ENTERTAINMENT

Tiny Reed Warbler is struggling to feed a giant cheater who pretends to be his chick


Look, cuckoo came over for dinner! Tiny Reed Warbler is struggling to feed a giant cheater who pretends to be his chick

  • This warbler returned to a very large cuckoo chick and thought it was one of their own offspring
  • The picture was taken by Dr. Michael Ebdy [64] at the Martin Mere Wetland Center in Burscough, Lancashire
  • Cuckoos have a sneaky habit of laying eggs in other species' nests

The reed singer has a number of characteristics, including agility and a distinctive singing voice. Intelligence is clearly not on the list.

Indeed, this turned out to be spectacular when it came back with a delicious bite in its beak.

Faced with not a small warbler but a very large cuckoo chick, she didn't flip her eyelid and dropped food in the gaping beak because she thought it was one of her own offspring.

The warbler returned with a delicious bite in her beak and was confronted with a very large cuckoo chick

The picture was taken by Dr. Michael Ebdy [64] at the Martin Mere Wetland Center in Burscough, Lancashire, who explained the action of the warbler.

"The instinct to feed is provoked by the red mouth of the chick and is so strong that it overrides the obvious fact that this is not a warbler chick!" He said.

The bizarre scene is the result of the cuckoo's sneaky habit of laying eggs in other species' nests and letting the ignorant birds raise their chicks, which then travel to Africa in August.

She didn't flip her eyelid and dropped food in her gaping beak because she thought it was one of her own offspring

She didn't flip her eyelid and dropped food in her gaping beak because she thought it was one of her own offspring

The bizarre scene is the result of the cuckoo's sneaky habit of laying eggs in other species' nests and letting the ignorant birds raise their chicks

The bizarre scene is the result of the cuckoo's sneaky habit of laying eggs in other species' nests and letting the ignorant birds raise their chicks

Dr. Ebdy, a general practitioner who recently retired to help fight the coronavirus, said: “The behavior of the cuckoo is known as breeding parasitism and is remarkable in several ways.

First, the cuckoos lay eggs of different colors to mimic those of the different birds that act as hosts.

Second, the instinct of the parents to feed is provoked by the red mouth of the chick and is so strong that it overrides the obvious fact that this is not a warbler chick!

After all, the parent cuckoos fly back to Africa in July.

“The chicks do this in August after never meeting their parents, but somehow they know where to go. Great. & # 39;

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