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Travel giant Tui announces the closure of 166 stores in the UK and Republic of Ireland


The holiday giant Tui closes 166 high street stores in Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland, the largest British tour operator has announced.

The decision was made after changes in customer behavior as a result of the pandemic, the company said in a statement. The English-German company described COVID-19 as the "biggest crisis" the aviation industry has ever faced.

Tui said it would try to relocate 70 percent of the 900 employees affected by the closure of the homework sales and service roles, and it would aim to move other employees to the remaining high street stores.

It announced it would cut 8,000 jobs worldwide after losing £ 747m in 2020 compared to £ 255m in the same period last year.

The announcement comes after Tui canceled all flights to mainland Spain up to and including August 9 after the government removed Spain from the list of safe destinations in the UK, warning "No trip is risk-free".

The timing of the U-turn has sparked widespread anger in the aviation industry, as it is feared that this will be the “last nail in the coffin” for some tourism companies.

The global aviation industry has been hit by the effects of the corona virus. The tremendous drop in demand for international travel resulted in thousands of aircraft being grounded and the number of employees reduced.

In a statement released today, Andrew Flintham, managing director of Tui in the UK and Ireland, said: & # 39; We want to be in the best position to provide excellent customer service, be it in a shop on the main street, by phone or online, and we will continue to focus on our customers.

Holiday giant Tui will close 166 high street stores in the UK and Republic of Ireland, the UK's largest tour operator has announced

The decision was made after changes in customer behavior as a result of the pandemic, the company said in a statement. The English-German company described COVID-19 as the "biggest crisis" the aviation and travel industry has ever faced

The decision was made after changes in customer behavior as a result of the pandemic, the company said in a statement. The English-German company described COVID-19 as the "biggest crisis" the aviation and travel industry has ever faced

& # 39; It is therefore imperative that we make these difficult cost decisions, look after our colleagues in such unprecedented uncertainty, and also offer modern customer service.

& # 39; Customer behavior has changed in recent years. 70 percent of all bookings with Tui UK are made online.

How Coronavirus Affected UK Airlines Last Month

Flybe: Europe's largest regional airline collapsed marginally on March 5 after months, resulting in 2,400 job losses and around 15,000 passengers stuck across the UK and Europe.

British Airways: The International Airlines Group, which also includes Iberia and Aer Lingus, said on March 16 that passenger capacity would be reduced by 75 percent for two months. Chef Willie Walsh admitted that there is no guarantee that many European airlines would survive. The company has since announced plans to reduce the number of employees by 12,000.

easyJet: The airline with 9,000 employees in the UK, including 4,000 cabin crew, brought its entire fleet of 344 aircraft to the ground on March 30th.

Loganair: The Scottish regional airline announced on March 30 that it would ask the government for a bailout to deal with the effects of the pandemic.

Jet2: The low cost airline has discontinued all flights from the UK until April 30th. A number of Jet2 flights revolved in the air last month as they traveled to Spain when a blockade in the country was announced.

Virgin Atlantic: The airline announced on March 16 that it would have reduced its lighting by 80 percent by March 26, and this will increase to 85 percent by April. It has also called on the government to offer airlines up to £ 7.5 billion in emergency credit facilities.

Ryanair: More than 90 percent of the Irish airline's aircraft are now on the ground, the rest of the aircraft offer return and rescue flights. Michael O & # 39; Leary, CEO of Ryanair, said his airline was forced to cut 3,000 jobs while the remaining people would strive to cut wages by up to 20 percent.

& # 39; We believe COVID-19 has only accelerated this change in buying habits because people want to shop online or want to speak to travel experts from the comfort of their own home.

"We have first class travel consultants at Tui, so we hope that many of them do their homework and continue to provide the personal service that our customers appreciate."

Tui has already closed 70 travel agencies in France and lost almost 600 jobs in Europe.

It is hoped that the restructuring "will allow Tui France to break even in 2021".

Tui said that in the future they will focus on "high-margin business with some core brands" as costs are to be reduced by 30 percent worldwide.

In a statement, Tui said, "The project provides for 583 job cuts in the scenario of closing all of its own retail stores, which is approximately 60 percent of Tui France's current workforce."

"The changes are now being discussed with the relevant committees and employee representatives in France."

It added: & # 39; Tui France was loss-making even before the pandemic. The company had made losses in a structurally challenging market with a high cost structure and low margins in recent years.

& # 39; After the corona pandemic, the situation for Tui France has deteriorated considerably again. A far-reaching package of measures is now required to create a perspective for the company within the group. & # 39;

The Transport Salaried Staffs & # 39; Association (TSSA) today condemned what it called "the government's failure to save the rescue industry."

Manuel Cortes, secretary general of TSSA, who represents travel industry employees, said: “We have been warning for weeks that high street travel businesses may be a thing of the past if the government does not take urgent measures to help our industry deal with this crisis . TUI's announcement today means ministers must sit up, smell the coffee and act immediately.

& # 39; We need a tailored package of measures to save our travel industry. I urge TUI and other employers to look at our union so that we can stand up for the government together. "

Fritz Joussen, managing director of the troubled giant, said the company should "emerge stronger from the crisis."

He added: & # 39; It will be a different case and it will find a different market environment than before the pandemic. This requires cuts: in investments, in costs, in our size and in our global presence.

