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Thousands are protesting against Covids curbs in the capital, including Piers Corbyn


Armed police dispersed a large crowd of anti-lockdown protesters in Trafalgar Square after a march through central London on Saturday that saw thousands gather against coronavirus restrictions.

The protesters called for an end to the "tyranny" of pandemic restrictions and spoke out against vaccines and pedophilia. They were playing Michael Jackson's greatest hits on a PA system as they marched.

At least two people were handcuffed away by officials in Trafalgar Square, and Piers Corbyn, brother of former Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, also took part in the protest, who rejoined protesters after appearing in court over he violated the coronavirus rules.

Protesters refused to wear masks and carried signs calling for an end to the restrictions on personal freedom imposed as part of efforts to control Covid-19.

A banner of a protester on Oxford Street read: "Martial law is coming, do you think it's still about health?" while another depicted a mask with a cross next to the words "love, not fear" and "union, not division".

The anti-lockdown protesters also marched down Northumberland Avenue while large crowds gathered outside Buckingham Palace for the police to act.

The protests came as dramatic evidence of a growing revolt against the restrictions surfaced last night, despite a 17-day full lockdown last week in Wales.

However, Professor Neil Ferguson, whose modeling resulted in the original lockdown in March, warned the UK is facing a winter with further restrictions and said relatives would catch and die of Covid that they were allowed to mix on Christmas Day.

Thousands of people marched through London on Saturday in protest of coronavirus lockdown measures

Protesters refused to wear masks and carried signs calling for an end to the restrictions on personal freedom imposed as part of efforts to control Covid-19

Protesters refused to wear masks and carried signs calling for an end to the restrictions on personal freedom imposed as part of efforts to control Covid-19

A uniformed man salutes during a Unite for Freedom march outside New Scotland Yard in London, England today

A uniformed man salutes during a Unite for Freedom march outside New Scotland Yard in London, England today

A man wearing a U.S. President Donald Trump mask points to police officers as anti-lockdown protesters take part in a march amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in London, UK today

A man wearing a U.S. President Donald Trump mask points to police officers as anti-lockdown protesters take part in a march amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in London, UK today

During Saturday's protests, thousands of protesters marched through the capital's most popular spots, including Trafalgar Square, in front of Buckingham Palace, Oxford Street, Hyde Park and Parliament Square.

Other banners on display included one that read "We all know you are full of s ** t", a second that read "My body, my choice" and a third that read "No to mandatory vaccines". refuse to conform to the new world order. & # 39;

None of the protesters shown in the photos wore face covers to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

A man without a mask was seen outside Buckingham Palace screaming in the face of a police officer who had a face covering.

In Hyde Park, Mr Corbyn, the older brother of the former Labor leader, was pictured posing for a selfie with another protester.

Protesters included Jeremy Corbyn's conspiracy theorist Brother Piers, who rejoined protesters after appearing in court for violating coronavirus rules

Protesters included Jeremy Corbyn's conspiracy theorist Brother Piers, who rejoined protesters after appearing in court for violating coronavirus rules

A man without a mask was seen outside Buckingham Palace screaming in the face of a police officer who had a face covering

A man without a mask was seen outside Buckingham Palace screaming in the face of a police officer who had a face covering

The anti-lockdown protesters also marched down Northumberland Avenue while large crowds gathered outside Buckingham Palace for the police to act

The anti-lockdown protesters also marched down Northumberland Avenue while large crowds gathered outside Buckingham Palace for the police to act

Another banner read "Stop killing the hospitality sector" while a third read "The death toll is increasing ... not from Covid".

Another banner read, "Stop killing the hospitality sector," while a third read, "The death toll is rising … not from Covid".

Another banner carried the message: "No to mandatory vaccines ... refuse to conform to the new world order."

Another banner carried the message: "No to mandatory vaccines … refuse to conform to the new world order."

He was involved in demonstrations for less than 24 hours after joining numerous protesters outside Camden Town tube station on Friday evening.

His appearances came after appearing on Westminster Magistrates' Court for violating coronavirus rules.

The court heard the Metropolitan Police "target" Corbyn in a Hyde Park demonstration on May 30th.

The conspiracy theorist was later fined £ 10,000 for organizing a large anti-lockdown rally in Trafalgar Square in the British capital that was attended by more than 10,000 protesters.

Mr Corbyn appeared before Westminster Magistrates' Court Thursday and said, “Just to give you this in an unrealized place tonight, but if you go on Twitter you will find out.

"We're going to have another drink against the curfew where someone is supposed to be blowing fire."

Corbyn last appeared on October 17 for a "drink against curfew" when he shook hands with night owls, blew up the government, and claimed "there is no coronavirus".

