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The Washington Sq Park memorial has been blurred as the NYPD faces a $ 1 billion budget cut


New York's famous George Washington Monument was blurred with red paint on Monday as protesters rallied downtown in front of City Hall before a controversial vote took place, pushing the city's police budget by $ 1 billion – 16 percent despite escalating crime and chaos of their total amount – could lower.

As the latest symbol of police defiance and vagueness across the city, the vandals threw red paint on the famous memorial on Monday and then fled the scene.

President Trump tweeted on Tuesday: "We are tracking down the two anarchists who painted the magnificent George Washington statue in Manhattan. We have them on tape. They are prosecuted and have to spend 10 years in prison based on the Law on Monuments and Statues. Give up now! & # 39;

In the town hall, demonstrators who had set up a camp in the Occupy City Hall clashed with the police on Tuesday morning. Demonstrators have been there for a week now and refuse to leave until the NYPD budget is cut by at least $ 1 billion – something that is expected to happen on Tuesday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has an agreement with the city council that will separate $ 1 billion from the NYPD and cancel the hiring of 1,163 police officers.

Some Democrats say this is a step in the right direction and that the police, like others across the country, must be robbed of their powers and resources to combat systemic racism and excessive use of violence.

However, others say it's not enough for the mammoth force, which has an annual budget of $ 6 billion. They want more money to be taken away and say that much of De Blasio's plan is "gimmicks". For example, school security officers receive the same amount of money, but are no longer considered part of the police budget. Instead, they are transferred to the Ministry of Education.

However, others – notably the NYPD commissioner and the Police Benevolent Association – say that the need for a strong and reinforced police force is greater than ever in the face of tensions in the city and country after George Floyd's death.

Combined with de Blasio's mild bail reform that puts more criminals on the streets than before, and a judicial system that has been behind for months because of the COVID 19 pandemic, they say crime is inevitably increasing and the budget is not being cut absolutely the right move.

There are also persistent complaints that the NYPD is not acting against low-level crimes, such as people who violate social distance rules while eating outdoors, drinking on the street, or being generally anti-social.

Blurred: A statue of George Washington is covered in red paint after being destroyed in Washington Square Park in the early morning of Monday. America's first president had more than 100 slaves, making him the target of recent protests against racism

Objective: On the arch in Washington Square Park are two statues of the first president of the nation upon which vandals threw balloons in the early morning

Objective: On the arch in Washington Square Park are two statues of the first president of the nation upon which vandals threw balloons in the early morning

Cleaning up: A member of the New York City Monuments and Conservation Department washes the Washington statue yesterday after it was destroyed

Cleaning up: A member of the New York City Monuments and Conservation Department washes the Washington statue yesterday after it was destroyed

The town hall was destroyed with graffiti, which exonerated the police authorities on Monday morning

The town hall was destroyed with graffiti, which exonerated the police authorities on Monday morning

8474921 Protesters clash with police officers who will deprive the NYPD of $ 1 billion before voting on the New York budget - police unions say de Blasio "surrendered to lawlessness"

8474921 Protesters clash with police officers who will deprive the NYPD of $ 1 billion before voting on the New York budget – police unions say de Blasio "surrendered to lawlessness"

On Tuesday morning, officials clashed with demonstrators outside the town hall as they tried to protect a barricade

On Tuesday morning, officials clashed with demonstrators outside the town hall as they tried to protect a barricade

In Brooklyn, residents were terrorized for nights by firing illegal fireworks through the night, apparently without police intervention. The city's income was burdened by $ 9 billion when businesses closed at the beginning of the pandemic and many are now closed.

The city's income was burdened by $ 9 billion when businesses closed at the beginning of the pandemic and many are now closed.

Traffic in the city is expected to return to normal in November. Restaurant and retail traffic in New York City is currently 43.6 percent of normal traffic in 2019, while national traffic is 53.2 percent of normal traffic. Pedestrian traffic in New York City increased by around 18.3 percent from late May to late June, compared to the national increase of 27.7 percent, according to Zenreach.