"We have to be leaner than before, more efficient, faster and more digital."

The company's report said: "The tourism industry has weathered a number of macroeconomic shocks over the past few decades, but the Covid 19 pandemic is undoubtedly the biggest crisis the industry and Tui have ever faced."

It added that losses also occurred after the Boeing 737 Max plane landed after two crashes with other airlines.

This week, Ryanair announced £ 168m losses during the pandemic, but insisted that the flight to Spain continue after British tourists were instructed not to travel there.

The low-cost airline, like its competitors, was forced to establish its fleet when Covid-19 devastated flight schedules with worldwide travel bans and barriers.

In a statement, Andrew Flintham, CEO of Tui in the UK and Ireland, said: “We want to be in the best position to provide excellent customer service, whether in a main street store, by phone or online, and we will continue to serve the customer the heart of what we do & # 39;

In a statement, Andrew Flintham, managing director of Tui in the UK and Ireland, said: “We want to be in the best position to provide excellent customer service, be it in a main street store, by phone or online, and we will continue to serve the customer the heart of what we do & # 39;

The UK's largest tour operator posted losses of € 845.8 million (£ 747 million) in the first half of 2020, compared to € 289.1 million (£ 255 million) in the same period 12 months earlier

The UK's largest tour operator posted losses of € 845.8 million (£ 747 million) in the first half of 2020, compared to € 289.1 million (£ 255 million) in the same period 12 months earlier

Ryanair said it had the "hardest" quarter in its 35-year history after carrying 500,000 passengers from April to June, compared to 41.9 million in the same period last year. The stock price fell 8 percent this morning in early trading.

Meanwhile, revenue plummeted from GBP 2.1 billion to GBP 113 million. The Dublin-based airline said a second wave of the disease is now their "biggest fear".

Neil Sorahan, CFO, told BBC Radio 4 that flights to Spain would not be cut, saying, "From today's perspective, the market remains open, flight schedules remain, and we continue to operate in and out of Spain as usual."

When he spoke about the British government, which is advising against coronavirus not to travel to Spain, he told Reuters: “I find it unfortunate, very disappointing.

"I have no doubt that we will see other localized outbreaks, and we need to be flexible enough to deal with them when they occur in the coming weeks and months."

He added that the Spanish government has made it clear that the country remains open to tourists and infection rates are low in large parts of the country.

"NO trip is risk free": Number 10 warns travelers that EVERY country could suddenly be included in the quarantine list as Jet2 cancels all Spanish holidays and warns travel agents of a wave of cancellations in France, Italy and Greece

Downing Street risked more confusion among British vacationers and travel agents, warning of the wave of cancellations triggered by a shocking U-turn in quarantine for arrivals from Spain.

# 10 could not assure that the decision to isolate people traveling from the popular vacation destination to 14 days after being released to circumvent the health restriction would not be extended to other countries with a coronavirus increase.

It comes when Jet2 canceled all public holidays on the Spanish mainland and the Spanish islands from tomorrow until August 16 after Tui also moved.

Secretary of Transport Grant Shapps has canceled his own Spanish vacation tonight and will return to the UK on Wednesday to begin his own quarantine period. He admits that relaxing while others are suffering doesn't feel right.

It is believed that the decision by Spain, which gave vacationers five hours' notice on Saturday, frightened many people who had booked trips to France, Italy and Greece, with operators already reporting "many cancellations".

A Ryanair spokesman said: & # 39; The past quarter was the biggest challenge in Ryanair's 35-year history.

& # 39; COVID-19 grounded the group's fleet for almost four months (from mid-March to late June) when EU governments imposed flight or travel bans and widespread population closures.

"During this time, group airlines returned customers and performed rescue flights for various EU governments, as well as a number of medical emergency / PSA flights across Europe."

Flights resumed on July 1 and the company said it plans to operate around 40 percent of its normal July flight schedule, up to 60 percent in August and 70 percent in September.

Meanwhile, British Airways faced an "immediate" threat from union bosses to cut jobs because it was feared that families trying to plan a vacation abroad could experience further travel chaos.

Len McCluskey, chairman of Unite, claimed that BA boss Alex Cruz "released a schedule to fire and re-hire thousands of your workforce on August 7".

Mr McCluskey also told how MPs and newspapers equally condemned the Spanish boss's actions, adding, "Perhaps you don't understand that the British sense of fair play is deep in the psyche of the British people."

It is because the government has advised against traveling to Spain after the appearance of a second wave of corona viruses in parts of the country.

BA has so far taken advantage of government vacation programs, accessed £ 300m in UK government loans and discontinued its fleet of 747 jumbo jets earlier than planned.

The airline, which is owned by the International Airlines Group, has also implemented a large layoff plan after originally announcing to cut up to 12,000 roles.

She signed a contract with her pilot union last week to lay off fewer people – 270 fewer than planned for 1,250 layoffs – in return for other employees cutting wages.

However, sources close to the airline said it was wrong to say that all BA employees will be fired or will have to sign a new contract from August 7.

In the letter, Mr. McCluskey said that he had received a letter from Mr. Cruz himself on Sunday, but was "both staggered and offended" by his arrogance.

