ENTERTAINMENT

Victoria will announce more than 600 new coronavirus cases after the worst day


Victoria has had the second worst day since the coronavirus pandemic began when a young doctor is fighting for his life after the fatal illness.

The state recorded 627 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Friday, just a day after a record number of cases were announced.

Victoria had 723 cases on Thursday – the darkest day in Australia since the fight against the virus began.

Every fourth Victorian who was supposed to isolate himself was not at home when he was knocked on the door by the ADF on Thursday.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews criticized residents for not properly isolating when he warned that Melbourne's debilitating lock could be extended if the number of cases continues to increase.

The Prime Minister was in crisis talks with Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday evening and discussed the possibility of further restrictions to slow the spread of the disease.

Mr. Andrews said an announcement would be made early next week about the possibility of further restrictions.

Mr. Andrews said an announcement would be made early next week about the possibility of further restrictions (Image: woman wearing a mandatory face mask in Melbourne on Thursday)

Medical workers evacuate a resident from the Epping Gardens geriatric care facility in the Epping suburb of Melbourne (pictured on Thursday).

Medical workers evacuate a resident from the Epping Gardens geriatric care facility in the Epping suburb of Melbourne (pictured on Thursday).

Two men wear face shields as they walk a dog in Melbourne

Two men wear face shields as they walk a dog in Melbourne

Healthcare teams review the data to determine where transfers are taking place and whether further action is required.

Victoria's latest COVID 19 statistics:

Victoria recorded 627 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Friday.

Two men in the fifties, two men in the seventies, three men in the eighties and one woman in the seventies were among those who died.

There are currently 349 Victorians in the hospital and 37 in the intensive care unit.

A 30-year-old emergency doctor is one of the intensive care patients after the illness.

Every fourth resident who was supposed to isolate himself was not at home when he was knocked on the door by the ADF on Thursday.

Mr. Andrews said it was a critical half in the six-week suspension for Greater Melbourne and the Mitchell Shires.

He said the analysis would "provide real-time clarity on what is happening to this virus and what we may need to do to further reduce those numbers."

"We know that these numbers are still too high," he said.

“There can be no recovery in the economy until we address this public health challenge.

"Exactly what it will be, when it will be, how long it would take to operate, all of that would be for another day."

A New Zealand-style block, in which all companies expect essential services to be closed, is believed to have been an option discussed with the Prime Minister.

A less extreme option would see other restrictions that restrict people traveling outside of their immediate neighborhood to get supplies.

Two men in the fifties, two men in the seventies, three men in the eighties and one woman in the seventies were among those who died.

There are currently 349 Victorians in the hospital and 37 in the intensive care unit.

A 30-year-old emergency doctor is one of the intensive care patients after the illness.

Mr. Andrews said it was "disturbing" to hear that the residents continued doing business despite a positive test.

More than 130 people who returned a positive test didn't properly isolate on Thursday.

Victoria broke the record for a one-time daily increase in coronavirus cases on Thursday (pictured here is medical staff at the Fawkner nursing home).

Victoria broke the record for a one-time daily increase in coronavirus cases on Thursday (pictured here is medical staff at the Fawkner nursing home).

Medical staff and a health commander are seen in a nursing home where coronavirus disease breaks out (image: nursing home in Epping Gardens).

Medical staff and a health commander are seen in a nursing home where coronavirus disease breaks out (image: nursing home in Epping Gardens).

Victoria's fatal outbreak grew 723 cases, killing 13 people on Thursday - the darkest day in Australia since the fight against the virus began

Victoria's fatal outbreak grew 723 cases, killing 13 people on Thursday – the darkest day in Australia since the fight against the virus began

"It is simply unacceptable that you have this virus and are not at home if you do other things," he said.

"A handful will breathe fresh air – that doesn't explain those numbers that really go beyond that."

The Victorian authorities are now able to ensure that the state is ready for a rush of coronavirus patients in the hospital, a senior government source said.

"A senior government official in Australia suggested that Victoria is too far away – that there are no structures to suppress the virus through contact tracking," said Sky News political editor Andrew Clenell on Thursday.

"Now it just has to make sure that there are enough fans, beds and personal protective equipment."

The deadly outbreak of the state grew by 723 cases and killed 13 people on Thursday - the darkest day in Australia since the fight against the virus began (picture: employees can be seen at a pop-up location in Colac Area Health).

The deadly outbreak of the state grew by 723 cases and killed 13 people on Thursday – the darkest day in Australia since the fight against the virus began (picture: employees can be seen at a pop-up location in Colac Area Health).

All Victorians must wear a face mask on Sundays from 11:59 p.m. Pictured: People wear face masks in Melbourne

All Victorians must wear a face mask on Sundays from 11:59 p.m. Pictured: People wear face masks in Melbourne

Mr. Andrews said the biggest driver of community transmission was people who continued to go to work uncomfortably.

He warned earlier this week that "the next steps could include the closure of a number of these industries."

Brett Sutton, Victoria's chief health officer, previously said that a New Zealand-style block would not necessarily solve Victoria's problems.

"We need to understand what the dynamics of transmission in Victoria are like at this point," said Prof. Sutton.

“It may well be that there is a terrible impact on the economy and people's lives without material benefits if we go for a New Zealand-style block.

