered Nevins to speak to publishers about securing a deal, but denies having ever discussed money.

According to the documents, Ms Kleindienst said to him about the estate: “When I called Mr. Nevins on the phone, he volunteered to me that you had asked for a large amount of money for your book. Are you saying that he's lying? & # 39;

"Tell me again what he said, what I said?" Robson asked.

"That you asked for a lot of money for your book."

"Not true," Robson replied, insisting that he gave no instructions on what to say to the publishers, other than "not wanting to be part of a book that focused on sensationalism."

However, a source close to the Robson family told DailyMailTV when Robson first talked about writing a book that he expected the deal to fund his vision for a nonprofit that aims to help victims of child abuse through therapy and meditation .

The dancer said that he did not remember whether written material had been sent to the publishers as part of his submission or whether he had authorized something to be sent.

However, emails to the court show that at least three publishers had read his words in some form.

Harper Collins, Pan Macmillan, Sidgwick and Jackson editors had checked the book proposal against an email list Robson had requested from his agent in February 2013. "So I know all the options that have been explored."

Later in the spring, all publishers passed the book on.

In May of the same year, Robson filed a lawsuit against the Jackson property and the actor's companies.

The documents also show that writing the book caused friction between Robson and his wife Amanda.

Amanda had asked her husband whether writing a book was "the right thing" according to court documents.

Robson had claimed for years that the megastar never touched him sexually or inappropriately, and kept his story - even towards his own mother - long after the singer's death in 2009

Robson had claimed for years that the megastar never touched him sexually or inappropriately, and kept his story – even towards his own mother – long after the singer's death in 2009

Robson - who admitted to lying under oath during Jackson's sexual abuse trial in 2005 - often wrote his thoughts on paper, revealing that he had devoted "seven months of my life" to writing pages for his book. Pictured: Jackson in 2005 in Santa Maria, California

Robson – who admitted to lying under oath during Jackson's sexual abuse trial in 2005 – often wrote his thoughts on paper, revealing that he had devoted "seven months of my life" to writing pages for his book. Pictured: Jackson in 2005 in Santa Maria, California

Robson went into therapy after suffering two nervous breakdowns allegedly caused by sexual abuse in Neverland (Image)

Robson went into therapy after suffering two nervous breakdowns allegedly caused by sexual abuse in Neverland (Image)

In February 2013, when publishers were considering his book proposal, Robson had recorded a note of his thoughts that was brought up by the estate's lawyers.

He had written: “Amanda cannot stop me from doing what I want to do. Let me think about divorce. It makes me so angry. I have dedicated the last 7 months of my life to this idea of ​​the book. This path. Now are you trying to ask me if it's the right thing? «

When asked about this note, Wade rejected the idea of ​​seriously considering divorce.

"Nothing more than a moment of emotional, angry moments, the thought came to my mind for a split second, but never beyond," he said.

"There were definitely such intense conversations, but I don't remember that she ever told me and suggested I don't."

When asked by lawyers why he had stopped doing book sales, Robson suggested that it was more his call than the publishers' lack of interest.

He said it would "not be as effective in this form … since I wanted the truth about Michael's sexual abuse to come out of me and help (others)."

The court documents also allege that when Robson was asked to provide "all written communications related to his allegations of abuse," he said under oath that there was only one document.

"However, documents obtained from third parties showed that Robson's affidavits were false," said Howard Weitzman, lawyer for the Jackson estate.

It is alleged that Robson later made several banker boxes full of messages that he previously claimed did not exist.

The document states that Robson "wrongly" claimed to have provided all the documents he had on three different occasions, but real estate lawyers found "clear evidence" that he was not telling the truth.

Robson said in the HBO documentary Leaving Neverland that after his 1993 agreement, he went to Michael Jackson's estate outside of Santa Barbara (via Robson on TV who defended Jackson in 1993).

Robson said in the HBO documentary Leaving Neverland that after his 1993 agreement, he went to Michael Jackson's estate outside of Santa Barbara (via Robson on TV who defended Jackson in 1993).

According to the records, one of Jackson's real estate lawyers said Robson said, "When I called Mr. Nevins on the phone, he volunteered to me that you had asked for a large amount of money for your book."

According to the records, one of Jackson's real estate lawyers said Robson said, "When I called Mr. Nevins on the phone, he volunteered to me that you had asked for a large amount of money for your book."

Weitzman added: "To date, Robson has not made numerous communications to third parties and has never explained why."

He continued that Robson had edited the "whole content" of numerous emails he had created for "plausible reason", including over 50 emails between him and his mother and another 20 to other family members.

"Many of these editorial offices are clearly inappropriate," explains Weitzman.

The documents cite an email exchange dated February 16, 2016 between Robson and his mother Joy under the subject "Security Certificate".

"Robson describes an alleged testimony from a former Neverland security officer that implies improper conduct on the part of the accused and asks his mother what she thinks," the document said.

Eight minutes later, Robson's mother replied, "Wow. None of this is true … & # 39;

The paperwork continues: "The rest of Ms. Robson's answer is (conveniently) hidden in the version she created, and Ms. Robson is now (conveniently) claiming that she no longer has access to this email, which is what the production is going through Robson makes himself critical. "

The documents add that Robson did not compose multiple emails from another conversation chain with his mother entitled "Questions to Mom".

Robson went into therapy after two nervous breakdowns, which he says were caused by sexual abuse in Neverland.

For years he had claimed that the megastar never touched him sexually or inappropriately, and kept his story – even towards his own mother – long after the singer's death in 2009.

He was the star witness to the defense when Michael Jackson was on trial and Jackson was acquitted of child abuse in 2005.

This new information became known after a judge in the Michael Jackson Estate lawsuit learned that Robson had "misrepresented" the status of the submission of the documents required by law to hand over the book.

The property first found out about the book project in October 2016.

The judge finally ordered all of the drafts, emails, attachments and documents related to the Robson book to be created. An estate application for forensic examination of the choreographer's computer was, however, refused.

Robson's lawsuit, which was later brought up by co-accused James Safechuck, was eventually thrown out of court.

Leaving Neverland, Robson and Safechuck accuse the King Of Pop of sexual abuse at Neverland Ranch for several years.

Jackson bought the Sycamore Ranch after falling in love with the place while filming Say Say Say with Paul McCartney.

As a big fan of Peter Pan, Jackson vowed to turn the house into a real never land.

The 2800-hectare estate – four times the size of Monaco – has 67,000 sycamore trees and features a sepia savannah that slopes down to a 3,000-foot peak that Jackson called Mount Katherine as a tribute to his mother.

In 2003, Jackson allowed British broadcaster Martin Bashir to film his daily life and interactions with children in Neverland.

In the interview, he defended "sleeping with children" as a natural part of his life.

However, two years later, cancer survivor Gavin Arvizo accused him of abusing him, which led to his child abuse trial in Santa Maria in 2005.

He was cleared up in every way, but never returned to Neverland.

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