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Victoria will have 532 new cases of coronavirus


Victoria has suffered a record 532 new cases of coronavirus when Prime Minister Daniel Andrews threatens to shut down entire industries in the next stage of restrictions.

Six other Victorians died overnight, including five elderly residents and a man in his fifties. A total of 245 people are in the hospital, 44 in the intensive care unit.

Prime Minister Andrews warned that Melbourne's six-week ban, which started on July 9, may need to be extended because the virus cannot be spread.

He urged people not to go to work when they were sick after outbreaks were discovered in butchers' shops, old people's homes, law firms, and other jobs.

“We have too many people who have symptoms and go to work. That's what drives these numbers up, ”said Andrews.

"The ban only ends when people stop working with symptoms and are tested instead because they have symptoms."

The prime minister said the next level of restrictions could include the closure of industries where outbreaks occur, such as the freight, logistics, and warehouse sectors.

"The next steps may have to include the closure of a number of these industries if we continue to see people participating in the work," he said.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Nick Coatsworth said the virus was "deeply embedded" in Melbourne. Pictured: ADF troops and police in Melbourne on Sunday

ADF staff and Victorian police officers patrol the Melbourne Botanical Gardens on Sunday

ADF staff and Victorian police officers patrol the Melbourne Botanical Gardens on Sunday

In the Melbourne Botanical Gardens, residents wear masks

In the Melbourne Botanical Gardens, residents wear masks

Medical personnel dispose of clinical waste at St. Basil’s Home for the elderly in Fawkner, where COVID-19 has broken out

Medical personnel dispose of clinical waste at St. Basil’s Home for the elderly in Fawkner, where COVID-19 has broken out

The total number of cases is above 459 on Sunday as a second wave of fatal disease continues to devastate the state.

Nick Coatsworth, deputy medical director, said the block should have reduced the number of cases by now, but the coronavirus is "deeply embedded" in Australia's second largest city.

"The virus is deeply rooted in the Victoria community," he told Nines Today's program.

But Dr. Coatsworth said there are some signs of hope as the lock manages to prevent movement.

“We know that the Victorians mix much less in these restricted areas. The motion data shows us that we are roughly where we were in this first wave when the curve flattened.

"The other problem is that although these numbers are deeply worrying, they fluctuate between 350 and 450 a day and we certainly don't see any doubling over the week, which is a good thing."

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said today that Victoria had "a long way to go" before reducing the huge daily sums.

There is still a long way to go in Victoria. We're still seeing case numbers at an elevated level, and as we've seen from other countries, it takes some time for a community-based broadcast to take place.

“We saw that in the UK. We saw it in Europe. We saw it in other places, ”he said.

A resident wears a mask in Melbourne as the outbreak of the state worsens

A resident wears a mask in Melbourne as the outbreak of the state worsens

There are fears that Melbourne's six-week ban, which started on July 9, will have to be extended because the virus cannot be spread. Pictured: Medical personnel dispose of clinical waste in St. Basil's house

There are fears that Melbourne's six-week ban, which started on July 9, will have to be extended because the virus cannot be spread. Pictured: Medical personnel dispose of clinical waste in St. Basil's house

A cyclist wears a mask on the Yarra River in Melbourne on Sunday

A cyclist wears a mask on the Yarra River in Melbourne on Sunday

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said today that Victoria had "a long way to go" before reducing the huge daily sums

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) said today that Victoria had "a long way to go" before reducing the huge daily sums

Mr. Morrison said Prime Minister Daniel Andrews would seek advice from health experts on whether the ban should be extended.

Hundreds of Victorian elderly residents and staff are fighting COVID-19 while families are having difficulty checking for their relatives. The number of fatalities is likely to increase in the country's most affected state.

Mr. Morrison urged the Victorians to follow the state's blocking rules to stop community transmission.

"If you have problems in elderly care, it is a function of community transfer," he said.

"If you want to protect the weakest in our community, this is so important."

Victoria's chief health officer Brett Sutton said the second wave was "difficult and complex" to manage.

"These are certainly very challenging numbers. We are at a very challenging stage with this wave," he said.

Professor Sutton said this wave is different from the first because most patients are younger, which means they go to work.

"Our transmission areas take place at workplaces, mainly at important workplaces," he said.

He warned of further deaths in nursing homes that have suffered outbreaks.

There are now 84 cases related to the Fawkner Basil Retirement Home; 77 in Epping Gardens geriatric care; 62 in Menarocklife geriatric care in Essendon; 53 in Glendale geriatric care in Werribee; 57 in Kirkbrae Presbyterian Houses in Kilsyth; and 50 in Estia Altenpflege in Heidelberg.

New South Wales saw 17 new cases on Monday.

Four of the new cases are related to the funeral assembly cluster, three are household contacts of cases related to Thai Rock Wetherill Park, and two are under investigation. Eight are returning travelers in hotel quarantine.

Victoria had the highest pandemic death rate in Australia on Sunday, with 10 deaths and 459 new cases.

