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Unpaid carers have spent an additional 92 MILLION hours caring for loved ones with dementia since the lockdown


Unpaid caregivers have spent an additional 92 MILLION hours caring for loved ones with dementia since the coronavirus was banned

  • The Alzheimer's Society noted that families had been forced to increase their care since March
  • This is partly due to the use of paid care services during the pandemic
  • It is estimated that women performed 62 million of those 92 million additional hours

Unpaid caregivers have spent an additional 92 million hours caring for loved ones with dementia since the lockdown – and women bear the brunt, as the numbers show today.

The Alzheimer's Society found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since late March.

This is partly due to the fact that paid care services contracted during the pandemic, just at the point when many people with dementia have seen their symptoms worsen due to isolation and anxiety, the charity said.

Unpaid caregivers have spent an additional 92 million hours caring for loved ones with dementia since the lockdown

It is estimated that women have done 62 million of those 92 million additional hours and are more inclined to take on caring tasks.

Of 1,102 unpaid caregivers surveyed, it was found that 68 percent of women felt more anxious, 52 percent had trouble sleeping, and 71 percent were constantly exhausted.

Of the men, 50 percent felt more anxious, 46 percent had trouble sleeping, and 63 percent were constantly exhausted.

Women make up about 67 percent of all unpaid caregivers and are more likely to quit work to look after older parents, in-laws, or spouses.

Kate Lee, executive director of the Alzheimer's Society, said, “I'm so angry that families and friends in the community are having to look after themselves as the people they love with dementia have receded before their eyes.

“You have fought against the chances of adequately caring for your loved ones. The government must never again leave families with dementia.

“Lessons must be learned to prevent another tragedy this winter.

"Coronavirus has made the terrible state of social care visible for everyone. The enduring legacy of this crisis must be a universal, field-free social care system that provides quality care to anyone with dementia who needs it. & # 39;

She added that the charity's hotline spoke every day to family carers who were "completely burned out" and working around the clock.

The charity has accused ministers of not doing enough to protect people with dementia and their loved ones during the pandemic.

Previous figures have shown that 25,000 patients died with the disease in March and April alone – twice as many as in previous years.

Although significant numbers of people with dementia succumbed to the virus itself, others died from conditions caused by social isolation and lack of medical care.

The extra care hours were calculated after asking 953 unpaid caregivers how much time they spent looking after their loved ones a week before and after the lockdown.

That number was then multiplied by the number of weeks since the lockdown and again by the estimated 470,757 unpaid carers across the UK.

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK said: “We know that many caregivers have gone to extreme lengths to protect their loved ones, including canceling their care packages, to reduce the risk of this deadly virus being brought into their home .

"The effects of this extra stress on the mind and body have become increasingly important as weeks have turned into months."

The Alzheimer's Society found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since late March

The Alzheimer's Society found that families and friends have been forced to dramatically increase their caring responsibilities since late March

Liz Kendall, Labor's social welfare spokesperson, said: “Families were an afterthought at best and ignored at worst.

& # 39; This report provides even more evidence of the dire burden Covid-19 has placed on families whose loved ones have dementia.

"Many families were marginalized from taking on additional responsibility for caring for their relatives, and thousands more were unable to visit their loved ones in dormitories."

A spokesman for the Ministry of Health and Welfare said: “We know this has been a particularly challenging time for people with dementia, and we continue to strive to provide them, their families and their carers with the information, advice and support that they need you need.

"As part of our Winter Adult Social Care Plan, we regularly test nursing home residents and staff and provide nursing homes with free PPE. We have allocated over £ 1.1 billion to support providers through our Infection Control Fund."

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