A fleet of British Airways Boeing 747 at London Heathrow Airport (file image)

A fleet of British Airways Boeing 747 at London Heathrow Airport (file image)

Unite leader Len McCluskey

Alex Cruz, CEO of British Airways (

Unite leader Len McCluskey (left) wrote to British Airways CEO Alex Cruz (right).

The airlines refuse to cancel flights to Spain, although the government advises against all but essential travel

The airlines refuse to cancel flights to Spain – although the government advises against all but essential travel.

The move levitates hundreds of thousands of British families and threatens to lose thousands of pounds. It also conflicts with the British government by ignoring a public security edict.

The government issued the travel warning after the appearance of a second wave of corona viruses in parts of Spain.

Customers would normally expect travel agents to cancel flights and offer refunds. But all major airlines that have suffered massive losses after the collapse of air traffic have insulted the government and continue to offer the flights.

This means that families may lose their vacation and money.

People could ignore the government and take their flights. But they would have to be quarantined for 14 days when they come back and their travel insurance may be invalid.

Alternatively, you can cancel your trip with no refund guarantee. British Airways and easyJet have proposed offering vouchers for future flights instead of a refund for those who cancel.

Ryanair has refused to offer anything. It has even been suggested that people who have changed their flights could charge up to £ 95 per person.

The Civil Aviation Authority said nothing can be done to ensure that those who book only one flight will receive a refund. Recovery of money from travel insurance has been suggested, but most insurers have clauses that deny corona virus claims.

The union boss wrote: "In the first paragraph you say:" It took you a long time to recognize and accept this. "

& # 39; This reference suggests that I am only now beginning to understand the financial difficulties that British Airways is facing. How dare you propose something like that?

"I have been trying to get you to understand the need to treat your workers with respect and dignity for months, and this is the only way to overcome this pandemic together.

"It is your people, not you, who have built British Airways' good name for many years and have contributed £ billion to profitability every year."

Mr. McCluskey added that Mr. Cruz and his management team "pulled British Airways' good name through the mud".

The union leader continued: “Have you ever wondered why so many top level MPs have condemned British Airways or why newspapers and the media have been horrified by your actions?

"Perhaps you don't understand that the British sense of fair play is deep in the psyche of the British people."

Mr. McCluskey added: “My shop stewards and staff speak to members all the time and deal with the stress, anxiety and heartache caused by your leadership style and strategy.

“Instead of criticizing Unite's staff, you should actually listen to them instead of pretending so that you can tick a checkbox and finally realize that this is the only way to have lasting peace and avoid months / years of industrial unrest work with us to find an acceptable way forward.

“You have now published a schedule to fire and re-hire thousands of your employees on August 7th. We'll work every hour until then to convince you not to.

“You can consider this letter as our obligation to do so. However, you can also see this as an intention to defend our members by moving to industrial action with immediate effect. & # 39;

BA is currently operating 15 percent of its normal schedule and losing £ 20m a day, effectively closing two of its largest markets, the United States and India.

A BA spokesman told MailOnline: & # 39; British Airways has been flying millions of people around the world for more than 100 years. Today this world remains largely closed.

& # 39; This is the biggest challenge that the airline and our industry have ever faced. Unfortunately, the global pandemic has resulted in job losses in all industries. Many airlines have already fired thousands of employees.

A British Airways Boeing 747 will be on display at London Heathrow earlier this month on July 17

A British Airways Boeing 747 will be on display at London Heathrow earlier this month on July 17

& # 39; We are not immune to this crisis. We have to adapt to survive, so we will continue the proper, legitimate consultation process and continue to invite union representatives to discuss our proposals for the serious challenges we face.

"It's not too late to find solutions – as we did at Balpa (British Airline Pilots Association) – and protect jobs."

It comes after wiping £ 1.5 billion off the value of the UK's leading travel companies yesterday when the quarantine chaos and fear of a second wave of coronavirus infections rocked the markets.

Investors dropped stakes in airlines and tour operators after the government removed Spain from the quarantine-free list within a few hours.

Thousands of vacationers have canceled trips to Spain and countries like France and Germany because they fear they will be the next.

In the letter published yesterday, Mr. McCluskey said he received a letter from Mr. Cruz himself on Sunday, but was "both staggered and offended" by his arrogance.

In the letter published yesterday, Mr. McCluskey said he received a letter from Mr. Cruz himself on Sunday, but was "both staggered and offended" by his arrogance.

At the same time, Ryanair alarmed about a deadly second wave that occurred later that year during the flu season.

IAG fell 5.9 percent, Ryanair 3.9 percent, Easyjet 8 percent, Jet 2 owner Dart 8.5 percent, and Wizz Air 4.5 percent.

At the same time, the largest British tour operator Tui fell by 11.4 percent, while the cruise operator Carnival fell by 8.4 percent.

IAG lost about 70 percent of its value on the stock exchange this year, while Tui lost 68 percent, Easyjet 62 percent and Ryanair 28 percent.

The pandemic came at a time when the industry was already tense due to concerns about fierce competition and low consumer confidence.

The regional airline Flybe went bankrupt in March and in September last year Thomas Cook collapsed, leaving 150,000 British holidaymakers stranded abroad.

In the meantime, Richard Branson has controversially asked the British government for an emergency loan to save Virgin Atlantic from the collapse. Virgin Australia has entered voluntary administration.

