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Victims of the Christchurch Mosque attack suffer heartbreak at gunman's hearing in New Zealand


Applause broke out in a courtroom when the victims of the attack on the Christchurch mosque defended themselves against the "loser" during his hearing.

Brenton Tarrant, the Australian who killed 51 Muslim worshipers in New Zealand's worst mass shootings last March, is sentenced this week after confessing to the murders.

A procession of its victims has brought heartbreaking testimony to the High Court describing the loss of their loved ones in statements about the effects of emotional sacrifice.

Several victims said they still have trouble falling asleep more than a year after the attack.

Many have described persistent financial difficulties, problems socializing, and, of course, the heartache of losing husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters, and friends.

Brenton Tarrant, the Australian who killed 51 believers in New Zealand's worst mass shootings last year, listened Tuesday to testimony about the impact of the victims

Mirwais Waziri, originally from Afghanistan, was sitting in the corridor of the Al Noor mosque when Tarrant terrorized the mosque on March 15 last year.

He was shot in the neck but survived the attack.

Waziri was due to read an impact statement on Tuesday, but set it aside to address Tarrant directly after finding that he had no "regrets, no shame".

"I decided not to read my statement and show him how much I suffer," he said, Stuff reported.

Instead, Waziri used his time in court to thank Tarrant for showing the world what a terrorist really is.

“We as Muslims are not terrorists. Terrorists have no religion, race or color. You are the loser and we are the winners. You have shown the world that you are the terrorist, ”he said.

Mirwais Waziri, originally from Afghanistan, said: “You are the loser and we are the winners. You proved to the world that you are the terrorist.

Hazem Mohammed, a survivor of the Al Noor Mosque massacre, told the court that Tarrant "must remain in prison forever" and said the shooter had "shown no remorse".

Hazem Mohammed, a survivor of the Al Noor Mosque massacre, told the court that Tarrant "must remain in prison forever" and said the shooter had "shown no remorse".

Brenton Tarrant arrives at Christchurch High Court during his trial Tuesday

Brenton Tarrant arrives at Christchurch High Court during his trial Tuesday

Waziri's powerful comments received applause from the public gallery.

Kyron Gosse, the nephew of 65-year-old victim Linda Armstrong, said Tarrant came to New Zealand as a guest but used that privilege to destroy a family that had lived there for seven generations.

"That coward hid behind his big, powerful weapons with his own racist agenda and shot little old Linda from a distance," he said.

Gosse said the Sagittarius "stole our nation's innocence".

The five million people were relatively free of major gun violence until the worst mass shootings in the country last year.

Nathan Smith, originally from Great Britain and a survivor of the Al Noor mosque shooting, also spoke directly to Tarrant and suggested that the shooter "try to read the Koran".

Nathan Smith, originally from Great Britain and a survivor of the Al Noor mosque shooting, also spoke directly to Tarrant and suggested that the shooter "try to read the Koran".

Kyron Gosse, nephew of victim Linda Armstrong, is seen during the Tarrant hearing on Tuesday

Kyron Gosse, nephew of victim Linda Armstrong, is seen during the Tarrant hearing on Tuesday

Sanjeda Neha's husband, Mohammad Omar Faruk, 36, was shot in the back and killed while praying in the Al Noor Mosque last year.

The couple's daughter, Noor Omar, becomes one on Friday, but she never got the chance to meet her father.

In a victim impact statement, the court was told that Neha cries when she thinks about the loss of her husband, the NZ Herald reported.

"There are two things I feel when I look at our baby emotionally. I want to cry. I ask why Allah took him away. What sin did I commit that we were punished for," she said.

"Sometimes I would rather die …"

Sanjeda Neha's husband, Mohammad Omar Faruk, 36, was shot in the back and killed while praying in the Al Noor Mosque on March 15 last year

Sanjeda Neha's husband, Mohammad Omar Faruk, 36, was shot in the back and killed while praying in the Al Noor Mosque on March 15 last year

The couple's daughter, Noor Omar, turns one on Friday, but she never got the chance to meet her father (pictured)

The couple's daughter, Noor Omar, turns one on Friday, but she never got the chance to meet her father (pictured)

Neha's daughter takes its name from her late father and the mosque where he prayed in his final moments.

"When I'm alone, I sometimes have something to do with Farouk … I cry when I'm alone … but I have to be strong for my daughter," said Neha.

