ENTERTAINMENT

The UK records 341 new hospital deaths from Covid – 121 fewer than last Saturday


The UK has recorded 341 deaths from coronavirus – a 26 percent decrease from 462 deaths last week as the number of cases fell dramatically from 26,860 last Saturday to 19,875 today.

According to today's figures, around 1,682 people with coronavirus were hospitalized as it was proposed to halve the quarantine times for contacts of Covid-19 cases to just one week or to eliminate them completely as part of a pilot test.

The numbers represent a decrease from yesterday's data, which showed a daily increase in cases of 20,252 cases and 511 deaths.

Rapid tests that can produce results in as little as 15 minutes will be handed over to rescue workers in Liverpool next week to ensure the rest of their team doesn't have to self-isolate if you test positive.

In today's numbers, patients who died of coronavirus in England were between 28 and 102 years old. With the exception of five patients between the ages of 64 and 96 years, all had known the underlying health conditions, and the deaths occurred between June 3 and November 20.

Rapid tests will be carried out on contacts of people infected with the virus who have been stuck at home for more than seven days, with those who get negative results being released from quarantine.

If the mass test pilot proves successful, it could be rolled out across the UK. However, this is not expected to give the green light until next year at the earliest.

In other coronavirus news:

  • The data from the Office of National Statistics showed that daily infections fell from 47,700 to 38,900 between November 8 and 14, an 18 percent decrease.
  • Northern Ireland announced that there would be a second lockdown as hair salons and cafes would have to close for another two weeks.
  • Rishi Sunak faces a battle with the unions when they describe his wage pressure on five million public sector workers, other than nurses and doctors, as a "cruel body blow".
  • Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the government should test everyone for coronavirus once a month and offer "freedom passes" to those who test negative.
  • According to an Oxford study, people with Covid-19 antibodies are protected from re-infection for at least six months.

Rescue workers and contacts from Covid-19 cases who have been isolated for more than seven days will be offered the cross-flow tests. It's the next stage of the mass testing pilot (Image: A woman is wiped down in Liverpool)

Rescue workers and contacts from Covid-19 cases who have been isolated for more than seven days will be offered the cross-flow tests. It's the next stage of the mass testing pilot (Image: A woman is wiped down in Liverpool)

The data from the Office of National Statistics showed that daily infections fell from 47,700 to 38,900 between November 8 and 14, an 18 percent decrease

The data from the Office of National Statistics showed that daily infections fell from 47,700 to 38,900 between November 8 and 14, an 18 percent decrease

The Scottish government announced 37 more coronavirus deaths in the past 24 hours as level 4 restrictions were put in place in 11 local authorities.

Positive cases also increased by 887, increasing the positivity rate to 5.9 percent.

A total of 3,496 people have died after testing positive for the virus in the past 28 days, while Scotland has reported 87,517 positive cases since the pandemic began.

Another 10 people with Covid-19 have died in Northern Ireland. The Ministry of Health also confirmed on Saturday that an additional 357 cases of the virus had been recorded within the last 24-hour reporting period.

Meanwhile, an additional 316 people who tested positive for coronavirus have died in hospital in England, bringing the total confirmed deaths reported in hospitals to 38,112, NHS England said on Saturday.

As experts said today, reducing or removing quarantine periods would "cripple" society and parts of the economy at a critical point in the pandemic.

Boris Johnson has urged self-isolating Britons to keep their distance with friends and family until their two weeks are up. In a video filmed today at his apartment on number 11, the prime minister tried to raise morale by saying that isolating them would "break the chain of transmission".

Public health chiefs have warned that lockdown restrictions could be extended into the New Year – instead of ending on December 2nd – to ensure the NHS survives the "hump of winter".

NHS Providers executive director Chris Hopson said yesterday that he believes tier three measures should become the benchmark across England to prevent "re-limiting" infections.

The toughest measures under the tiered system are allowing restaurants, shops, and in some cases gyms, to reopen the shutters but order people not to visit the homes of friends and family. This is far less restrictive than a national lockdown.

Ministers also reportedly plan to relax restrictions over Christmas – December 22-28 – to allow multiple families to reunite under one roof for up to a week after months of separation.