Countless holidays have been canceled since the Federal Foreign Office advised against all but essential travel in March.

With no end date in sight and the government now trying to enforce a 14-day quarantine period for travelers returning to the UK by plane, it is very likely that many families will not be able to go abroad in the foreseeable future.

Even so, many readers of Money Mail said that they are still being asked to pay more money for trips that they are certain they cannot do.

In the UK, at least 66,102 jobs are at risk from the ongoing coronavirus crisis

The table below shows how many jobs in UK companies are at risk

Dyson – 600

Southbank Center – 400

DFS furniture – 200

Centrica – 5,000

Johnson Matthey – 2,500

Accenture – 900

Airbus – 1,700

Arcadia – 500

BA – 12,000

Beales – 1,052

Bentley – 1,000

Burberry – 150 at risk

Burger King – 1,600

Casual Dining Group (Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas) – 1,900

DHL at Jaguar Land Rover – 2,200

EasyJet – 4,500

Go outdoors – 2,400

The guardian – 180 in danger

BBC – 520

Harrods – 700

Harveys – 240

Left – 350

Maternity care – 2,500

Oasis Warehouse – 1,800

P&O Ferries – 1,100

Pret a Manger – 1,330

Ryanair – 3,000

Skyscanner – 300 (84 in Edinburgh)

Upper crust, Caffe Ritazza – 5,000

Ted Baker – 160

TM Lewin – 600

Tui – 8,000

Victoria's Secret – 800 Endangered

M&S – 950

Selfridges – 450

Don't panic, Boris: Experts urge ministers not to overreact to rising coronavirus cases and bring the economy to a standstill after PM feared a second wave in Britain in TWO WEEKS after an increase in Covid cases 28% will occur

By Stephen Matthews Health Editor and Mark Duell for MailOnline, Jason Groves Political Editor and Sophie Borland Health Editor for the Daily Mail

Ministers do not need to panic yet as coronavirus cases are increasing in the UK. Leading experts insisted today after it became known that Boris Johnson feared a second wave could begin in 14 days.

A senior government source told the mail that the prime minister was "extremely concerned" with outbreaks that "bubble up" both at home and across Europe. A surge in infections across Spain sparked the last minute decision to put the vacation hotspot on the UK's quarantine list.

But Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, tried to calm the nation today and said, "Give us a couple of weeks before we panic." He said that MailOnline cases in the UK are getting faster, but not escalating quickly, and that it is possible that we can survive August without taking general measures to prevent another crisis.

A scientist warned that the surge was "to be expected" as the ban was lifted earlier this month as millions of Britons flocked to pubs to celebrate "Super Saturday" and enjoy their first taste of freedom in 15 weeks. Another claimed that Britain knew that the virus had not been cleared and "we should learn to live with it".

Business leaders have been cautious today about the prospect that stricter restrictions will be introduced as the cases go on. Top corporations say it is "vital" that economies crippled by coronavirus control measures begin the recovery process this summer before an expected resurgence occurs later this year.

Amid fears that Britain is on the way to the worst recession in 300 years since the virus has caused thousands of job losses, the UK Industry Association, which represents nearly 200,000 companies, warned that companies "once, but not twice," put down can be ". and today said "health and economy go hand in hand".

But a Tory MP today insisted that the government's strategy was not about eradicating the virus, but about keeping the economy alive. The ministers wanted people to travel and work again. However, the head of the British Medical Association warned that number 10 was not doing enough to stop a second wave.

Although the number of cases in the UK is relatively small, increases have been recorded every day for the first time since the darkest days of the crisis in April last week. The seven-day moving average is 726-33 percent above the four-month low of 546 three weeks ago. Britain also recorded 83 more deaths today.

Ministers have warned of a possible second wave of the pandemic this winter, but fear that it may occur earlier. During a visit to Nottingham yesterday, Mr Johnson, who downplayed the prospect of another national ban earlier this month, said the British should not be on guard.

He added: "The important thing is that everyone in all communities follows the advice, follows the advice, does not accidentally spread it, and puts it down properly, and we will be able to relax restrictions across the country.

"But I'm afraid we are now clearly facing the risk of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant."

It happens after a leading virologist warned Germany – where infections almost doubled from week to week – that a second blockage cannot be avoided if it is hit by a second wave. For comparison: Sweden, which opposed the global trend and decided against draconian measures, sees a "very positive" downward trend in some cases.

In other corona virus developments today:

  • Ministers warned that there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad, claiming that Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.
  • Number 10 signed a contract with pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur for 60 million doses of a fourth experimental Covid-19 vaccine – although it has not yet been tested on humans.
  • Nursing homes were "blamed on the wolves" during the pandemic and government measures were "at times negligent," the MPs said in a damning report.
  • The cost of Number 10's vacation program has exceeded £ 30 billion this week – but won't prevent unemployment from rising above 10 percent, a leading think tank warned.
  • Britain's beauty spots are flooded with campers and campsites that are filled to bursting, causing disgruntled locals to take action to stop the "tidal wave" of vacationers destroying their areas.
  • Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.
  • Ten people caught corona virus in a 17th-century pub in a market town where up to 200 drinkers were filmed "like sardines" in a beer garden.
A senior government source told Mail that the Prime Minister (who is jogging today on a public footpath near Checkers with his dog Dilyn near Checkers) is "extremely concerned" about outbreaks that are "bubbling up" both at home and across Europe.