Neha, who married Faruk in Bangladesh on December 29, 2017, told the court that her daughter reminded her of her husband when she breathes and cries.

The mother said she often wondered how she would tell her daughter about her father's death when she was older.

Faruk had been working in Christchurch since 2015 and had planned to bring the then pregnant Neha to New Zealand.

At the time of the attack, Neha was in Bangladesh. She traveled to New Zealand after her husband died.

Their daughter was born in New Zealand – where Neha wants to stay – but she is under pressure to support Faruk's family in Bangladesh.

Zahid Ismail lost his twin brother in the attack last year. Pictured: Zahid Ismail and Raesha Ismail are seen in court on Tuesday

Zahid Ismail lost his twin brother in the attack last year. Pictured: Zahid Ismail and Raesha Ismail are seen in court on Tuesday

Very few victims caused emotion in Tarrant. You sit in the dock about five meters away and listen to statements about the victim's impact.

That was until Zahid Ismail took his seat in the courtroom, standing stoically and eying Tarrant while his taped video was played on large screens set up in court.

Mr Ismail lost his twin brother Junaid, who died of a gunshot wound to the chest in the Al Noor Mosque.

"While my pregnant wife and I were parking, a shootout became a reality," he said.

"Now my brother cannot see how his children grow and how they develop into adults."

Ms. Ismail then described Junaid's "passion for cricket and pride in his long beard".

Tarrant averted his gaze from the screen and looked at Mr. Ismail, who giggled approvingly.

Mr. Ismail, whose nose was dilated and his cheeks pulsing in and out, heightened the intensity of his gaze.

"I wanted to see if there was empathy," he told AAP in court.

"There's definitely a human in there."

For much of the sentencing, Tarrant sat largely still.

Sometimes the 29-year-old puts his hand on his desk and repeatedly taps a finger while the rest of his body remains motionless with crossed legs.

A woman speaks to police officers when she arrives at Christchurch High Court on Tuesday

A woman speaks to police officers when she arrives at Christchurch High Court on Tuesday

Police snipers can be seen on the roof of Christchurch High Court on Tuesday morning

Police snipers can be seen on the roof of Christchurch High Court on Tuesday morning

The terrorist is not inattentive.

He kept his eyes on the speakers while they were speaking or on the large screens when playing back previously recorded statements.

He occasionally nodded to the victims as they finished their testimony.

Mr. Ismail was succeeded by his sister Raesha Ismail, who described how her non-Muslim community adopted their Islamic beliefs after the attack.

“After the March 15th events, I don't think I need to hide my trust in the workplace. That was positive, ”she said.

“I set up a Muslim calendar at work … I was asked to hold an Eid party, which was well attended.

"I have strengthened my voice so that I can stand up for it when it matters."

Both Mr. and Mrs. Ismail showed the defiance that has characterized so many victims by the court this week.

"Since my brother's death … I had visions of what his future would have been like with his wife and children," said Ms. Ismail.

"Our family will raise you to be proud New Zealand children … it is a source of healing to be able to help when I can."

Mr Ismail told AAP that his testimony was "a healing moment".

“Now my brother cannot see how his children grow and how they develop into adults. But they are becoming confident of becoming proud kiwis who live in the same place as their father, ”he said.

“My family and I have always been strong individuals. I keep visiting (Al Noor Mosque) and praying with passion and strength. & # 39;

Noraini Abbas Milne, right, mother of 14-year-old mosque shooting victim Sayyad, made her statement on the victim's impact during Tuesday's hearing

Noraini Abbas Milne, right, mother of 14-year-old mosque shooting victim Sayyad, made her statement on the victim's impact during Tuesday's hearing

The survivor of the Motasim Hafiz Uddin mosque shooting (right) read his statement on Tuesday about the impact of the victim

The survivor of the Motasim Hafiz Uddin mosque shooting (right) read his statement on Tuesday about the impact of the victim

Motasim Uddin, who was shot in the leg and spent more than three months in the hospital, said he could not return to his job as a welder and was worried about his future, particularly as he tried to support his parents in Bangladesh.

"I can't forget what happened, what I saw," said Uddin.

"I'm trying to forget, but I wake up and think about it."

Noraini Milne, whose 14-year-old son Sayyad was killed, said her own survival was a blessing as she planned to spend her life helping others.