According to SAGE, the “R” reproductive rate - the average number of people to whom each Covid-19 patient passes the disease on - fell slightly from a maximum of 1.2 in the last week to a maximum of 1.1

According to SAGE, the “R” reproductive rate – the average number of people to whom each Covid-19 patient passes the disease on – fell slightly from a maximum of 1.2 in the last week to a maximum of 1.1

FURTHER COVID-19 RESTRICTIONS IN THE NEW YEAR WARNING THE NHS PROVIDER REPRESENTATIVE

The assistant manager of NHS Providers has announced that lockdown restrictions will apply in the new year to get us through the "hump" of winter.

Saffron Cordery told BBC Breakfast that the NHS workforce is "incredibly tired" now as they treat coronavirus patients and try to keep regular services open.

She added that the top priority for hospital bosses is to take care of their staff so they can care for patients effectively, adding that they know exactly how tired their staff are.

"There is this great hope (for a vaccine) among staff and the public and that feeling of 'oh we can take our foot off the house now,'" she said.

"But actually we can't, we just have to hold out for a while until all the elements are in place."

Ms. Cordery said she expected the restrictions to remain in place into the New Year to ensure we weather the "hump of winter-hits-coronavirus."

The mass testing program must be approved by Chris Whitty, England's Chief Medical Officer, before it can be rolled out nationwide.

Professor Calum Semple, a member of SAGE at the University of Liverpool, told The Times that the plans would release key employees from quarantine. "If we do cross-flow tests on a daily basis, we can avoid quarantine completely," he said.

"If you take a fire truck with six people and the driver is Covid-positive, five people sitting behind him must be quarantined for 14 days. That's a pretty rough, arbitrary 14 days.

“So we can take the other five people and give them a new driver and give the rest of them several packs of side-depth tests that they can use every morning before the shift. And we can keep the fire truck on the road. & # 39;

The arbitrary two-week quarantine period is designed to prevent people who have been exposed to the virus and could therefore become infected from spreading further.

This should prevent infections from increasing in the UK and preventing the virus from reaching the most vulnerable people who could then be hospitalized with the disease and sadly die.

The period was recommended initially because anyone infected with the virus can take up to two weeks to show symptoms.

However, many studies have shown that most people who are infected get the first warning signs – temperature, cough, and loss of taste and smell – up to five days after the virus appears.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson today in a video update of # 10 urged people who self-isolate to socially distance themselves from those they live with

Prime Minister Boris Johnson today in a video update of # 10 urged people who self-isolate to socially distance themselves from those they live with

It comes after repeated warnings that most people who Test and Trace ask to self-isolate may not be following the rules.

The prime minister – hiding at # 11 – reached out today to those who have been quarantined for two weeks after being exposed to the virus.

"The NHS Test and Trace, which is getting better, did what so many of my political enemies had wanted for many years and put me under house arrest," he joked.

“I know how frustrating it can be, so I just wanted to tell everyone else in my shoes. Don't forget that, of course, isolation doesn't necessarily apply to the people you share your home with – your partners can still go shopping or whatever.

“Your roommates can still exercise, but you need to make sure you continue to observe social distancing from them.

“Our kids can still go to school, of course, but you need to make sure you observe social distance from them and follow the basics: hands, face, space.

“And remember, what you do is incredibly important because that is how we will break the chain of transmission, stop the disease, lower the R – as I believe we are doing right now – and get under control.

"Thank you everyone for what you are doing. If it is a burden and you feel mental pressure from what is going on, go online and check out Every Mind Matters."

There were also growing concerns about Test and Trace's ability to stop the virus from spreading in the UK. Many experts warned that not enough Covid-19 contacts could be reached quickly, which means many in the community were still floating around without knowing they could spread the virus.

The latest figures from the Ministry of Health on the system's performance, released Thursday, showed that it was failed to hit a record number of Covid-19 cases after things seemed to get a little better last week.

In the seven-day period ending November 11, 21,419 positive cases were missed, the largest number since its launch in the UK.

Of the 156,853 Covid-19 cases transmitted to the system, 84.9 percent – or 133,195 – were reached and asked to self-isolate. This is slightly below the previous week when 85.6 percent of all Covid-19 cases – or 121,407 – were hit.