A senior government source told Mail that the Prime Minister (who is jogging today on a public footpath near Checkers with his dog Dilyn near Checkers) is "extremely concerned" about outbreaks that are "bubbling up" both at home and across Europe.

UK cases are up 14% within a week – and officials report 83 more deaths

Britain's coronavirus cases have risen 14 percent in a week, but experts have urged ministers not to panic, saying that Britain has to learn to live with the disease.

Ministry of Health officials reported a further 763 cases, for a total of 300,692.

The 581 cases reported yesterday were almost 30 percent above the previous week, raising concerns that Britain is headed for a significant increase in the cases.

Boris Johnson fears that a second wave could begin within 14 days, according to a high-ranking government source who told Mail that the prime minister was "extremely concerned" about outbreaks that "inflated" both at home and across Europe.

But leading scientists are instructing ministers not to panic yet. A scientist said the surge was "expected" as the blockage was loosened earlier this month as millions of Britons flocked to pubs to celebrate "Super Saturday" and enjoy their first taste of freedom in 15 weeks.

A further 83 coronavirus deaths were recorded in the UK, bringing the official death toll to 45,961. There were no deaths in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Around 66 people die of the disease every day, on average a slow decline of almost 1,000 during the height of the pandemic.

Mr Johnson is said to have been startled by the resurgence of the virus in parts of the United States and Europe after the blockade was loosened.

Cases in Spain doubled last week, while the Belgian government warned of a second "complete block" unless the outbreaks get under control.

The head of the German health authority said yesterday that he was "very concerned" about rising infection rates.

A Downing Street source said, "The Prime Minister is extremely concerned about what he sees abroad and fears that we could see the same thing here in a fortnight.

“People have to realize that we are still in the middle of a pandemic. He wants to open things up and get people back to work, but he knows that if something goes wrong it will be his head on the block. & # 39;

It comes after a World Health Organization official said last night that any peaks in cases are not a sign of a second wave and revealed that the pandemic is only turning into a "big wave".

Margaret Harris of the UN agency said, "The best thing is to plate it and turn it into something that is at your feet."

Professor Linda Bauld, a public health expert at the University of Edinburgh, told The Guardian: "The second wave is currently not a term we would use (in epidemiology) because the virus has not disappeared."

"It is in our population, it has spread to 188 countries so far, and what we are seeing now are essentially localized peaks or a localized return of a large number of cases."

Professor Hunter spoke about the reappearance of the virus in the UK and told MailOnline: “I don't care what you call it, there is no really correct definition that is generally accepted, what is a second wave and what is not.

"However, the reality is that the number of cases is increasing again in several European countries." One of the great things we are seeing right now is that most areas in the UK are still infection free.

BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG AND CROATIA "ADD TO UK TRAVEL QUARANTINE LIST"

Ministers today warned that there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad and claim that Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.

The British government announced on Saturday that it would ban all non-essential travel to Spain. Travelers returning to the UK have to isolate themselves for 14 days.

This decision sparked a diplomatic dispute with Madrid, but Mr. Johnson insisted that the United Kingdom reserve the right to impose restrictions to prevent domestic increases in some cases.

It is now believed that Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow. In the meantime, ministers are expected to monitor the situation in Croatia closely, but according to The Times, action against this country is not expected to be imminent.

The travel industry urges the government to shorten the 14-day quarantine period to make travel abroad more practical in the face of these uncertainties. The head of Heathrow Airport suggests border tests could be the answer. But Minister of Culture Oliver Dowden poured cold water on the plan today, saying that there is currently no "viable alternative to 14-day quarantine".

& # 39; And most of the increase is in a relatively small part of the UK area. This seems to be the case in Spain and probably in other countries as well. & # 39;

When asked how to deal with an increase in infections, he added: “You can really see local increases and apply local locks, or you can reintroduce national restrictions that we recently relaxed.

“At the moment it is going so fast, but not so fast (maybe) that we could survive August – but then really tough decisions have to be made in September or October.

"If it increases like in Spain, difficult decisions will have to be made very soon." He added that he was hopeful but not confident that the current whack-a-mole-style strategy was sufficient to combat local flare-ups.

Professor Jose Vazquez-Boland, Chair of Infectious Diseases at Edinburgh University, said: “We are facing a comeback of community transmission after the blockade has been lifted.

“We have to be aware that the effectiveness of locks is only temporary. Every time social security restrictions are lifted, new cases will arise as long as the virus remains in circulation.

“It is important to take into account that if SARS-CoV-2 is not eliminated, we will most likely have to deal with new incidence peaks. These peaks can flatten out if previously exposed individuals become immune. However, it is currently unclear whether this will happen. & # 39;

Professor James Naismith, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute, said: & # 39;Britain has never been free from infection. There have been 100 cases a day since March.

The number of people receiving unemployment benefits rose a record-high from 856,500 to 2.1 million in the first month of Coronavirus blocking, despite the vacation program, in which millions remain formally in work.

Matthew Fell, chief executive of the Confederation of British Industry in the UK, told MailOnline today: & # 39; Many companies are gradually and safely reopening after a long hibernation.

“During the pandemic, companies knew that health and business go hand in hand.

