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Trump thanked the British SAS hero who saved the lives of the Americans in a terrorist attack in Nairobi


President Trump personally thanked a British SAS hero who shot dead two terrorists and rescued hostages, including Americans, during the Nairobi terrorist attack in 2019.

The elite soldier known as Chris Craighead announced that he met with the president last year by posting a photo of the meeting on Instagram on Monday.

Craighead said the meeting was unplanned and took place after Trump "heard … that I was in town" and "took the time to thank me personally for saving American lives."

He was honored after leaving the special forces after it was reported that his comrades were "shunned" and "jealous" of the attention he received when the SAS doctrine forced them to fight in the shadows.

A British Special Air Service hero who helped save Americans in a jihad attack on a Kenyan hotel in 2019 shared a photo of himself on Instagram Monday when he met President Donald Trump. The Instagram account bears the soldier's pseudonym, Christian Craighead

Craighead revealed some details about his meeting with Trump in the Instagram headline (above).

Craighead revealed some details about his meeting with Trump in the Instagram headline (above).

Craighead was stationed in Kenya to train the nation's soldiers when heavily armed jihadists from the al-Shabaab terrorist group seized the Dusit D2 luxury hotel complex in January 2019

The photo of Trump shaking Craighead's hand was taken by the soldier's fiancée, Shealah Craighead, who serves as the President's Chief Official Photographer.

As with all of Craighead's other photos, the lower half of his face was blurred to protect his identity, along with other potentially identifying items in the room.

"Last year I had the privilege of meeting the 45th President of the United States, Donald J. Trump," Craighead wrote.

“I'll leave that with you: the meeting was unplanned and he had nothing to gain from it. When he heard from key government figures that I was in town, he took the time to thank me personally for saving American lives. & # 39;

Craighead was in Kenya helping to train the country's security forces in 2019 when jihad fighters from the al-Shabaab terror group launched an attack on the DusitD2 hotel complex in the capital, Nairobi.

Although Craighead wasn't on duty or shopping at the time, he had his gear in his car, so he equipped himself and ran to the complex to help.

Craighead is engaged to Shealah Craighead (pictured), who is the President's Chief Official White House Photographer

Craighead is engaged to be Shealah Craighead (pictured), who is the President's Chief Official White House Photographer

After his arrival he organized "the entire operation" – according to SAS veteran Chris Ryan – including the management of the police and army.

Criaghead then carried out a one-man raid on the hotel complex, shot two militants and brought hostages to safety.

The footage from Craighead's solo mission has been shown around the world and earned him the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross (CGC), the UK's second highest military award.

But it also created friction between Criaghead and the rest of his SAS unit, who are used to operating out of the spotlight, their exploits largely going undetected.

In September of that year, it was announced that Craighead had left the unit and walked "disgusted" from his base in Hereford at being treated by "jealous" colleagues.

It was then that he launched his Instagram page and posted pictures of his time in the SAS as well as pictures of himself during the raid – including notes about his equipment, training and inspirational quotes.

The site had panicked British defense officials who feared legal action against Craighead to prevent him from revealing his identity or sensitive information.

Under strict rules, Special Forces troops are not allowed to publicly discuss their missions or attempt to profit from operations.

The rules were introduced after ex-soldiers Chris Ryan and Andy McNab caused a sensation, which dramatically raised the SAS's public profile and raised concerns that Special Forces troops were disclosing sensitive information that could jeopardize future operations.

Footage of Craighead's solo mission to end the siege of the Nairobi hotel has been shown around the world and he has been awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, Britain's second highest military award

Footage from Craighead's solo mission to end the siege of the Nairobi hotel has been shown around the world and has been awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, the UK's second highest military award

Craighead uses Instagram to promote equipment and weapons preferred by SAS troops – though it's unclear whether he'll be paid for the endorsements.

A source said: “We are concerned about his online actions and want to avoid any legal disputes with him.

"He is vulnerable after recently leaving the regiment where he felt undervalued by colleagues."

Craighead covers his mouth in all of his Instagram photos to protect his true identity

Craighead covers his mouth in all of his Instagram photos to protect his true identity

Senior officials said they wanted to speak to him urgently in case he reveals his identity or any sensitive information about Special Forces operations.

Top brass players were also alarmed by obvious plans for a book and film about the Africa mission and the man's friendship with Ryan, who embarked on a career in literature and film in Iraq after the Bravo Two Zero mission in the 1991 Gulf War.

But friends of the disgruntled veteran said the blame lay with SAS officers and troops for denying him credit for his action. One said, “There was a very bitchy reaction at the SAS camp for him getting a CGC.

At the time, other guys had fought against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria for months without official recognition.

“No one outside of the regiment will ever know what they did. So they turned their backs on him, which was really hard.

"He deserved several pats on his back and it's a shame his SAS career ended like this."

Craighead (right) carries a wounded man to safety during the hotel attack

Craighead (right) carries a wounded man to safety during the hotel attack

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