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea said Tuesday that he understood that every department had to face cuts, but that the decision was also heavily influenced by the Black Lives Matter movement and that it was "punitive".

He insisted that his officers would not allow mob rule

“We have to make all cuts, we understand that if you look at the financial crisis with COVID.

“As far as I'm concerned, cuts that need to be made because of difficult fiscal decisions are cuts that might seem punishable. We'll check all the numbers … it's worrying. I think it will affect our ability to protect New Yorkers in some way.

NYPD COMMISSIONER SAYS CUTS ARE "PUNITIVE"

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea said Tuesday that he understood that every department had to face cuts, but that the decision was also heavily influenced by the Black Lives Matter movement and that it was "punitive".

He insisted that his officers would not allow mob rule

“We have to make all cuts, we understand that if you look at the financial crisis with COVID.

“As far as I'm concerned, cuts that need to be made because of difficult fiscal decisions are cuts that might seem punishable. We'll check all the numbers … it's worrying. I think it will affect our ability to protect New Yorkers in some way. But we are also managers and it is my job to make optimal use of the available resources.

“I don't think anyone who listens thinks that this is the climate right now that doesn't affect what's going on with the budget. I think that goes without saying. It is my job to ensure that this is not the case, but we also need to take a look at what is going on. Reducing the number of employees in times of increasing crime will be an extreme challenge for the men and women in this department, ”he said.

Commissioner Shea went on to say that cutting the budget would do the most harm to the color communities, as it is the area with the most violence.

“It will affect our patrol strength and training, and it will likely affect colored people more than anyone else. We know where the violence takes place in this city. & # 39;

"My job is to make sure we are as efficient as possible. We do everything we can to keep New Yorkers safe. We have to be creative," he said.

Over the past week, crime has increased significantly across the city.

Shea said it was due to a combination of bail reform and a backward judicial system.

He asked why the COVID courts were still not operating when thousands were encouraged to peacefully protest the police.

“But we are also managers and it is my job to make optimal use of the available resources.

“I don't think anyone who listens thinks that this is the climate right now that doesn't affect what's going on with the budget. I think that goes without saying.

"It is my job to ensure that this is not the case, but we also need to take a look at what is going on. Reducing the number of employees in times of increasing crime will be an extreme challenge for the men and women in this department . " he said.

Commissioner Shea went on to say that cutting the budget would do the most harm to the color communities, as it is the area with the most violence.

“It will affect our patrol strength and training, and it will likely affect colored people more than anyone else. We know where the violence takes place in this city. & # 39;

"My job is to make sure we are as efficient as possible. We do everything we can to keep New Yorkers safe. We have to be creative," he said.

Over the past week, crime has increased significantly across the city.

Shea said it was due to a combination of bail reform and a backward judicial system.

He asked why the COVID courts were still not operating when thousands were encouraged to peacefully protest the police.

Patrick J. Lynch, President of the PBA, said: “Mayor de Basio's message to the New Yorkers was clear today: you will have fewer police officers on your streets.

& # 39; The shootings more than doubled again last week.

“Even at the moment, the NYPD doesn't have enough staff to move out of a quarter without making another quarter less safe.

"We will say it again: the mayor and the city council handed the city over to lawlessness. Things will not improve until the New Yorkers hold them accountable. & # 39;

De Blasio said his new budget was the "toughest" in his six-year tenure at City Hall. Sales of $ 9 billion had "evaporated" during the virus pandemic.

The mayor said the NYPD cuts would "shift resources to young people and communities to address many of the underlying issues."

"I am pleased to say that we have a plan to achieve real reforms and redistributions while ensuring that our city is safe and that our officials are patrolling where we need them in this city," said De Blasio at a press conference.

"This is something that I think is so important for the future in order to find the right balance, reforms, justice, redistribution, but always security."