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

GERMANY IS NOT ABLE TO AVOID ANOTHER LOCKDOWN IF THE SECOND WAVE HITS, EXPERT WARNED

Germany will not be able to avoid a second blockage if it is hit by a second wave of coronavirus cases, a leading virologist has warned.

Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit said that "drastic measures" would be on the table again if the German health system were overwhelmed by virus cases – a nightmare scenario that Germany has avoided so far.

Fear of a second wave is increasing in Germany after an increase of 4,127 new cases last week compared to 2,385 two weeks ago.

Experts are concerned because the virus spreads across the country and is not limited to a handful of local clusters. The R rate is now regularly above 1.0.

Schmidt-Chanasit from the University of Hamburg told ARD yesterday evening that "the situation is still manageable" but warned that it could "get out of control very quickly".

Germany has suffered four daily jumps from 600 or more coronavirus cases in the past six days after not seeing any since the end of June

Germany has suffered four daily jumps from 600 or more coronavirus cases in the past six days after not seeing any since the end of June

& # 39; The number of cases was expected to increase as the blockage subsides and the spread of the virus increases.

"The government intervention that makes the biggest difference in suppressing this flare is isolating positive cases."

“I am still concerned that insufficient efforts have been made to take isolation measures. It is self-destructive to slander young people who are contagious but are otherwise good at not wanting to continue to make disproportionate financial and lifelong sacrifices. & # 39;

He added: “Testing and tracking will all be free if infectious people don't isolate. Without effective isolation, we will only have a more detailed view of an evolving tragedy. Locking is just a blunt method of isolation.

“We all still have a role to play, to isolate when we are sick or test positive, to wash our hands regularly, to distance ourselves socially and to wear a mask inside.

“I'm afraid if we don't control this flare-up, we will start the winter months with a high percentage of circulating viruses.

& # 39; With normal winter diseases and better indoor living, we were then able to see a return to exponential growth in Covid-19 cases that overwhelmed the NHS and required complete closure. Many scientists have repeatedly stressed that we only have a short time to prepare our systems to prevent this. & # 39;

Dr. Gail Carson, Leiterin einer internationalen Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern, die schwere akute Atemwegserkrankungen wie Covid-19 untersuchen, fügte hinzu: „Wir wussten, dass SARS-CoV2 nicht eliminiert wurde und dass wir lernen sollten, mit einem Paket von zu leben Maßnahmen wie soziale Distanzierung, Kontaktverfolgung, Händehygiene und Tragen von Stoffmasken, möglicherweise sogar lokalisierte Versionen von Lockdown.

"Die Erwähnung von" Wellen "bezieht sich normalerweise auf Influenza-Epidemien und eine Saisonalität, wenn sie in den kühleren Wintermonaten ihren Höhepunkt erreicht. Dies ist keine Grippe, es ist SARS-CoV-2 und wir lernen immer noch, wie wir am besten damit umgehen können. '

Apocalyptic forecasts by the Bank of England and others have already shown that Britain is on the way to the worst recession in 300 years when the Great Frost conquered Europe due to the closure.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak has warned that there will be "unprecedented pain" while the prestigious IFS think tank has described the impending collapse as a "mega-recession" or "recession to end all recessions".

Boris Johnson introduced himself yesterday when he visited Nottingham, where he expressed fears of a second attack on Covid-19

Boris Johnson introduced himself yesterday when he visited Nottingham, where he expressed fears of a second attack on Covid-19

OLDHAM TAKES OVER LEICESTER TO BE THE SECOND WORST AREA IN ENGLAND – WHERE ARE THE CURRENT HOTSPOTS?

Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.

Official NHS statistics show that 128 people were diagnosed with Covid-19 in the Greater Manchester city over the seven days to July 26. This corresponds to a rate of 54.3 cases per 100,000 people. By comparison, the rate in Leicester – the only place in the UK affected by a local blockage – is 53.2. Blackburn with Darwen is the current hotspot at a rate of 85.9.

Oldham's council chairmen yesterday urged all of the district's 235,000 residents not to let visitors into their home for at least two weeks to "prevent a strict local ban from being imposed."

It puts Oldham in conflict with the rest of England after the blockade rules were finally relaxed earlier this month so people could stay with loved ones after not being allowed to go to other homes for months.

Which areas currently have the highest infection rates?

Blackburn with Darwen

Oldham

Leicester

Bradford

Trafford

Rochdale

Sandwell

Calderdale

Manchester

Kirklees

85.9 – plus 6%

54.3 – plus 191%

53.2 – minus 27%

45.1 – plus 6%

36.8 – plus 235%

32.7 – 31% less

30.9 – plus 33%

28.6 – plus 22%

22.1 – plus 55%

19.8 – minus 29%

Source: NHS. Data refer to cases registered between July 20-26, the latest available numbers

& # 39; Companies are committed to making their full contribution to minimizing the risk of further increases and following government guidelines to ensure that their jobs are Covid-safe.

"Working safely is the best way to get the economy back on its feet while protecting jobs and livelihoods."

Herr Johnson hat vor zwei Wochen die Aussicht auf eine zweite nationale Coronavirus-Sperrung heruntergespielt und erklärt, er wolle sie nicht mehr als die britische nukleare Abschreckung Trident einsetzen.

