ENTERTAINMENT

VINCE CABLE: The idea of ​​a circuit breaker is crude, lazy, and contrary to common sense


Until last week I thought Sir Keir Starmer was doing a great job pulling Labor out of the swamp Jeremy Corbyn dumped him in. But I'm afraid he'll regret his recent call for a new national lockdown

Until last week I thought Sir Keir Starmer was doing a great job pulling Labor out of the swamp Jeremy Corbyn dumped him in.

But I'm afraid he'll regret his recent call for a new national lockdown.

However, the opposition has much to criticize in the shambolic handling of the pandemic by the government and in the contradicting messages from the ministers.

The side of academics calling for a full national lockdown when the government ignored their advice appeared to be an open target for the Labor leader.

But a “breaker” that would restrict most of the country back to our homes, a measure the Prime Minister does not have to rule out yet, would defy common sense.

The collateral damage to health and the economy would be just devastating.

First off, it is rude and lazy to close pubs in Penzance and restaurants in Richmond because of the family transfer in Liverpool and Manchester. The operation is best performed with a scalpel, rather than an ax.

Countries like Germany have shown the way by isolating emerging clusters of infections. Japan's population is almost twice that of the UK, and people live closer together and are even older – a known risk factor for Covid-19.

Still, Japan has only suffered 1,600 deaths from the virus, compared to the UK's 43,000.

These other countries have strict track and trace systems, but our system has been a pathetic mistake that has cost taxpayers up to £ 12 billion.

A “breaker” that would restrict most of the country back to our homes, a measure the Prime Minister does not yet have to rule out, would defy common sense. The collateral damage to health and the economy would be just devastating. The people can be seen in Oxford Circus in London

A “breaker” that would restrict most of the country back to our homes, a measure the Prime Minister does not yet have to rule out, would defy common sense. The collateral damage to health and the economy would be just devastating. The people can be seen in Oxford Circus in London

I would forego the services of the unfortunate Dido Harding who oversaw this disaster. Instead, the Prime Minister should bring in someone with a military background who is familiar with managing complex systems on tight schedules.

If we don't solve this problem, infections will spike every few months, leading to gradual lockdowns, causing immense economic and social damage.

The government must also broaden the range of its scientific advice. The Sage Committee has over 50 members, some of whom are of great importance.

But I don't see any of them speaking out on behalf of the family doctors and hospital advisors who are experiencing an alarming escalation in cancer and heart disease as people delay seeking treatment and redirecting NHS resources to deal with the pandemic .

First off, it is rude and lazy to close pubs in Penzance and restaurants in Richmond because of the family transfer in Liverpool and Manchester. The operation is best performed with a scalpel, rather than an ax. The people can be seen in Manchester on Saturday night

First off, it is rude and lazy to close pubs in Penzance and restaurants in Richmond because of the family transfer in Liverpool and Manchester. The operation is best performed with a scalpel, rather than an ax. The people can be seen in Manchester on Saturday night

The mail highlighted the neglect of these deaths (and why has no one followed the Royal College of Surgeons' call to separate Covid and non-Covid hospitals)?

There is also no strong voice on the Committee of Wise Men who advocate for mental health.

This is unforgivable given the growing numbers of depression, addiction and suicide known to result from incarceration and isolation as a result of action against the virus.

After all, it is high time ministers paid more attention to economists who calculate the trade-offs between life and livelihood.

Part of the NHS, Nice, is assessing whether to pay for life-extending medication by coldly calculating the number of years of human life saved by these treatments relative to their cost.

I find it bizarre that the NHS health department doesn't seem to be able to make such assessments. The responsibility to work for the economy rests with Rishi Sunak.

The Chancellor has had a good Covid war so far. But the hero of the Spring Offensive is in danger of becoming the zero of the autumn retreat.

His panicked officials have told him to stop spending so much money to save the regions and sectors that have been damaged by action against the pandemic.

The Chancellor has had a good Covid war so far. But the hero of the Spring Offensive is in danger of becoming the zero of the autumn retreat

The Chancellor has had a good Covid war so far. But the hero of the spring offensive is in danger of becoming the zero of the autumn retreat

As a result, Mr. Sunak cannot give workers and businesses in the north the support they need to help offset a growing economic depression.

Andy Burnham, the Mayor of Manchester, and Steve Rotheram, his counterpart in Liverpool, are rightly angry about the lack of support in their regions.

But instead of just asking for more help, they are irrationally demanding that the rest of the country suffer for the way they are.

The International Monetary Fund has advised that countries like the UK that can borrow freely at negligible interest rates shouldn't be afraid of debt, but rather keep their economies going. The debt can be repaid in the coming decades.

Back in 1992, Bill Clinton was launched under the unofficial motto "It's the economy, stupid!" Elected as US President.

It is high time that Boris Johnson heeded this sentence – and avoided the dangerous urge for further bans at all costs.

Sir Vince Cable was Secretary of State for Economics from 2010 to 2015 and is now visiting professor at the London School of Economics

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Debate (t) Keir Starmer (t) Jeremy Corbyn