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Trump's aides start the blame game and immediately focus on Jared Kushner for losing the election


Donald Trump's team has started the blame game for the failed presidential re-election bid and the early fire is on Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law, who serves as senior advisor to the White House.

Kushner wears many hats in the Trump world – de facto chief of staff, guardian of the president's mood, front man in the Middle East, coordinator of the coronavirus, and the minds behind re-election efforts.

He made it clear from the start that he was involved in all important election campaign decisions when it came to securing the president a second term. Brad Parscale, the former campaign manager who ran the campaign in the early days, reported to Kushner and was a loyalist to the president's son-in-law.

Jared Kushner watches as President Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday

Kushner is always present at the side of the president.

He was with Trump on his final two-day ten-state rally campaign sweep with seven states. The President took him on stage at a rally and got him noticed at several others, but most of the time the Kushner was backstage, focusing intensely on the scene of thousands of supporters cheering Trump on, few with face masks and without social distancing. Unlike other aides, Kushner did not dance the & # 39; YMCA & # 39; – the song that completed Trump rallies.

Kushner was also with the president on election day, visiting campaign headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, and spending the evening watching him and other members of the first family return to the White House residence.

"The only constant in this campaign from day one to the last was Kushner," an ally of Trump told the Washington Post. "So if the president wins, Kushner deserves credit, but if he loses, Kushner deserves the blame."

However, a senior administration official defended Kushner's work, saying that without her the 2020 contest outcome would be much worse.

"The expectation was that the campaign would be significantly exceeded, and thanks to the infrastructure Jared had put in place, several thousand votes were cast in some states," the chief administrative officer told DailyMail.com.

The votes are still counted, but Biden carried battlefield states like Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Nevada by a few percentage points.

Kimberly Guilfoyle, Donald Trump Jr.'s friend who led the campaign fundraiser, was also accused. Trump was taken by surprise by Biden and struggled to stay on the waves for the last few weeks of the campaign.

Campaigners told Politico that Guilfoyle's operation "was below par and was an HR nightmare".

Jared Kushner is constantly present at the side of President Donald Trump - above he can be seen behind the President with campaign manager Bill Stepien when Trump visited his campaign headquarters on election day

Jared Kushner is constantly present at the side of President Donald Trump – above he can be seen behind the President with campaign manager Bill Stepien when Trump visited his campaign headquarters on election day

President Trump was at his Virginia golf course on Saturday when the president's race was scheduled for Democratic rival Joe Biden

President Trump was at his Virginia golf course on Saturday when the president's race was scheduled for Democratic rival Joe Biden

Ivanka Trump and Jarrod Kushner applaud as President Donald J. Trump leaves the stage during a campaign visit at the Michigan Stars Sports Center in Washington, Michigan on Sunday

Ivanka Trump and Jarrod Kushner applaud as President Donald J. Trump leaves the stage during a campaign visit at the Michigan Stars Sports Center in Washington, Michigan on Sunday

Donald Trump Jr. and his girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle at President Trump's final campaign rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Donald Trump Jr. and girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle at President Trump's final campaign event in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Trump was spending his Saturday morning on the golf course at his Sterling, Virginia club, which is where he was when the race was called for Biden.

After playing 18 rounds, he stopped to snap a picture with a bride who was getting married there as supporters cheered him on, according to the video posted on Twitter.

He has shown no sign of concession and vowed in a statement released by the campaign that it is not over.

"The simple fact is that this election is far from over," said Trump.

In addition, President Biden will not make a license call.

"No schedule updates," White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere told DailyMail.com when asked if such a meeting would take place.

And President Trump has no immediate plans to invite Biden to a meeting in the Oval Office, a tradition between outgoing and incoming presidents, CNN reported. Then President Barack Obama hosted Trump on Thursday, November 10, 2016, two days after this year's presidential election.

Trump took an early lead in the vote count on Tuesday night, but as more ballots were counted, Biden began to move forward and the mood in the White House went dark.

The country was in suspense all week and news organizations declined to call the race while the ballots were still being counted. Trump's early lead in the counting of votes in Michigan, Wisconsin, Arizona, and Pennsylvania declined as the week wore on, and those states were called in to Biden one by one.

The president's mood was "black," a White House adviser told the Wall Street Journal ahead of Saturday's election results.

Added to the concerns of the White House was another coronavirus outbreak among its ranks.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and at least five other staff members tested positive for the disease after the election.

Meadows had escaped diagnosis when Trump caught the virus in September.

He was one of the toughest anti-maskers in the Trump administration, and insiders say he rarely wears a face mask out of respect for Trump.

The circled White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows was at the campaign headquarters with President Trump on Tuesday morning

The circled White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows was at the campaign headquarters with President Trump on Tuesday morning

President Trump has no immediate plans to invite Joe Biden to a meeting in the Oval Office, a tradition between outgoing and incoming presidents. Then, on Thursday, November 10, 2016, two days after this year's presidential election, President Barack Obama hosted such a meeting (above)

President Trump has no immediate plans to invite Joe Biden to a meeting in the Oval Office, a tradition between outgoing and incoming presidents. Then, on Thursday, November 10, 2016, two days after this year's presidential election, President Barack Obama hosted such a meeting (above)

Even before the presidential race was called, Trump showed public reluctance to concede his next move during an internal war between his family and advisors.

Just before Biden was declared the competition winner, Trump went to his Virginia golf club and on the track tweeted, "I won this election a lot!"

By the time Trump played golf and tweeted on Saturday, Rudy Giuliani, his personal attorney and one of the biggest supporters of the going-on-the-fight president, was in Pennsylvania leading a lawsuit to win the state – with no second term Trump card.

Giuliani held a press conference in Philadelphia with some election officials who he claimed had "been consistently deprived of their right to see part of the postal ballot papers."

He did not provide any evidence to support his allegations but said the campaign would launch a lawsuit on Monday.

The Trump campaign – despite all the lawsuits in the battlefield states – has not provided solid evidence of electoral fraud. And election observers – volunteers from both parties who watch officials count the ballots – did not report any major incidents during the count.

The campaign named David Bossie, a Trump adviser who is not a lawyer, to lead the legal challenges.

The campaign seems to be quietly preparing for a concession.

There are no plans for a key re-election official to attend any of Sunday's public affairs shows – the key programs that set the agenda for a week and give Trump's team a chance to argue the president's false allegation about illegal votes .

However, a concession would require one thing: President Trump's cooperation.

And nobody seems to know how to get him the news.

"They know he's lost, but nobody seems willing to tell King Lear or Mad King George that they have lost the empire," one Republican who was in frequent contact with the White House told Washington Post Office.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) White House (t) Coronavirus (t) Donald Trump