Er sagte, die Behörden könnten lokale Ausbrüche besser identifizieren und isolieren, obwohl es wichtig sei, dass die Befugnis, nationale Maßnahmen anzuordnen, in Reserve gehalten werde.

Whitehall sources confirmed yesterday that Mr. Johnson's caution was reflected in the controversial decision to extend Spain's travel ban to the country's Balearic and Canary Islands, where the number of cases is lower.

The decision triggered a diplomatic conflict with Spain and the nation Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez described the travel restrictions as "mistakes" and Tourists in most regions would be safer than in the UK.

Transport Minister Grant Shapps and Foreign Minister Dominic Raab are both said to have spoken out against the extension of the travel ban to the Spanish islands, which the Prime Minister overruled on Monday.

Ministers decided to quarantine Spain again after it was found that 10 British coronaviruses had returned from the country, and Professor Chris Whitty said "doing nothing is not an option" was announced yesterday.

As the ministers warned today, there is no silver bullet to save the summer vacation abroad, and claims that Belgium and Luxembourg could soon be added to the UK travel quarantine list.

In the meantime, ministers are expected to monitor the situation in Croatia closely, but according to The Times, action against this country is not expected to be imminent.

A Whitehall source said: “The Prime Minister was determined to ensure that we have a clear and consistent message about Spain, regardless of the situation in each region.

"That's fair enough, but you can see why Spain is upset because it treats the whole country as if it were as bad as the worst region."

The government source – which was not mentioned – added: "If other countries did this to us, they would judge the whole country according to the situation in Leicester."

The figures released yesterday show that the rolling 7-day average of cases continued to increase over the month, from 546 cases on July 5 to 697 on July 25 – an increase of 28 percent.

Sonnenhungrige und Familien strömen heute zum Strand von Lyme Regis in Dorset, um das sengende heiße Wetter zu genießen. Später in dieser Woche werden in London und Südostengland Temperaturen von bis zu 33 ° C erwartet

Sonnenhungrige und Familien strömen heute zum Strand von Lyme Regis in Dorset, um das sengende heiße Wetter zu genießen. Später in dieser Woche werden in London und Südostengland Temperaturen von bis zu 33 ° C erwartet

GOVERNMENT SIGNED £ 500MILL OFFER WITH GSK AND SANOFI FOR 60MILLION CAN OF FOURTH FOUR COVID-19 VACCINE

Ministers today signed a contract with pharmaceutical giants GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi Pasteur for 60 million doses of another potential Covid-19 vaccine.

Number 10 has now secured four different types of unproven coronavirus shocks, giving the UK access to a total of 250 million doses – enough to give everyone four in the UK if they work.

Scientists have not yet tested the GSK / Sanofi vaccine on humans, and studies showing that it works won't start until September.

The Department of Enterprise, Energy and Industry Strategy said the vaccine – supposedly costing £ 500m – could be given to high-risk Britons in the first half of next year if studies show it works.

The UK has started to support experimental jabs around the world in its spread bet approach last month, hoping that at least one of them will pay off.

Downing Street admitted last night that the prime minister was concerned about the situation abroad, but downplayed the idea that the risk of an upturn in Britain was imminent.

There are no immediate plans to reinstate restrictions nationwide. A # 10 source said, "We haven't seen a sharp rise yet, but we're concerned.

“We don't want to know what some other countries are experiencing, and it would be a thorn in our side if we weren't looking for steps to prevent it.

“That means we have to make sure that we don't import cases from abroad. But it also means that people here have to be vigilant and maintain social distance.

"The virus didn't migrate for the summer and we always said that if we have to, we'll put the handbrake back on."

It is believed that Professor Whitty is concerned about the risk of the virus being "sown" by vacationers returning from abroad, especially since many people who get the virus show no symptoms.

He also monitors about a dozen boroughs that have been put on an “watch list” because of high or rapidly increasing infection rates, including Peterborough, Northampton, Luton, Leicester, Rochdale and Bradford.

Oldham is the youngest place to see stricter corona virus restrictions after Leicester was overhauled to be the second most affected area in England, with an increase of nearly 200 percent in cases in the past week.

Official NHS statistics show that 128 people were diagnosed with Covid-19 in the Greater Manchester city over the seven days to July 26. This corresponds to a rate of 54.3 cases per 100,000 people.

By comparison, the rate in Leicester – the only place in the UK affected by a local blockage – is 53.2. Blackburn with Darwen is the current hotspot at a rate of 85.9.

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

SCHWEDEN SEHT IN FÄLLEN EINEN "SEHR POSITIVEN" TROPFEN

Schwedens dreitägiger Durchschnitt der Fälle neuer Coronaviren ist in den letzten Wochen allmählich gesunken. Die Zahl der schwerkranken Patienten soll nun „nahe Null“ liegen.

Der dreitägige schwedische Durchschnitt der Fälle neuer Coronaviren ist in den letzten Wochen allmählich gesunken. Die Zahl der schwerkranken Patienten soll nun nahe Null liegen.

Schweden sieht einen "sehr positiven" Abwärtstrend bei Coronavirus-Fällen, nachdem es viel diskutiert hat, nicht in den Lockdown zu gehen, sagt sein Top-Epidemiologe.