De Blasio did not give details of the cuts, but indicated changes to school security programs.

In addition to the $ 1 billion reduction in operating costs, the NYPD's capital budget will be cut by more than $ 500 million, with the money instead being used to build youth recreation centers and public housing estates, de Blasio added.

New York City Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio (pictured) unveiled plans to cut the $ 6 billion budget for the NYPD at a press conference on Monday afternoon in City Hall

New York City Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio (pictured) unveiled plans to cut the $ 6 billion budget for the NYPD at a press conference on Monday afternoon in City Hall

The NYPD has approximately 36,000 officers.

When asked whether this number would apply, de Blasio replied: "Whatever we do in terms of the number of employees, the city must protect it."

The city has to lay off up to 22,000 workers from October until a rescue operation or a federal borrowing agency.

The mayor said the city was not optimistic about receiving additional incentives from the federal government before the end of July.

"The NYPD did a damn good job saying, okay, here are some things we can do while we still keep the city safe," said de Blasio.

& # 39; It is a moment when we have to tackle profound problems. We need to redistribute the revenue to the communities most in need. & # 39;

Hundreds of protesters camped in City Hall Park last week to demand cuts in police funding.

The organizers called it "Occupy City Hall", a reference to the Occupy Wall Street movement of 2011, a few blocks away in Zuccotti Park.

A huge crowd of demonstrators outside the town hall on Wednesday morning. Some have been there for days as part of a # OccupyCityHall protest

A huge crowd of demonstrators outside the town hall on Wednesday morning. Some have been there for days as part of a # OccupyCityHall protest

Protesters outside the City Hall in Manhattan called for police relief on Tuesday

Protesters outside the City Hall in Manhattan called for police relief on Tuesday

Demonstrators meditate on Tuesday morning before voting in the City Council on the site of the Occupy City Hall

Demonstrators meditate on Tuesday morning before voting in the City Council on the site of the Occupy City Hall

Brooklyn Bridge City Hall subway station is now covered with protest signs demanding the abolition of the NYPD

Brooklyn Bridge City Hall subway station is now covered with protest signs demanding the abolition of the NYPD

People in NYC & # 39; Abolition Park & ​​# 39; in front of the town hall on Tuesday

People in NYC & # 39; Abolition Park & ​​# 39; in front of the town hall on Tuesday

Protesters shelter under tents and umbrellas yesterday during their protest in New York City, where protesters are demanding cuts in police funding

Protesters shelter under tents and umbrellas yesterday during their protest in New York City, where protesters are demanding cuts in police funding

In an echo of the continuing "occupation" in Seattle, the demonstrators declared an "autonomous zone" and a "no-cop zone"

In an echo of the continuing "occupation" in Seattle, the demonstrators declared an "autonomous zone" and a "no-cop zone"

A group of demonstrators set out for the "autonomous zone" of the Occupy City Hall in New York City last night

A group of demonstrators set out for the "autonomous zone" of the Occupy City Hall in New York City last night

Protesters seek protection during the Occupy City Hall protest, in which protesters have called the park "Abolition Park".

Protesters seek protection during the Occupy City Hall protest, in which protesters have called the park "Abolition Park".

The group made its demands – on colorful posters, a graffiti canvas, and a massive poster scribbled over a subway entrance – to de Blasio and Council spokesman Corey Johnson.

"We have gone through various levels of escalation to ensure that we get their attention," said Jonathan Lykes, one of the movement's organizers. "If they disappoint the police by $ 1 billion, we'll win – but that's just what we're asking this week."

At the protest, a provisional "People's Library", assembled under a tent, promotes "radical literature", while a nearby "bodega" offers free donated food and protective equipment for demonstrators.

Speakers announced release training and reaffirmed the expectation that space residents would take care of each other.

"We want racial injustice to stop, and the means is that we can stay here in this room now," said Manny, who turned to the crowd but refused to give his last name.

"It is very clear that people want to stay after Tuesday and that people want to see the police and prison abolished."