It comes after increasing concerns about the performance of Test and Trace. A record number of positive cases has not been reached in the last week for which data are available

It comes after increasing concerns about the performance of Test and Trace. A record number of positive cases has not been reached in the last week for which data are available

FOREIGN TRAVEL QUARANTINE THAT MUST BE SEPARATED IN FIVE DAYS

Travel quarantine will be reduced to just five days next week to allow the UK to fly again.

Ministers have approved a plan to change the 14-day isolation rule that has crippled the aviation and travel sectors.

As part of a testing and approval system launched next month, travelers must be quarantined for five days prior to testing.

If the result is negative, they are immediately released from isolation. Fast turnaround tests are used that produce results within an hour. The cruise industry is also set to restart gradually by February.

A Whitehall source said last night: “We are very keen to get people flying again when it is safe to do so, and the Prime Minister is particularly concerned about the impact we have seen on business travel.

"Cutting the quarantine period from 14 days to five days can make a big difference."

The move is a huge win for the Daily Mail's Get Britain Flying campaign, which was launched in September to prevent the collapse of the aviation and travel sectors.

The government's Global Travel Taskforce, which launched last month, is believed to have recommended a seven-day quarantine period. Travelers returning from Covid hotspots were tested after five days and released two days later.

NHS Providers deputy general manager Saffron Cordery warned today that England's lockdown could remain in place until the new year as hospital transfers have not yet declined.

She said at the BBC breakfast that a decline in infection rates has not yet led to falling hospital admissions.

"There is a delay in reducing the prevalence in the community and, indeed, a reduction in hospital admissions because if someone were to contract coronavirus it would likely take 10 days to two weeks to be hospitalized," she said.

"I think it would be really tempting to say, 'OK, this lockdown is working, let's lift all restrictions on December 2nd and go back to where we were," but I think that might help us control the spread of the Leading Virus to Dangerous Conditions and What It Means for the NHS. & # 39;

She also said it was important to consider the pressures the NHS is under before loosening lockdown restrictions.

Ms. Cordery told BBC Breakfast that healthcare has already seen an increase in 12-hour A&E waiting times and admissions, slow ambulance handover times and long waiting times for people to be transferred from the hospital.

She said the lockdown was "absolutely critical" at the moment, as it is currently the only way to control the spread of the virus.

Ms. Cordery said the NHS is looking for the "holy trinity" of a vaccine, more effective therapies to treat existing Covid-19 patients, and rapid turnaround testing for the public and NHS staff.

"We're trying to bring the R-rate down to the point where fewer hospitalizations are required," she said.

Matt Hancock confirmed yesterday that coronavirus vaccine rollouts will begin next month if one is approved by the UK Medicines Agency.

The Minister of Health said in a TV briefing that the government had formally asked the regulator MHRA to consider licensing the vaccine from pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and BioNTech.

A late study this week confirmed that the sting was 95 percent effective in clinical trials and appears to protect people of all ages from coronavirus.

The £ 15-per-dose push is currently the favorite, first approved by the MHRA, although candidates from Moderna and Oxford University are close behind.

According to SAGE, the R-rate of the virus, which is how many people each infected person gives the virus, has decreased for a second straight week and could be 1.0 or lower in any region of the UK. The estimate for the whole country is between 1.0 and 1.1, the lowest value since the beginning of September before the start of the second wave.

But even though the second coronavirus peak has "flattened out" the public must "keep our resolve" for the remainder of the lockdown to prevent rebounding, Matt Hancock told the Downing Street press conference.

He said it was too early to say which contacts will be able over Christmas and what additional restrictions may be needed after the lockdown is relaxed.

Speaking to Mr Hancock at a press conference on Downing Street, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, also cautioned caution, suggesting that any profits from the second national lockdown could be quickly lost as the virus “only took seconds “Needed spread.

Professor Van-Tam confirmed that the UK is "waiting" for the guard dog to approve the vaccine and said it would "be done at the speed of science".

Leaked NHS plans found that even those in the lowest risk group – healthy adults under the age of 55 – can potentially start vaccinating in just two months, if everything goes according to plan.

The files say any deadlines set for vaccines depend on the arrival of supplies – with up to seven million doses expected in the next month – and are based on NHS proposals to create huge GP facilities to dispense the shots.

Mr. Hancock said, “I can confirm that the government has formally asked the MHRA to evaluate the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine for suitability.