Anders Tegnell sagte, die Zahl der schwerkranken Patienten sei "nahe Null", wobei sich die Kurve der neuen Virusfälle ebenfalls nach unten biege.

Tegnell is also continuing to play down the effectiveness of face masks – saying there is 'no point' wearing them on public transport.

Sweden recorded only 1,716 new cases last week, down from 9,094 just a month earlier, and deaths have also been on the decline.

'The curves go down, and the curves over the seriously ill begin to be very close to zero. As a whole, it is very positive,' Tegnell said.

Oldham's council chairmen yesterday urged all of the district's 235,000 residents not to let visitors into their home for at least two weeks to "prevent a strict local ban from being imposed."

It puts Oldham in conflict with the rest of England after the blockade rules were finally relaxed earlier this month so people could stay with loved ones after not being allowed to go to other homes for months.

Anyone living in the Greater Manchester area was asked to be two meters from friends and family when they saw them outside. Current government recommendations for the rest of the nation recommend a one-meter-plus rule – but people should be two meters apart if possible.

It comes after the Royal Bank of Scotland ordered more than 50,000 employees last week to work from home by next year, and was considering the possibility of a second wave in the decision, the Times reported.

The NatWest owner, one of the UK's largest employers, informed employees in a memo that they could work from home by 2021.

The next boss, Simon Wolfson, said: “There is still a lot of uncertainty and our central scenario cannot be trusted with the confidence that our leadership would normally have at this time of year.

"The duration of the rules for social distancing, consumer behavior after the ban, income, unemployment and, above all, the question of whether the second wave will be blocked are not known."

Josh Hardie, deputy director general of the Confederation of British Industry, said last month: “Any plan to return to work must ensure employee safety. Companies have made tremendous efforts to protect their workforce. However, concerns about infections remain high.

“Due to the low demand and the low number of visitors on many main roads, companies are struggling and increasing unemployment. Companies know that returning to the office must not risk a spike in infection. Firms can be knocked down once, not twice. & # 39;

Dozens of companies, including London-based construction company Bouygues UK, have changed their operations in the event of a further increase.

Rob Bradley, its managing director, told Construction News: "We have now prepared to work in a Covid environment when we had not done so in March." Nobody had heard of social distancing; nobody had heard of vacation.

People queue at a walk-in Covid-19 test center that was set up today in the parking lot on Crown Street in Stone

People queue at a walk-in Covid-19 test center that was set up today in the parking lot on Crown Street in Stone

People wearing masks walk past Crown and Anchor in the city of Staffordshire after an increase in coronavirus cases

People wearing masks walk past Crown and Anchor in the city of Staffordshire after an increase in coronavirus cases

TEN PEOPLE GET COVID IN OUTBREAK IN PUB WHERE 200 DRINKERS CRAMMED INTO BEER GARDEN 'LIKE SARDINES'

Ten people have caught coronavirus at a pub in a market town where up to 200 drinkers were filmed crammed into a beer garden 'like sardines'.

Punters and staff who were at the Crown and Anchor in Stone, Staffordshire between July 16 and 18, are now urged to make swabs as well as anyone who has been in close contact with pub visitors.

A new center was established 350 meters away in the parking lot on Crown Street, and people who had been in Stone on one of those evenings and who had been showing symptoms since then, even though they did not go to the pub, should now also get a test.

A customer in the pub, who closed due to overcrowding and tested positive, is also said to have held a private gathering, which has led to further spread. There were 43 new cases in Staffordshire during the week to Sunday.

It comes after local resident Ayrron Robinson filmed a shocking video of people packed into the beer garden earlier this month, saying: 'If we do have to go into local lockdown then the pub has a lot to answer for.'

"We invested a lot in planning the work in a Covid environment, so we were able to put our locations back into operation." (If there is a second wave) I'm glad that we as a company have gone to the right level to protect our people and employees on our websites.

"What I cannot prescribe is when the government says:" We will block the streets, close London or stop public transport. "

"If something like this happens, there is of course nothing I can do about it, but as far as we can control health and safety on our construction sites and in our offices (…) in a second wave, we have probably significantly reduced the risks. & # 39;

A Ryanair spokesman said: “It is impossible to predict how long the Covid 19 pandemic will last, and a second wave of Covid 19 cases across Europe in late autumn is currently our greatest fear.

“Hopefully, by introducing effective track and tracing systems and EU citizens by following recommended face masks, strict hand hygiene and other measures, EU governments will avoid the need for further barriers or restrictions on flights within the EU.

"It is important that European economies begin the recovery process this summer to minimize the damage caused by the Covid 19 pandemic. This recovery can only be triggered by air travel within the EU, which is the engine of growth and growth Economic activity of the EU. "

Ministers were informed today that UK companies need more support because of concerns that a second wave of corona viruses could appear within 14 days.

The gaps for workers in support programs, worker protection and poor corporate behavior during the crisis were highlighted by a Commons committee.

There are concerns about how long it could take for sectors like hospitality and aviation to recover, especially given the fact that a second wave of the pandemic may now be on its way.

In a letter to Secretary of Commerce Alok Sharma, the Westminster Committee on Business, Energy and Industry Strategy identified a number of areas for the government to address.

Labor MP Darren Jones said the government should now rethink its approach to providing sectoral support in the wake of the pandemic.

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