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UK coronavirus hospital deaths fell by two last weekend, with 368 victims


The government said an additional 397 people died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 on Saturday, bringing the total in the UK to 61,014.

Separate figures released by the UK statistical authorities for deaths where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate, as well as additional data on deaths that have occurred in the past few days, show that there are now 74,000 deaths from Covid-19 in the UK 19 gave.

The government said there had been an additional 15,539 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK as of 9 a.m. on Saturday.

The total number of cases in the UK is 1,705,971.

UK coronavirus hospital deaths are two times lower than last weekend. 368 victims are evidence that the second wave has flattened as a result of the coronavirus lockdown.

In England, 315 people died in hospital from coronavirus, while Wales recorded 24 deaths, Scotland 22 and Northern Ireland seven.

Health leaders recorded 504 casualties yesterday as a number of promising statistics confirmed that the second wave is fully retreating after the November lockdown.

Last Saturday, ÖOfficial numbers showed 479 coronavirus deaths – a 40 percent increase from 341 the week before. The official death toll in all facilities, including nursing homes, is currently more than 60,500 – the highest in Europe and the fifth highest total in the world.

However, Health Department figures showed that Friday's death toll – which, according to NHS England, included a 15-year-old with no known underlying medical conditions – was only marginally below the 521 announced Friday the week before.

The curve has been steadily falling for more than a fortnight, but officials announced an additional 16,298 cases yesterday, slightly above last week's 16,022.

In other coronavirus news today:

  • The British set out on an expected £ 1.5 billion shopping spree down the main streets to do their Christmas shopping after the lockdown ended.
  • Protesters gathered in Victoria Square in Birmingham and outside Stratford Station in east London this afternoon to call for an end to lockdown measures.
  • Furious Slough locals railed against rule violators who refused to wear masks or maintain social distance because the district was subject to strict Tier 3 restrictions.
  • Jenner Institute, the Oxford team behind a successful coronavirus vaccine, is about to enter the final stage of human trials with malaria.
  • Coronavirus vaccines are expected to be introduced into nursing homes and general practitioners' offices within 14 days after regulators confirmed that cans can be shipped in cooling bags to keep them cool enough.

In even more evidence that the UK's worst Covid resurgence is over, SAGE revealed that the R-rate has been falling for the fourth straight week and may now be as low as 0.8. The No. 10 Scientific Advisory Board claimed the outbreaks had receded in all parts of the country.

Scotland's first Covid vaccines arrive

Coronavirus vaccines have arrived in Scotland ahead of a nationwide vaccination battle.

The "first aid" was "safely" stored before the first vaccinations on Tuesday.

Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: & # 39; Some positive news – the first shipments of the Covid vaccine have now safely arrived in Scotland and are being stored safely.

"The first vaccinations are on track to be given on Tuesday."

And data from the Office for National Statistics showed that the number of daily coronavirus infections in England fell by almost half last month, from 47,700 a day to 25,700 in the week ending November 28, which is further evidence that the disease has gradually subsided. According to the report, a total of 521,300 people in England carried the virus on November 28, up from 665,000 just two weeks earlier.

Separate infection estimates made by the Covid Symptom Study say only 15,845 people develop symptoms of the coronavirus daily in England, up from a high of 44,000 in late October. Although the numbers are different from those of the ONS, they show the same downward trend.

Professor Tim Spector, the epidemiologist at King's College who is conducting this study, which is based on data from a public mobile app, said the signs are "encouraging," adding, "We're now (at) less than that Half of the peak of the second wave we saw in October. & # 39;

And various figures from Public Health England showed that every local authority in the north saw a drop in the rate of Covid-19 infection over the past week, leading to the growing question of whether millions of people have been unnecessarily forced into the toughest Tier-3 – Live curbs.

The promising numbers come as the UK is expected to become the first country in the world to start vaccinating people against Covid-19 next week after drug regulators gave the green light to a push developed by pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and BioNTech.

