ENTERTAINMENT

Traffic between England and Wales flows freely on the first day of the alleged travel ban


On the first day of the alleged travel ban from areas with high levels of Covid, traffic is still flowing freely across the England-Wales border.

The ban, which went into effect at 6 p.m. on Friday, makes it a criminal offense to travel to Wales from coronavirus hotspots in the UK.

It was described as "unenforceable" by the Federation of Police earlier this week, and there is still no evidence of highly visible patrols or roadblocks that could deter travel from Merseyside – despite Liverpool being in Tier 3.

Those who ignore the restrictions will break the law and face solid charges starting at £ 50. However, to date there have been no reports of drivers being stopped.

On the first day of the alleged travel ban from an area with high Covid (A55 in Broughton in the picture), traffic is still flowing freely across the border from England to Wales.

The ban, which went into effect at 6 p.m. on Friday, makes traveling to Wales from coronavirus hotspots in the UK a criminal offense. Pictured: English Welsh border on the A483 between Chester and Wrexham

The ban, which went into effect at 6 p.m. on Friday, makes traveling to Wales from coronavirus hotspots in the UK a criminal offense. Pictured: English Welsh border on the A483 between Chester and Wrexham

The Welsh government tweeted yesterday which read: “If you live in an area of ​​the UK with high levels of coronavirus from 6pm today, you cannot travel to Wales without a reasonable apology.

& # 39; This includes Level 2 and 3 areas in England, the Central Belt of Scotland and all of Northern Ireland.

"Help us #KeepWalesSafe."

But Welsh traffic cameras today showed the main arteries across the border to Merseyside with free flowing traffic.

The Welsh government posted a tweet (above) yesterday setting out the new restrictions. However, to date there have been no reports of drivers being stopped

The Welsh government posted a tweet (above) yesterday setting out the new restrictions. However, to date there have been no reports of drivers being stopped

When the restrictions came into force, Wales police issued a warning insisting on "robust" enforcement of the travel ban imposed by the Welsh Labor government.

On behalf of the four Welsh Police Forces, Interim Deputy Superintendent Nigel Harrison of the North Wales Police Department said: “While we are at a critical juncture in the virus progression, police across Wales will continue to assist the Welsh Government in limiting the spread of the Virus. & # 39;

He added, “We are now at a time when we will be rigorous in enforcing the rules on obvious violations.

“We will not allow the selfish minority to risk the health of the vast majority who have sacrificed so much in the past few months.

& # 39; We intend to focus our activities on areas and behaviors that pose the greatest risk to our communities.

Welsh traffic cameras today showed the main arteries across the border with free flowing traffic (A494 in picture)

Welsh traffic cameras today showed the main arteries across the border with free flowing traffic (A494 in picture)

It was described as "unenforceable" by the Federation of Police earlier this week, and there is still no evidence of high visibility patrols preventing travel from Merseyside (A55 pictured).

It was described as "unenforceable" by the Federation of Police earlier this week, and there is still no evidence of high visibility patrols preventing travel from Merseyside (A55 pictured).

“We will proactively address those who do not obey the rules of the congregation, whether indoors or outdoors.

“People should not travel between areas where there are local restrictions without defined reasonable excuses.

"This includes those traveling from other parts of the UK at high transfer rates."

Earlier this week, the ban was derided by critics as impractical and anti-English.

The Police Federation of England and Wales said policing in Wales was already overstretched due to the pandemic and the new measures would make policing even more complex.

Mark Bleasdale, Welsh Lead of the Federation of Police of England and Wales, said: “At first glance this is not enforceable as it is difficult to identify where people are from and where they are going.

"There will also be many people lawfully traveling from areas that are not at high risk, and this will only add to the other difficulties officials face in monitoring the existing rules."

There are currently 18 exceptions for crossing the border posted on the Welsh Government website.

It has been confirmed that people from areas with high levels of coronavirus will still be able to travel to Wales for work, education and medical care.

The Wales ban also provides exemptions for those looking for food or medical care, items for house maintenance, moving home, and attending weddings or funerals.

Getting or depositing money with a company, access to care for children or vulnerable adults, doing volunteer or charity work, and training to be a top athlete also allow a person to enter the country.

Comments have been sought from the Welsh Government and North Wales Police.

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