Medical workers evacuate a resident from the elderly care facility in Epping Gardens on Thursday

Medical workers evacuate a resident from the elderly care facility in Epping Gardens on Thursday

A young doctor fights for his life after being infected with COVID-19 when Victoria is affected by another day with cases of high coronavirus (Image: People with PSA in the Epping Gardens old people's home)

A young doctor fights for his life after being infected with COVID-19 when Victoria is affected by another day with cases of high coronavirus (Image: People with PSA in the Epping Gardens old people's home)

& # 39; We need to understand where the transfer takes place and what measures are most effective to reduce it. We have to be careful about where the problems are and address them directly. & # 39;

While daily NSW infections have exceeded 20 in the past 14 days, a former government official has warned that a single "Super Spreader" event could trigger a Victorian-style outbreak.

"NSW is not in a good place," Stephen Duckett, health economist at the Grattan Institute and former Secretary of the Department of Health, told nine.com.au.

"Every day that passes you have a risk. While the virus is circulating, there is always a chance that a super spreader event will occur and you will then get into a fight. & # 39;

ADF employees can be seen at Epping Gardens Aged Care on Thursday. Victoria has confirmed a record of 723 new COVID-19 cases and 13 deaths

ADF employees can be seen at Epping Gardens Aged Care on Thursday. Victoria has confirmed a record of 723 new COVID-19 cases and 13 deaths

Australia's coronavirus cases have increased dramatically after the first fall wave was virtually defeated

Australia's coronavirus cases have increased dramatically after the first fall wave was virtually defeated

John Kaldor, professor of epidemiology at the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales, said the cases that posed the greatest risk were those that were not associated with known cases or outbreaks.

The percentage of cases in NSW that are not related to known cases is only about 10 percent, but Professor Kaldor said the virus can "move in a way that you do not predict".

The warnings come when allegations of neglect surfaced from the coronavirus-ridden Epping Gardens Aged Care home in northern Melbourne.

Doctors claimed that patients remained dead in their beds for six hours, the Australian reported.

On Monday, the staff-to-patient ratio at the facility – who has not yet responded to the allegations – was reportedly one to 14 when the normal ratio in public hospitals is one to four or five.

Daily Mail Australia asked the nursing home for a comment.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Thursday he supported the introduction of new measures to slow the spread of the virus in Melbourne and said that the number of cases in the "Victorian wave" was very worrying.

& # 39; We have been in this lock for a few weeks now and are not getting the results we would hope for. As a result, the further action that will be taken is certainly necessary, ”said Morrison.

Mr. Andrews on Thursday prohibited residents of the Colac-Otway, Greater Geelong, Surf Coast, Moorabool, Golden Plains and Queenscliff boroughs from welcoming visitors home from Friday.

A number of people are waiting to be tested for COVID-19 at a popup center in Sydney on Thursday

A number of people are waiting to be tested for COVID-19 at a popup center in Sydney on Thursday

A medical worker performs a test for COVID-19 at a popup test center in Sydney on Thursday. Experts have warned that New South Wales could be on the verge of a second wave of coronavirus as severe as that in Victoria

A medical worker performs a test for COVID-19 at a popup test center in Sydney on Thursday. Experts have warned that New South Wales could be on the verge of a second wave of coronavirus as severe as that in Victoria

From 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, he extended the mandatory mask to the rest of Victoria.

"It is impractical, challenging, but for Melbourne it is essentially the fourth stage, and we can do it in the Victoria region without incurring significant economic costs but with a really significant public health benefit," said Andrews on Thursday to reporters.

He also warned that Melbourne's debilitating lock will likely be extended if the number of cases continues to increase.

"Ultimately, every Victorian knows and appreciates that this suspension won't end quickly unless everyone plays their part," said Andrews.

VICTORIA'S JULY CORONAVIRUS nightmare

Friday July 31 – 627 cases, eight deaths

Thursday July 30th – 723 cases, 13 deaths – record day numbers for Australia

Wednesday July 29th – 295 cases, nine deaths. Victoria has more deaths than the rest of the country combined

Tuesday July 28th – 384 cases, six deaths

Monday July 27th – 532 cases, six deaths

Sunday July 26th – 459 cases, 10 deaths nationwide

Saturday July 25th – 357 cases, five deaths

Friday July 24th – 300 cases, seven deaths, contract tracking expanded

Thursday July 23 – 403 cases, five deaths, the worst day for deaths in a state, masks now mandatory

Wednesday July 22nd – 484 cases, two deaths

Tuesday July 21 – 374 cases, three deaths

Monday July 20th – 275 cases, one death

Sunday July 19th – 363 cases, three deaths, determine that masks in restricted areas become mandatory

Saturday July 18th – 217 cases, three deaths, permanent public residential tower in Melbourne that was released from the severe blockade

Friday July 17th – 428 cases, three deaths

Thursday July 16 – 317 cases, two deaths

Wednesday July 15th – 238 cases, one death

Tuesday July 14th – 270 cases, two deaths

Monday July 13th – 177 cases

Sunday July 12th – 273 cases, one death

Saturday July 11th – 216 cases, one death

Friday July 10th – 288 cases, a national daily record at that time

Thursday July 9th – 165 cases, eight out of nine Melbourne public apartment towers released from the severe blockade

Wednesday July 8th – 134 cases, new third stage restrictions announced for Melbourne and Mitchell Shire

Tuesday July 7th – 191 cases

Monday, July 6th – 127 cases, two deaths, NSW border closed

Sunday July 5th – 74 cases

Saturday July 4th – 108 cases, immediate hard blockade of nine Melbourne public apartment towers

Friday July 3rd – 66 cases

Thursday July 2nd – 77 cases

Wednesday July 1st – 73 cases

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