His lawyer told the court on Thursday that Corbyn was selected by the authorities for violating Covid-19 regulations during a lockdown protest because of his political beliefs.

Ben Cooper QC said it was unfair that the conspiracy theorist was arrested on May 30th while a protest against Black Lives Matter on the same day had no arrests for violating lockdown restrictions.

Protesters gathered outside the Houses of Parliament in Parliament Square while others marched near Buckingham Palace

Protesters gathered outside the Houses of Parliament in Parliament Square while others marched near Buckingham Palace

Some anti-lockdown protesters held signs with vaccines in their hands. This woman's sign read "Vaccine Free Zone".

Some anti-lockdown protesters held signs with vaccines in their hands. This woman's sign read "Vaccine Free Zone".

Many people say they will turn down a coronavirus vaccine for fear of side effects, and there is lingering anger over rule violations like Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings

Many people say they will turn down a coronavirus vaccine for fear of side effects, and there is lingering anger over rule violations like Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings

The lawyer, representing the former Labor leader's brother, said: “We see that these are incidents where the police have drawn attention to the protesters’s policies.

“So if we claim that the BLM protest on the same day did not result in arrests despite similar violations, it shows that enforcement is politicized by allowing a group of anti-discrimination protesters to protest against different groups on the same day. This is an example of the police illegally entering the political arena. & # 39;

He added that some police evidence highlighted officers' awareness of Corbyn, which contradicts other evidence suggesting the rapprochement with Corbyn was unplanned.

Regarding a log of police activity called Silver Log, which will serve as evidence for the trial, he added, “The Superintendent in charge of Silver Log showed a specific awareness of Mr. Piers Corbyn – specifically described in the entry as Jeremy Corbyn's brother about his activities – so he was clearly very much on the radar of the officer in charge of overseeing these matters.

"That contradicts later evidence for something which effectively suggests that the confrontation with Mr. Corbyn was surprising."

Southwark's Corbyn has denied two cases of attending a public gathering of more than two people in England during the coronavirus emergency period related to protests on May 16-30.

During Saturday's protests, thousands of demonstrators marched through the capital's most popular spots, including Trafalgar Square, in front of Buckingham Palace, Oxford Street, Hyde Park and Parliament Square

During Saturday's protests, thousands of protesters marched through the capital's most popular spots, including Trafalgar Square, in front of Buckingham Palace, Oxford Street, Hyde Park and Parliament Square

A protester brandished a model of a coronavirus test swab as it mingled with other protesters in Trafalgar Square

A protester carried a mockup of a coronavirus test swab as he mingled with other protesters in Trafalgar Square

On Friday, the focus group's results indicated that the UK public is of the opinion that the coronavirus rules are not working, that they break the law if necessary to see loved ones, and that it is time to see the UK again to do normal.

The Daily Mail listened to one of the focus groups typical of several recent ones and reiterated the views of MPs.

It was held last Friday and covers a cross-section of society, both Tory and Labor, in London, Birmingham and Liverpool. It seems to show that voters have lost confidence in bans and are no longer willing to obey all the rules.

They also think that the second wave of the virus will be less dangerous, are increasingly concerned about the damage to jobs and the economy.

Other banners on display included one that read, “Quarantine is that sick people are locked up. Tyranny is health people who are lucky & # 39; accompanied by an image of hands in handcuffs

Other banners on display included one that read “Quarantine is that sick people are locked up. Tyranny is health people who are lucky & # 39; accompanied by a picture of hands in handcuffs

Another sign read: "When tyranny becomes law, resistance becomes duty" (picture)

Another sign read: "When tyranny becomes law, resistance becomes duty" (picture)

Pictured: A man wearing a U.S. President Donald Trump, holding an elbow with a beer mask in hand, nudges a police officer as anti-lockdown protesters take part in a march in Parliament Square

Pictured: A man wearing a U.S. President Donald Trump, holding an elbow with a beer mask in hand, nudges a police officer as anti-lockdown protesters take part in a march in Parliament Square

In the meantime, many will turn down a coronavirus vaccine for fear of side effects, and there is lingering anger over rule violations like Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings.

JL Partners' James Johnson, who moderated the focus group, said the results were the same as in similar studies he had conducted.

He said the results convinced him that opinion would turn against bans.

He said that "nuanced conversations" held in focus groups involving only a handful of people have uncovered "hidden truths" about the pandemic and attitudes towards the government's lockdown strategy.

None of the protesters wore face covers and many defied the rules of social distancing as they gathered in the capital

None of the protesters wore face covers and many defied the rules of social distancing as they gathered in the capital

Another ban carried the slogan "Remember, Remember, November 5th (Embers)". Another protester held a placard that read "This is tyranny now".