"Of course, once a vaccine is approved, it is available across the UK from our NHS and is free at the time of delivery, unless solvency is required."

The announcement follows news that Pfizer had asked the US regulator – the FDA – to do the same there.

A report was released earlier this week confirming that the required safety data has been fully recorded and that tests have shown the vaccine can protect up to 95 percent of people from Covid-19.

LARGEST FLU JAB DRIVE TO COINCID WITH COVID VACCINATIONS

The UK is getting the biggest flu shot in history this year.

Health chiefs plan to vaccinate a record 30 million Britons against the flu this year so that hospitals can focus primarily on Covid-19 patients.

To achieve this, the flu vaccination is being offered to those over 50 for the first time in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In Scotland it is given to those over 55 years of age.

Physios, paramedics, medical students and retired NHS workers have all been trained to deliver the shocks for the mammoth surgery.

Normally in the UK only doctors, pharmacists and some nurses are allowed to give vaccines.

But the NHS has to try juggling two mass vaccination programs at once this year – for both Covid and flu – so it needs all hands on deck.

There were already some logistical problems trying to roll out the huge flu vaccination program, with the pharmacist Boots already having to limit inventory for the most vulnerable.

The introduction of a Covid-19 vaccine this winter could add even more stress to the supply chain.

Last winter, 25 million people were offered the flu shot, and officials expanded the annual vaccination program to all sixth grade children for the first time.

All over 65s, pregnant women, NHS workers and people with serious long-term illnesses such as heart disease and Parkinson's are also eligible for the free prick.

Figures show that there are around 10 million people between the ages of 50 and 65 in the UK, which means the vaccination program had to be increased by 40 percent to catch everyone.

The flu vaccinations are given in general practices, pharmacies and hospitals, where vaccines are usually dispensed.

NHS bosses, on the other hand, had to get creative about where to hand out covid bursts because the demand will be so great. Health chiefs plan to set up a number of much larger venues for injecting vaccines for the new disease, including empty NHS Nightingale hospitals and sports centers, including the Derby Arena.

Although Pfizer is currently at the top of the queue, it may not get approved or the later process may take longer to complete. However, officials are expected to give the green light to at least one guy this year.

The UK has ordered 40 million doses of Pfizer's vaccine – the first batch is expected to arrive next month – and five million modernas – due next spring. There's also an order for up to 100 million vials of Oxford's candidates that scientists say will complete clinical trials by Christmas.

Leaked NHS plans suggest vaccines could be made available to all adults in the UK by the end of January, but most 18- to 50-year-olds, who are the least likely to get sick and die from severe Covid-19, are expected to be in March vaccinated.

Professor Van-Tam and NHS England National Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis both came to Mr. Hancock from a distance for research as they are self-isolating.

He also confirmed that he was isolating "due to a household contact", while Professor Powis confirmed earlier this week that he did so after a member of his household tested positive for coronavirus.

Professor Van-Tam said, "It only takes a few seconds to create new infections through unnecessary close contact."

He said those contacts would turn to infection five to seven days later and hospitalizations a week later, adding, "You could lose this in just a few seconds."

He appealed to people to "keep pressure on this virus and get it down as much as possible by the end of the period (lockdown)."

Prof. Van-Tam warned that if the public ignored Christmas guidelines, infection rates will pick up again, saying there is a "double responsibility" for people to obey the rules.

"There is no magic number about how many days it will take us," Prof. Van-Tam said at press conference # 10.

Earlier this week, Public Health England said the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage) guidelines suggested requiring five days of more stringent action for each day of greater freedom.

Mr Hancock said it was too early to say what will happen after December 2nd when England's lockdown ends.

He said, "Over Christmas I will know how important it is that we have a system, a set of rules that both ensures people's safety and enables people to see their loved ones."

He added: “I think it would be a big boost for the whole of Britain if the four nations could come together and make a series of agreements that are safe, careful and sensible, but also allow families to see each other at Christmas . & # 39;

Professor Van-Tam said The government hoped that people could enjoy a "reasonable" Christmas season.

"The government clearly wants to give us some break this Christmas," he said.

"We as citizens all want a break, but there are no magic numbers about a Christmas Day – & # 39; n & # 39; days of repayment in relation to the lockdown."