The first cans were dropped on British soil on Thursday via a convoy of unmarked trucks from Belgium, and the head of the NHS provider, Dr. Chris Hopson says the country plans to start vaccinating on Tuesday, December 8, with nursing home residents and staff as well as elderly hospital patients in front of the queue.

Coronavirus vaccines will be rolled out to nursing homes and general practitioners' offices within 14 days after regulators confirmed that cans can be shipped in cooling bags. In the picture, Matron May Parsons (right) talks to Heather Price (left) during training at the Covid-19 vaccination clinic of the University Hospital in Coventry

Coronavirus vaccines will be rolled out to nursing homes and general practitioners' offices within 14 days after regulators confirmed that cans can be shipped in cooling bags. In the picture, Matron May Parsons (right) talks to Heather Price (left) during training at the Covid-19 vaccination clinic of the University Hospital in Coventry

The Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) has yet to stamp the protocol to remove the fragile vaccine from the freezer process. However, the authorities assume that this will be fixed within a few days (photo in stock).

The Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) has yet to stamp the protocol to remove the fragile vaccine from the freezer process. However, authorities expect the problem to be resolved within a few days (photo in stock).

General practitioners were instructed last night to prepare to receive doses of the coronavirus vaccine in the week beginning December 14, with nursing homes expected to receive the vaccine in the same week.

HOW DIFFERENT IS THE OUTBREAK IN THE COUNTRY?

Regional differences across England show that some parts of the country are far more affected than others during the second wave of coronavirus.

The R-rate is generated by SAGE; daily infections from the Covid Symptom Study; and percentage of people infected by the ONS.

Not all are captured in the same way or in exactly the same timeframe, but they show a roughly consistent picture that falls are highest in the north but decreasing the fastest, while in the south they are lower but shrinking more slowly.

% from people Wear Coronavirus

East england

London

Midlands

NE / Yorkshire

northwest

South east

southwest

0.9 – 1.0

0.8-1.1

0.8-0.9

0.7-0.9

0.7-0.9

0.9-1.1

0.7 – 1.0

1.661

3,379

2,890

3.027

2.295

2.139

1,124

0.4%

0.7%

1.1 – 1.2%

1.6-1.7%

1.6%

0.6%

0.5%

NHS officials gave family doctors ten days' notice last night to prepare to receive vaccine supplies and start injecting the elderly and vulnerable.

In a letter, they said the GP central hubs would receive trays of 975 doses and use them all within three and a half days. The locations where the shocks are to be received will be confirmed on Monday.

In the meantime, people are so unlikely to receive Covid a second time that they could receive "immunity certificates" after a vaccine or confirmed illness, according to SAGE.

Advisory panel scientists said it was "likely" that people could be exempted from social distancing if they proved immune to coronavirus.

SAGE is made up of dozens of experts who interpret the research and explain it to government ministers in simple terms so that they can make policy decisions.

In a November report by the NERVTAG subgroup for infectious diseases, researchers said they had "high confidence" that people would become immune to coronavirus after being caught or vaccinated, causing the same response in the body without actually causing disease.

While it is possible for people to get sick a second time, it is rare, they said, and there wasn't good evidence that people could transmit the virus if they had some level of immunity.

Now that people in the UK are actually being vaccinated, it might be time for the government to consider immunity certificates for people who have had a sting, they said.

SAGE was nervous about whether immunity might wear off after six months, but suggested a "short-term" solution, saying that more data was needed.

Downing Street has toyed with the idea of ​​immunity certificates in the past but never announced a policy on the matter.

Michael Gove denied this week the British need "immunity certificates" to go to the pub – though a colleague of ministers said the prospect of some venues being able to insist on evidence that people were either sick or vaccinated before going in grant.

Currently, people who are given a vaccine to protect them from Covid-19 are still required to follow the same rules as everyone else, raising questions about whether people who are not at personal risk will volunteer for it.

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