ENTERTAINMENT

Viewers praise Amanda and Clive Owen of Our Yorkshire Farm for their family of nine


Viewers fell in love with Channel 5's Our Yorkshire Farm again when the show aired a retrospective episode last night.

The series, which has aired since 2015, follows the lives of shepherds Amanda, 45, and Clive Owen, 66, and their nine-headed brood on their farm in Upper Swaledale.

The couple run the 2,000 acre tenant farm, where they manage their herd of around 1,000 sheep and run a B&B while they raise their free-range children – from three-year-old Nancy to 19-year-old Raven.

At 6ft 2in, Amanda was encouraged to pursue the same career path as her model mother, but hated the clothes and makeup she had to wear and was intrigued by the idea of ​​farming after discovering a book about shepherds.

She has since created her "dream life," and last night's show looked back at how the Owen family had evolved since the program aired five years ago. Viewers praised Amanda and Clive for the way they raised their family.

The family in 2015 when she starred in Ben Fogle's New Lives In The Wild. At the time, her oldest was the 14-year-old Raven and Clemmie was only five weeks old. They have since had their ninth child, three-year-old Nancy

Viewers were more impressed than ever after Channel 5 aired a five-year Our Yorkshire Farm special. They saw how the Owen family (pictured) has developed in the five years since the show started in 2015. (Amanda, 45, with Clive Owen, 66 and their nine children: Annas, Clemmie, Nancy, Rabe, Sidney, Miles, Violet, Edith and Reuben)

Viewers were more impressed than ever after Channel 5 aired a five-year Our Yorkshire Farm special. They saw how the Owen family (pictured) has developed in the five years since the show started in 2015. (Amanda, 45, with Clive Owen, 66 and their nine children: Annas, Clemmie, Nancy, Rabe, Sidney, Miles, Violet, Edith and Reuben)

The spectators watched the Owen create their dynamic brood of nine, who had to do all the farm work

The spectators watched the Owen create their dynamic brood of nine, who had to do all the farm work

The show's fans were impressed with how well the Owen children grew and how much they praised the wonderful family

The show's fans were impressed with how well the Owen children grew and how much they praised the wonderful family

When the show started, eldest daughter Raven was in high school where she was hoping to go to college to become a veterinarian after her passion for animals blossomed on the farm.

Now Raven, who Amanda said did "a great job helping the little ones," had officially left the nest to go to college and make her dream come true.

She shared her excitement and concern over the idea of ​​living alone after years of growing up in a crowded house where you always meet someone.

Meanwhile, viewers watched teenage Reuben, who was around 11 when the show started, grow into a handy 16-year-old who had developed a flair for mechanics that he shares with his younger brother Sidney.

The Owens began sharing their lives with viewers in July 2015 when the show first aired. The children grew in the lens of the camera

The Owens began sharing their lives with viewers in July 2015 when the show first aired. The children grew in the lens of the camera

Amanda explained that Miles, one of the more reluctant Owen children, has nurtured a love of chickens and chickens by looking after them from an early age.

Edith and Violet, the middle daughters of the Owen clan, are known for their wickedness and solid friendship.

Fans were also reminded how Sid, who Amanda said always looked up to his older brother Reuben, made it his business to follow the teen into the workshop where he learned all about mechanics.

Annas, who was a toddler at the beginning of her show, grew up to be a “brave” seven-year-old, according to her mother.

The show also looked back on the Owen's youngest daughters, who were born after the show aired.

Viewers were given a flashback of how Amanda gave birth to Clemmie alone on the farm after she was stuck unaided.

Clemmie, now four, has grown into a playful toddler who is not afraid to help her parents on the farm.

During the final series, Clemmie, who preferred to stay on the farm than go to preschool, was shown helping her mother tend her sheep and face the reality of animal husbandry.

In an impressive excerpt from an earlier series, the four-year-old was shown calm and curious when her father was peeling off a lamp in front of him.

"You can't protect her from reality," Amanda said.

Meanwhile, the program showed three-year-old Nancy following in her sibling's footsteps.