“Part of it is about the reasonable steps the government will take to give us a decent Christmas.

“But it's also about whether we stick to the rules that then apply for this period.

DEATH WITH COVID-19 PASS 70,000

More than 70,000 deaths from Covid-19 have now occurred in the UK, new figures show.

That is an increase from 67,000 a week ago.

The total is based on the latest available death record reports as well as more recent data on the government's coronavirus dashboard.

Figures released by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency on Friday show that there had been 1,227 deaths with Covid-19 in Northern Ireland as of November 13 and were recorded as of November 18.

Separate figures released earlier this week by the National Records of Scotland showed that as of November 15, Scotland had registered 5,135 deaths with Covid-19.

As of November 6, there were a total of 59,549 coronavirus-related deaths in England and Wales, recorded as of November 14, according to the latest report from the Office of National Statistics.

Taken together, these numbers mean that to date 65,911 deaths have been recorded in the UK, where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate.

Since the creation of these statistics, an additional 4,343 deaths have been reported in the UK, according to additional data published on the government's coronavirus dashboard.

3,957 Covid-19 deaths occurred in England between November 7 and 19 and 262 in Wales.

There were 66 deaths in Northern Ireland between November 14 and 19 and 58 deaths in Scotland between November 16 and 19.

When all these sums are added, it means that there have been 70,254 deaths from Covid-19 in the UK to date.

The government's preferred measure of the official death toll, which only takes into account those who died within 28 days of being tested positive for Covid-19, is currently 54,286.

“If people don't, the first scientific principle is that things will go up again. There is a double responsibility here.

"There's no magic number about how many days it's going to take us, so we shouldn't make it that way."

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford said he was "generally hopeful" that an agreement could be reached between the four British nations on Christmas plans.

Mr. Drakeford said: "There are no sticking points so far, there are no differences of opinion." In the discussions, of which more are to take place next week.

Some of the issues discussed include travel between nations, how long restrictions could take to relax, and how much households are allowed to mix.

Northern Ireland is set to deploy a two-week breaker next Friday and Scotland has put two million people into the toughest restrictions for three weeks.

Former City Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick told LBC Radio that the police were breaking house parties but "had no interest in interrupting the family's Christmas dinner".

The Health Secretary raised hopes last week when he said it was possible to distribute the Pfizer vaccine – which will likely be approved first – to high-risk groups from December 1.

But officials are waiting for the dab to get the green light from the UK drug watchdog, who is now sifting through data from Pfizer's studies to make sure the vaccine is safe enough to administer to millions of people.

Mr Hancock said he "still hopes" the process will be completed in weeks and that vulnerable Britons could get a stab in their hands sometime next month as part of the first wave of crucial surgery.

He added that he had "personal control" of the introduction, which could result in the NHS England delivering an unprecedented million doses each day.

However, the health minister, who still fails to keep his promise of 500,000 coronavirus tests per day by the end of October, admitted that this would be "one of the largest civilian projects in history."

In addition to grappling with the massive Covid-19 vaccination program, the NHS is being asked to give 30 million flu shots – most of all time – to protect healthcare from the dual threats of both viruses.

During a round of interviews yesterday morning on BBC Radio 4 Today, Hancock said, “We have changed the law to change the number of clinically skilled people who can vaccinate as this will be one of the largest civilian projects in history.

'It will be run by the NHS, which of course has the annual experience of a mass flu vaccination program, and it will involve general practitioners, the wider NHS and hospitals.

"We have this huge flu vaccine program and then the likely big numbers when it comes out and I stress the 'if' will be for a Covid vaccine next year, but we still hope we can get something going." in December this year. & # 39;

When asked if he would take personal control of the launch, the Minister of Health said, “Yes. I've reported weekly to the Prime Minister, the NHS will take control of the delivery and they'll report to me. We have some of the best people on the NHS who spend all of their time on it. & # 39;

Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine uses genetic material called RNA from the coronavirus to trick the body into making the "spike" proteins that the virus uses to attach to cells in the body, and then trains that Immune system to attack the spikes

Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine uses genetic material called RNA from the coronavirus to trick the body into making the "spike" proteins that the virus uses to attach to cells in the body, and then trains that Immune system to attack the spikes

HOW IS HANCOCK PLANNING TO VACCINATE MILLIONS PEOPLE A DAY?

