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Unrest in the US Capitol: Barack Obama condemns Trump for "inciting" violence


Barack Obama weighed the decline of thousands of Trump's supporters on the Capitol, claiming "We'd be kidding ourselves if we took it as a total surprise."

Barack Obama on Wednesday weighed the unprecedented violation of Capitol Hill by thousands of Donald Trump's supporters, claiming the chaos is not surprising given the rhetoric surrounding the election.

"History will rightly remember today's violence in the Capitol, instigated by a seated president who continued to lie unfounded about the outcome of a legitimate election as a moment of great shame and shame for our nation," wrote Obama in a statement on Wednesday.

He added, "But we'd be kidding ourselves if we took it as a total surprise."

The former president was largely silent in Washington DC on January 6, the same day that Congress certified the election of Joe Biden, who was Obama's vice president for eight years.

He finally weighed around 8:00 p.m. when the massive scene at the Capitol broke up and Congress resumed its joint session to accept the results of the electoral college six hours behind schedule.

"Here is my statement on today's violence in the Capitol," Obama wrote in a tweet with a picture of his statement attached.

"Your (Republican) fantasy story has moved further and further away from reality and is built on years of resentment," wrote Obama. "Now we see the consequences emerging in a violent crescendo."

After listening to President Trump on the Ellipse Wednesday afternoon, thousands of supporters marched from there to Capitol Hill, where they successfully breached the Capitol and deterred Congress from its duty to confirm the election.

The Capitol was immediately closed and the legislators escorted from their respective chambers.

Obama said he was optimistic that GOP members would turn against the president, claiming "We need more leaders like this one."

The former president wrote in his statement:

The former president wrote in his statement: "History will rightly remember today's violence in the Capitol, instigated by a seated president who continued to lie unfounded about the outcome of a legitimate election as a moment of great shame and shame for our nation. "

When Obama released his statement, all three other living presidents made their statements on the matter.

Former Democratic President Bill Clinton posted a statement on a four-part Twitter thread.

"Today we faced an unprecedented attack on our Capitol, our Constitution and our country," wrote the 42nd president. "The attack was fueled by more than four years of poisoning policies in which deliberate misinformation was disseminated, suspicion was instilled in our system and Americans were pitted against each other."

He continued, & # 39; The match was set on fire by Donald Trump and his most ardent enablers, including many in Congress, to reverse the results of an election he lost. The choice was free, the count was fair, the result is final. We must complete the peaceful transfer of power from our constitutional mandates. & # 39;

“I've always believed that America is made up of good, decent people. I still do, ”he said.

"If we are what we really are, we must reject today's violence, turn the page and move forward together – uphold our constitution and remain committed to a government of the people, the people and the people."

Former President Jimmy Carter released a statement late Wednesday night as Congress voted on whether to accept the results of the electoral college.

"This is a national tragedy," said Carter of the "violence in the US Capitol."

"After watching elections in difficult democracies around the world, I know that we, the people, can unite to step back from this abyss and obey our nation's laws peacefully, and we must," he added in the statement added.

Former President George W. Bush, in particular, slapped Trump's loyalists in Congress, claiming they had prompted the president's biggest supporters to storm the Capitol.

"It's a disgusting and heartbreaking sight," said the 43rd US President in his statement. "This is how the election results are disputed in a banana republic – not in our democratic republic."

Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney joined Bush's sentiment.

Romney, who has been an outspoken critic of the president for the past two years as a Senator in Utah, said the chaos on Capitol Hill was due to a selfish man's wounded pride and outrage from his supporters, whom he intentionally misinformed has encouraged us to act over the past two months. & # 39;

He also accused his Republican colleagues in the House and Senate of agreeing to object to the results of the electoral college, giving supporters false hope that there was a way to undo Joe Biden's victory.

"The objectors have claimed that they are doing this on behalf of the voters," Romney said in a statement released on Wednesday. "Have an audit done to satisfy the many people who believe the election was stolen." You're welcome! No Congressional-led audit will ever convince these voters, especially if the president continues to claim the election was stolen. & # 39;

Republican Senator from Utah, Mitt Romney

Former Republican President George W. Bush

Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney (left) and former Republican President George W. Bush (right) also condemned the siege of the Capitol on Wednesday, alleging the GOP lawmakers were responsible for instigating the action by planning to question the results of the electoral college

Bush released a statement describing the Capitol scene as "sick" and how the election results are "controversial in a banana republic".

Bush released a statement describing the Capitol scene as "sick" and how the election results are "controversial in a banana republic".

Romney condemned his Republican counterparts in Congress in a statement Wednesday, writing: “The objectors have claimed that they are doing this on behalf of the voters. Have an audit done to satisfy the many people who believe the election was stolen. You're welcome! No Congressional-led audit will ever convince these voters, especially if the president continues to claim the election was stolen. "

Romney condemned his Republican counterparts in Congress in a statement Wednesday, writing: “The objectors have claimed that they are doing this on behalf of the voters. Have an audit done to satisfy the many people who believe the election was stolen. You're welcome! No Congressional-led audit will ever convince these voters, especially if the president continues to claim the election was stolen. "

A group of House and Senate Republican lawmakers launched a plan to object to the election results and faced the president over his still baseless allegations of widespread electoral fraud and a result "manipulated" by the Democrats.

Bush said in his statement: "I am appalled at the ruthless behavior of some political leaders since the elections and the lack of respect for our institutions, our traditions and our law enforcement today."

"The violent attack on the Capitol – and the suspension of a constitutionally mandated Congress – was undertaken by people whose passions were inflamed by falsehoods and false hopes," Bush continued.

Romney urged his GOP lawmakers to "show respect for voters" who are angry about the election results and "tell them the truth" about the election result. "That is the burden and the duty of leadership," he said in his statement.

"The truth is that President-elect Biden won this election," Romney repeated. "President Trump has lost."

Bush also condemned the president and his thousands of supporters who besieged the Capitol in an unprecedented and massive demonstration on Wednesday after marching to Capitol Hill from a rally with the likely on the ellipse.

Supporters prevented a joint congressional session from confirming Biden's victory, the next step in getting the president-elect to the White House.

Bush called the scene a "riot".

As of Wednesday afternoon, thousands of demonstrators traveling to Washington DC to protest the election results marched from the ellipse near the White House to the Capitol to break the session.

Vice President Mike Pence was evacuated from the Senate Chamber shortly after 2 p.m. along with Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, the pro tempore President who succeeds the presidency.

Thousands of pro-Trump protesters came to Capitol Hill Wednesday to prevent Congress from confirming the election for Joe Biden

Thousands of pro-Trump protesters came to Capitol Hill Wednesday to prevent Congress from confirming the election for Joe Biden

The protesters were able to break through the Capitol and complete the certification process by walking through the halls, sitting at the desks of lawmakers and aides, facing law enforcement and breaking the doors of the chambers

The protesters were able to break through the Capitol and complete the certification process by walking through the halls, sitting at the desks of lawmakers and aides, facing law enforcement and breaking the doors of the chambers

Protesters could be heard knocking on doors as the senators tried to continue their debate on the number of electoral colleges.

Shortly after 2:30 p.m., the entire chamber was evacuated before the violation occurred, and protesters were able to find their way into the building.

As they stormed away the leaders of Congress, Senate officials grabbed the boxes of electoral college certificates and took them out.

The president's supporters wandered the convention halls and into the chambers of the House and Senate, sat at the desks of lawmakers and their aides, one literally hanging from the rafters on the side of the Senate balcony.

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