Shepherdess Amanda explained that she hoped the chores her children had to do on the farm would teach them that they all have to pinch so their large family (pictured) can work

Shepherdess Amanda explained that she hoped the chores her children had to do on the farm would teach them that they all have to pinch so their large family (pictured) can work

The show also looked back at how Amanda and Clive faced trouble and prevailed to raise their formidable brood in the Yorkshire area.

The show showed how the children take responsibility on the farm, help their parents with their sheep, chickens or in the garden, never complain and enjoy what the beautiful plains of Yorkshire have to offer.

It was Reuben who explained to viewers in 2015 how he and his siblings were helping run the farm.

& # 39; I don't mind. Everyone has a job, Miles has chickens, I have calves, there are lambs and things to feed, so you're always busy, "said the then 11-year-old.

“I hope the jobs they have to do realize that it's an important part of the family. And to get a big family to work, they all have to stick to the line, ”explained Amanda.

The mother of nine admitted that raising her large brood was a "logistical nightmare".

“You have one, then it's two, it's just double the trouble. Then you have three, it's just a little more pressure. Four, it's a little extra, five, it doesn't matter anymore, ”she said.

The audience praised the Owen parents for bringing up a “wonderful family” and also expressed their admiration for their children.

"What wonderful parents you are, Amanda & Clive, your children are fabulous and a credit to both of you," said one.

Viewers praised the couple and the "great job" they did to raise their nine children while watching the program

Viewers praised the couple and the "great job" they did to raise their nine children while watching the program

& # 39; Just seen on channel 5 + 1 & # 39; Our Yorkshire Farm (5 yrs …) & # 39; what a wonderful family and what parenting should be like in raising an English family. Lovable family. Nice program. A must, ”said another.

“During this program (and everyone else on the show) my husband and I sit here with a silly grin on our faces! It is a beautiful testimony of the way you lead your life. Your children will grow up to be amazing individuals thanks to both of you. Lots of love, ”wrote one.

"Beautiful, well-behaved children," said one.

"Just excellent television – what a wonderful family," commented another.

"I've just seen the past 5 years at Our Yorkshire Farm what a great life you and Clive have made for you and your brood of nine," applauded one.

“How great are the children! What a great job you Amanda and Clive did, ”said another.

Amanda from Huddersfield traded rat racing for sheep strolling. Amanda appeared on Ben Fogle's New Lives In The Wild program in 2015, stating that she'll then feed ten mouths on just £ 130 a week.

Amanda grew up with her parents and a sibling in a traditional three-bed house in the large market town of Huddersfield.

At 6ft 2in, she was encouraged to pursue the same career path as her model mom, but she hated the clothes and makeup that she had to wear.

Then one day she came across a book about shepherds.

"It was the pictures, the landscape, the gaunt faces of the men who gathered in the fells, and the dogs … I thought," This is my dream, "she said on the Channel 5 show.

"In fact, I couldn't believe such a life really existed," she added.

Amanda left her comfortable city life to work on farms across the country, but when she knocked on the door of Ravenseat Farm, she found her calling.

"I was meant to come here – I'm absolutely sure of that," she said.

Clive, then 42, lived on 2,000 acres, and despite the age difference of 21 years, the couple quickly fell in love and tied the knot in 2000.

Amanda said she didn't want to protect her children from reality as the little ones faced animals that were dying on the farm

Amanda said she didn't want to protect her children from reality as the little ones faced animals that were dying on the farm

They had nine children, many of whom help out on the farm when they are out of school. Their traditional way of life also helps keep costs down.

With the closest store in the distance – and the risk of being snowed in for weeks during the winter – Amanda buys groceries in bulk and manages to feed her large family for just £ 130 a week.

Their water is free, is channeled from the creek in the moor and they heat the house and the water with a blazing fire that burns every day in all weathers.

The biggest electric bill is electricity, which costs £ 160 per month.

They pay their annual rent in the stone farmhouse with the profits from the farming – although this can be a struggle when 2,000 kilos of sheep's wool costs just £ 65.

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