The Minister of Health has expressed ambitions to vaccinate a million Brits against Covid every day as soon as a vaccine gets the green light from the UK drug watchdog.

Though Mr. Hancock admitted that it would be "one of the greatest civil projects in history".

Typically, the NHS vaccinates 15 million people each winter for about four months against the flu.

The government plans to open dozens of mass vaccination centers for coronavirus across the country in the coming weeks.

Doctors, nurses, firefighters and soldiers are trained to administer the vaccinations.

It also recruits retired medical professionals, medical students, and other NHS workers who normally don't give vaccines – including physical therapists.

General practitioners have been instructed to organize the first wave, using community centers, village halls, and practices themselves to deliver the shocks to caregivers and the elderly as early as the next month.

The NHS is setting up a number of much larger venues to inject millions of others once those high on the priority list have received the nudges.

Empty NHS Nightingale hospitals and sports centers, including the Derby Arena, are slated to line up as possible venues.

Mr Hancock told Sky News the rollout should be "relatively straightforward" since the NHS has the infrastructure.

But health care needs to balance the unprecedented Covid drive with the largest flu vaccination program ever – 30 million people are vaccinated in the NHS, compared to the normal 15 million.

There are also logistical issues with Pfizer's vaccine, which is expected to be the first approved vaccine.

It has to be stored at -70 ° C which means the UK will have to buy special freezers and huge supplies of dry ice.

Mr Hancock said that once a Covid-19 vaccine gets the green light, dozens of mass coronavirus vaccination centers will be set up across the country in the coming weeks while firefighters are trained to help deliver the vaccinations.

General practitioners have been instructed to organize the first wave, using community centers, village halls, and practices themselves to deliver the shocks to caregivers and the elderly as early as the next month.

The NHS is setting up a number of much larger venues to inject millions of others once those high on the priority list have received the nudges.

Empty NHS Nightingale hospitals and sports centers, including the Derby Arena, are slated to line up as possible venues.

Firefighters are also encouraged to join an army of 40,000 additional workers, which will include retired medical professionals and medical students.

It was announced last night that the NHS will expand its winter flu shots to millions more this winter.

Mr. Hancock told Sky News, “Typically 15 million people are vaccinated against flu. This year it will be 30 million – the largest number in history.

& # 39; We hope that we will also have a Covid vaccination program alongside. It's going to be a tremendous effort, but I know the NHS is ready for it. & # 39;

He reiterated the comments during an interview with BBC Breakfast in which he said, "I am not denying that it is an enormous amount of work for the NHS and I am very grateful for the incredible change they and we have made this year . " We still have to deliver this winter.

"Of course there is pressure on the NHS this year – by God there is pressure thanks to Covid – and for everyone who works in the NHS, I would like to thank you for the work you are doing."

According to the Health Service Journal, full Covid vaccination is expected to begin in the New Year, although at-risk Brits may be able to begin vaccinating Covid before that.

The vaccination campaign will likely include conference centers and drive-through locations as used by the Covid testing program.

According to the Telegraph, Derby City Council has confirmed it is negotiating with the government over plans to use the Derby Arena as a vaccination site.

It could become one of the first places the vaccine will be given by mid-December.

Every major city will have its own mass vaccination center, according to Sun

The newspaper reports that 50 locations are planned in sports arenas, town halls and NHS Nightingale hospitals, as well as 1,000 smaller locations across England.

In the meantime, the NHS is set to launch a major recruiting campaign to hire up to 40,000,000 people to deliver the Pfizer vaccine, with trained medical professionals and nurses high on their wish lists.

The vaccination army that is being trained is supported by an additional 30,000-strong team of St. John Ambulance volunteers (Image: Library Image)

The vaccination army that is being trained is supported by an additional 30,000-strong team of St. John Ambulance volunteers (Image: Library Image)

The final trial results from Pfizer and BioNTech showed that only eight out of more than 20,000 people who received the vaccine received the coronavirus, compared to 162 people who were given a fake sting

The final trial results from Pfizer and BioNTech showed that only eight out of more than 20,000 people who received the vaccine received the coronavirus, compared to 162 people who were given a fake sting

BULK AUDIT STUDY SHOWS CASES DROP 18% IN THE FIRST WEEK OF lockdown

The English coronavirus outbreak slowed in the first full week of the second national shutdown, and the R-rate across the UK could be as low as 1, according to official data raising hopes for a lock-free Christmas.