"You have chosen a despicable and cowardly act," she said to Tarrant.

Tarrant arrives in court to hear statements about the victim's impact at his hearing on Tuesday

Tarrant arrives in court to hear statements about the victim's impact at his hearing on Tuesday

Mr Ismail (pictured in court on Tuesday) told AAP his testimony was "a healing moment".

Mr Ismail (pictured in court on Tuesday) told AAP his testimony was "a healing moment".

Tarrant pleaded guilty to murder, 40 of attempted murder and one of terrorism after storming two mosques in Christchurch. The rampage ended when the police stopped him while he was traveling to a third.

Lawyers expect the 29-year-old Australian to be the first person to be jailed for life without parole in New Zealand.

Shortly before the shooting, Tarrant posted a 74-page manifesto online containing racist conspiracy theories.

Tarrant represents himself at the hearing, but Judge Cameron Mander has imposed reporting restrictions to prevent him from using the court as a platform for extremist views.

Victims of the Christchurch attack included (top row, from left) Naeem Rashid, Lilik Abdul Hamid, Ansi Alibava, Maheboob Khokar, Syed Jahandad Ali and Zulfirman Syah (who was not killed but took a bullet to save his son ), Osama Adnan Amjad Hamid; (second row from left) Haroon Mahmood, Mohammad Atta Elayyan, Khaled Mustafa, Sayyad Milne, Haji Daoud Nabi, Farhaj Ahsan, Linda Armstrong, Mojammel Hoq; (third row from left) Abdulfatteh Qasem, Mucad Ibrahim, Mohammed Omar Faruk, Husne Ara Parvin, Ozair Kadir, Talha Naeem, Tariq Omar, Ramiz Vora; (bottom row from left) Kamel Darwish, Arifbhai Vora, Sohail Shadid, Abdus Samad, Hussein al-Umari, Ahmed Jahangir (who was injured), Ali Elmadani, Musa Vali Suleman Patel. Not shown in this assembly are Hamza Mustafa, Mohamed Moosid Mohamedhosen, Areeb Ahmed, Ashraf Ali, Muse Nur Awale, Zakariya Bhuiya, Karam Bibi, Ghulam Hussain, Muhammad Zeeshan Raza, Abdukadir Elmi, Ahmed Gamal Eldin Abdel-Ghany, Mohsen Mohammed Al Harbi Junaid Ismail, Mohammad Imran Khan, Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi, Hussein Moustafa, Matiullah Safi, Mounir Guirgis Soliman, Ashraf El-Moursy Ragheb, Zekeriya Tuyan and Ashraf Alie

Victims of the Christchurch attack included (top row, from left) Naeem Rashid, Lilik Abdul Hamid, Ansi Alibava, Maheboob Khokar, Syed Jahandad Ali and Zulfirman Syah (who was not killed but took a bullet to save his son ), Osama Adnan Amjad Hamid; (second row from left) Haroon Mahmood, Mohammad Atta Elayyan, Khaled Mustafa, Sayyad Milne, Haji Daoud Nabi, Farhaj Ahsan, Linda Armstrong, Mojammel Hoq; (third row from left) Abdulfatteh Qasem, Mucad Ibrahim, Mohammed Omar Faruk, Husne Ara Parvin, Ozair Kadir, Talha Naeem, Tariq Omar, Ramiz Vora; (bottom row from left) Kamel Darwish, Arifbhai Vora, Sohail Shadid, Abdus Samad, Hussein al-Umari, Ahmed Jahangir (who was injured), Ali Elmadani, Musa Vali Suleman Patel. Not shown in this assembly are Hamza Mustafa, Mohamed Moosid Mohamedhosen, Areeb Ahmed, Ashraf Ali, Muse Nur Awale, Zakariya Bhuiya, Karam Bibi, Ghulam Hussain, Muhammad Zeeshan Raza, Abdukadir Elmi, Ahmed Gamal Eldin Abdel-Ghany, Mohsen Mohammed Al Harbi Junaid Ismail, Mohammad Imran Khan, Muhammad Haziq Mohd-Tarmizi, Hussein Moustafa, Matiullah Safi, Mounir Guirgis Soliman, Ashraf El-Moursy Ragheb, Zekeriya Tuyan and Ashraf Alie

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