Gatherings of more than 10 people are still banned in New York City because of the corona virus, but demonstrators have been ignoring these rules for weeks and the police have made no effort to enforce them.

Lykes said the crew made the NYPD "nervous" and recalled a series of minor confrontations that were resolved without arrest. He distinguished the peaceful gathering in Lower Manhattan from a week-long occupation in Seattle, which had seen episodes of violence.

"We have an uprising and one of the largest we have seen since Martin Luther King's death," he said. "These are the worst times, but the best times for the opportunity to change."

The idea of ​​cutting the NYPD's budget, which is now around $ 6 billion in operations annually, seemed politically ridiculous a year ago, given the memories of September 11 and the criminal decades of the 1970s, 1980s, and early 1990s Years were still fresh.

But now the city authorities are fully concerned with the possibility of huge cuts due to a huge loss of revenue from coronavirus.

Patrick Lynch, head of the Police Benevolent Association, said the proposed cuts would reduce the number of police officers on the streets as the shootings increased.

"We will say it again: the mayor and the city council handed the city over to lawlessness. Things won't improve until the New Yorkers hold them accountable, ”he said.

Last weekend alone, up to eleven people were shot in Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens and Manhattan in less than 12 hours on Saturday evening and Sunday morning. Murder in the city has also increased 25 percent compared to that time last year.

The Occupy City Hall protest shows a number of slogans, including more than one request to "defuse" the NYPD.

The Occupy City Hall protest shows a number of slogans, including more than one request to "defuse" the NYPD.

A protester holds a sign demanding that police officers "stop killing black people" and that the authorities "fire the police".

A protester holds a sign demanding that police officers "stop killing black people" and that the authorities "fire the police".

Demonstrators display a number of slogans, including Black Lives Matter and "Abolishing the Police" in protest against the Occupy City Hall

Demonstrators display a number of slogans, including Black Lives Matter and "Abolishing the Police" in protest against the Occupy City Hall

Earlier this week, several officials warned that drastic cuts by the NYPD would set the city back 30 years in its crime-fighting efforts (pictured a graffiti-covered subway car in the 1980s).

Earlier this week, several officials warned that drastic cuts by the NYPD would set the city back 30 years in its crime-fighting efforts (pictured a graffiti-covered subway car in the 1980s).

Earlier this week, several officials warned that drastic cuts by the NYPD would set the city back in its crime-fighting efforts for 30 years – which would jeopardize public safety, a negative impact that "could be felt in every neighborhood in the city," a law enforcement agency told the Daily News.

"A $ 1 billion cut in the NYPD's operating budget would throw the city back three decades, significantly impacting the NYPD's significant progress in securing crime at historic lows and New Yorkers' security."

This view is shared by Bruce Backman, a New York-based research consultant and member of the re-open New York coalition, who told DailyMail.com that the city is balancing on the abyss of the catastrophe – and just like Detroit two years away & # 39 ;.

"The city of New York has never been as bad as it has been in the past three months and it's getting worse by the day," said Backman. "It's not just corona virus, its riots, looting, murders, fireworks and break-ins."

"Once they know New York is on the run, this will lead to more crimes," Backman continued. “Go to one of New York's poorer neighborhoods and ask those who live there if they want less street law enforcement.

"I'm pretty sure the answer is not what the mayor thinks," he said. "This is not the time to cut funding, it is bad public order."

Felix Atlasman, owner of American Home Hardware and More, repeated Backman's views in an interview with DailyMail.com on Monday.

Atlasman explained how his neighborhood has been hit by a dangerous crime in Hell & # 39; s Kitchen in the past few weeks.

At the suggestion that New York City could go back to the criminal days of the 1980s, Atlasman insisted that we were back.

"In the past, my best-selling product was light bulbs, now it's pepper spray," said Atlasman, who opened the hardware store in 1955.

"When I call the police, they come two hours later and ask me which way (the shoplifter) has gone."

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