Seven of the deaths on Sunday were associated with outbreaks in elderly care facilities, while the youngest was a man aged 40.

St. Basil's was taken over by the federal government to control the deadly situation, including a family call center to get information about their relatives.

The federal government held an online information session with families of residents of St. Basil on Sunday evening after gathering at the facility earlier in the day.

Nicholas Barboussas was told at the weekend by St. Basil’s that his father was at home and that he was fine after being told by the Northern Hospital that his father was fighting for his life.

ADF officials and Victorian police patrol Melbourne's Fitzroy Gardens on Saturday as the number of cases continues to increase

ADF officials and Victorian police patrol Melbourne's Fitzroy Gardens on Saturday as the number of cases continues to increase

This graphic shows how the second wave of the state was not kept under control even when it was blocked

Mr. Barboussas told Nines Today's program that the family had managed to play with sick grandfather FaceTime before he passed away on Sunday after Victoria's official case and toll numbers were released.

"We saw a smile on Dad's face when he saw us and especially his grandchildren. And it was comforting for us to see him, though in a rather bad way, ”he said.

Other families said they did not know whether their relatives were hospitalized with COVID-19 or what their condition was.

"We understand the emotional impact of the situation on residents, employees and families," said Minister of Elderly Richard Colbeck in a statement.

The federal government has set up a call center so that families can receive information about their relatives.

Prime Minister Andrews said on Sunday that Victorians who refused to wear face masks were "selfish" in the nation's deadly coronavirus crisis.

Most Victorians did the right thing after having people in Melbourne and Mitchell Shire last week wearing facewear outside, Andrews said.

Melbourne is already in the fourth phase of being blocked with mandatory masks. Pictured is a young woman who follows the strict new rules as she drives through St. Kilda on Saturday

Melbourne is already in the fourth phase of being blocked with mandatory masks. Pictured is a young woman who follows the strict new rules as she drives through St. Kilda on Saturday

The residents line up in front of the Royal Melbourne Hosital for coronavirus tests in Melbourne

The residents line up in front of the Royal Melbourne Hosital for coronavirus tests in Melbourne

Other Victorians are expected to wear masks when the 1.5m social distance is not possible.

"If you only make a selfish decision that affects your supposed personal freedom by quoting something you've read on a website, it's not about human rights," said Andrews.

“There are 10 families who will bury someone in the next few days. Wear a mask. & # 39;

Videos posted on social media of a woman who challenged Bunnings employees and asked them to wear a mask to enter a store and call a postal worker have also sparked outrage in the community.

Shops like Bunnings are privately owned and have the right to make customer requests, including wearing masks.

The woman in question informed the Bunnings employee that she was being discriminated against and that the request violated the law and her human rights.

The Australian economy continues to be hit by COVID-19, particularly Melbourne. Pictured: Greville Street in the inner-city suburb of Prahran

The Australian economy continues to be hit by COVID-19, particularly Melbourne. Pictured: Greville Street in the inner-city suburb of Prahran

Dr. Coatsworth said it was "disturbing" to see people attacking others doing their jobs.

"It's not a human rights issue not to wear a mask," he told the Today Show on Monday.

“I just can't see how it takes human rights or individual freedom to only put on a face mask at the government's request. It's easy. We know it is effective. We know it's time to do it. & # 39;

Dr. Coatsworth praised the Victorians' general efforts to stay at home or wear masks when in public.

& # 39; It sounds so easy. We recognize that it is difficult. The faster we do that together, the faster the curve will bend on the other side, ”he said.

Police said on Sunday that 126 fines had been imposed in the past 24 hours.

Twenty US $ 200 fines were imposed on non-masked people, including a man and a woman who refused to provide police information when they were stopped.

The state reported a record 10 new deaths for COVID-19, increasing the state's toll to 61 and the country's toll to 155.

Daniel Andrews brings in the army

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews announced on Friday that ADF soldiers will knock on the door of residents who test positive to verify that they are isolated.

"If for some reason you don't answer the phone, the ADF staff knocks on your door," he said.

If a person cannot be contacted after two calls within a two-hour window, or refuses to attend a contact tracking interview, the troops visit the address on the same day.

If there is no good reason for the absence, the person may be fined $ 1,652 for violating public health laws.

65 properties have been visited under this program since Wednesday, and as of Friday the government will have 23 teams on site.

Mr Andrews' critics said it was scandalous that this type of enforcement had not yet occurred.

The liberal frontbencher Tim Smith tweeted: "So the state government has not persecuted infected people who could not be reached by phone … until NOW? !!! You should contact them within 24 hours, what an absolute scandal. It is simply negligent. No wonder this virus got out of control. & # 39;

Pictured: Police and army enforce mandatory face masks as they stroll through the Royal Botanical Gardens in Melbourne on Thursday

Pictured: Police and army enforce mandatory face masks as they stroll through the Royal Botanical Gardens in Melbourne on Thursday

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