Another ban carried the slogan "Remember, Remember, November 5th (Embers)". Another protester held a placard that read "This is tyranny now".

Protesters rallied after Tier 2 lockdown restrictions were imposed in the capital earlier this month

Protesters gathered after the introduction of level 2 lockdown restrictions in the capital earlier this month

The protesters also marched down the Victoria Embankment. A woman held a banner that read "Covid is a scam".

The protesters also marched down the Victoria Embankment. A woman held a banner that read "Covid is a scam".

However, on Saturday, Professor Ferguson said schools may have to be closed to older students if restrictions on household mixing fail to stem the surge in infections and that it will be a "political judgment" on whether the regulations are in place while of the festival season.

Speaking to today's broadcast on BBC Radio 4, he said: “There is a risk of transmission and there will be consequences. Some people will die of infection that day.

“But if it's only a day or two, the effects are likely to be limited. So this is really a political judgment about costs versus benefits. & # 39;

It follows the prospect of a family Christmas, which was further confused yesterday when Downing Street insisted that relatives gather – but a minister warned that this would not be "normal".

Professor Ferguson added, “That (ban on shuffling households) should have a significant effect, but so far we have not definitely been able to see it.

“If we go beyond that, there is a limit to what we can do to reduce contacts without, for example, reaching the older years in schools and sixth grade colleges, where we know older teenagers can convey as adults .

“Of course, nobody wants to switch even partially to virtual education and close schools. The challenge could be that otherwise we will not be able to get the gears under control. & # 39;

"Let's get back to normal!": Thoughts and feelings of an angry audience

Q: What do you think of the government's coronavirus rules?

Alec, 61, consultant, London, Conservative

They are confusing, unenforceable, and ignored by people.

Brian, 68, retired, Liverpool, Conservative

A focus group member said the government's special adviser Dominic Cummings, pictured at right, was "gross" for breaking the rules

A focus group member said the government's special adviser Dominic Cummings, pictured at right, was "gross" for breaking the rules

It kills more people with cancer. Coronavirus is 40th on the list (of causes of death). People with heart problems and strokes all die. We're saving people with coronavirus, but the rest die from diseases we can control.

Amira, (female) 30, school administrator, London, laboratory

They do not match the statistics.

Paul, 48, developer, Birmingham, Conservative

They are patronizing and unjust.

Daniel, 24, student, London, Conservative

Confusing; People in government wouldn't stick to them.

Q: Do rules work?

Paul

No. The virus has no time, racial or gender limit. (Authorities) believe it will go away at ten o'clock when the pubs close, but it just spreads out among the crowds that are wasted on the streets.

Brian

You can hold it down for a while, but it will keep breaking out.

Steph, 38, charity worker, Liverpool, Labor

We have (already) tried to lock, we need to get back to normal. How will a second lock be different?

Q: Are you going to follow new rules?

Amira

No, I am very close to my family. I haven't seen her in six months, I'm not going to do it again.

Brian

We all initially followed the rules because we correctly thought we had to get rid of this virus. We went through all the pain of lockdown, now they want us to face another. The consensus is that they (the public) know it won't work, it will always break down.

Howard, 23, engineer, Liverpool

When you need to see your loved ones, see them. If that's why you stop by – don't do it.

Angela, 59, Birmingham, work

I wear a mask when I go out, but I'll see my family anyway because my parents are older. I had a few months not to see her … and I'm not going to do that again. Everything else I will act normally because I could not go through it mentally again.

Daniel

I would break it (lockdown) to see my family – for my sanity.

Paul

Not really. When you need to see your loved ones, see them.

Q: What should MINISTERS do instead?

Angela

Go ahead and be sensible, don't mingle with large crowds. Get back to normal as much as possible.

Daniel

There should be a suspension with very harsh penalties … for a short time. Then we could remove the virus and live as we want.

Q: Why did trust in the rules break down?

Paul

If the queen doesn't wear a mask, why should I bother?

Steph

Dominic Cummings & # 39; (behavior) was disgusting, Matt Hancock put his arm around other MPs in the lower house.

Paul

You have Cummings on a jolly, the woman (MP) who went from Scotland to London and back with the virus and is not being prosecuted. It's a cop. And they want to punish us!

Brian

According to the mail, the average age of a dying Covid person is 82 years and the average life expectancy is 81 years. So who are we protecting? There is a good chance that I would survive at age 68.

Q: Do you have a Covid vaccine?

Angela

I don't believe in vaccines, wouldn't have any.

Paul

What if they put out one that hasn't been tested, and in five years we'll all have side effects? We're all going to sue the government for being forced to have it.

Alec

I'm going to take it because it's going to be a worldwide vaccine.

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