The National Statistics Office's data released this afternoon showed that daily infections fell from 47,700 to 38,900 between November 8 and 14, an 18 percent decrease. The ONS said the rate of new infections "appears to have leveled off over the past week".

The promising numbers from the ONS seem to suggest that both local Tier 3 lockdown rules and, later, national shutdown are successfully slowing the spread of the virus. Statistics panel experts said: "The rate of increase (in positive tests) in England has slowed down in the last few weeks."

In the meantime, the Government's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE) announced that the "R" reproductive rate – the average number of people to whom each Covid-19 patient passes the disease – has fallen slightly to a maximum of 1.1. of a maximum of 1.2 last week and could only be 1.0 or less in any region of the UK.

The group's modeling estimates that the R is now between 1.0 and 1.1, meaning that an average of all 10 Brits with Covid will infect between 10 and 11 others.

They estimated that number between 1.0 and 1.2 last week. The R is one of many indicators that scientists use to assess the trajectory of Covid. If they drop below 1, the virus is on the decline.

The promising dates are a major boost to Boris Johnson's plans to relax the five-day lockdown over Christmas and reunite the families after a turbulent year in which loved ones were separated for months.

Negotiations between the four home countries continue as they try to find the safest way for people to celebrate the festive season without reversing the effects of the lockdown and re-flaring the virus.

But retired doctors and nurses, as well as those with first aid skills, including firefighters, police officers and members of the armed forces, are also being targeted in the recruitment campaign, Sun reports.

The vaccination army that is being trained will be supported by an additional 30,000-strong team of volunteers from St. John Ambulance, the paper adds.

The UK Medicines Agency announced earlier this week that it was waiting for Pfizer to submit the full results of its definitive Covid-19 vaccine study after the drug company claimed it was safe, 95 percent effective and works in the elderly, those most at risk of dying from the disease.

Best known for producing Viagra, the US company announced that it would submit the required data to regulators in America and the UK "within days," which raises hopes that the UK will get its big of the Army backed operation to vaccinate millions of people could start soon as December 1st.

The UK Medicines Agency MHRA has carried out an "ongoing review" of the vaccine and could therefore complete the approval process within a few days of receiving the application from Pfizer and BioNTech, the German company involved in making the sting.

Dr. June Raine, the agency's chief executive officer, said, “The results reported by Pfizer are very encouraging and complement last week's announcement.

"We look forward to receiving the full results of the studies as soon as possible. After that, we will scrutinize the evidence of the vaccine's safety and effectiveness."

The UK has already pre-ordered 40 million doses of the vaccine and is expected to receive 10 million in the next month. The NHS is preparing to distribute it within 14 days.

Professor Stephen Powis, the medical director of NHS England, said this week the health service was working "incredibly hard" to prepare.

The final trial results from Pfizer and BioNTech showed that only eight out of more than 20,000 people who received the vaccine received the coronavirus, compared to 162 people who were given a fake sting.

A total of 10 people received severe Covid-19, one of whom had received the real vaccine.

An independent safety committee has "reported no serious safety concerns with the vaccine" since the final phase of the trial began in July, Pfizer said.

Side effects were limited – the most common were fatigue, which 3.8 percent of people had, and headache (2 percent).

The updated data from Pfizer and BioNTech should reassure critics, but the government is still faced with the mammoth task of transporting and storing the pile. It may take expensive specialty freezers and huge supplies of dry ice to keep it at the required -70 ° C (-94 ° F).

The announcement is an improvement on Pfizer's earlier estimate that the vaccine was 90 percent effective, and comes just days after competitor Moderna claimed its own shock was 94.5 percent effective.

Unlike Pfizer's shock, Moderna's shock can be stored in normal fridges and freezers between -20 ° C (8 ° C) and 8 ° C (46 ° F).

Health Secretary Matt Hancock confirmed earlier this week that the UK would receive 5 million doses of the shock from March 2021 if approved by regulators.

The deal is expected to cost the UK between £ 24 ($ 32) and £ 28 ($ 37) per dose – while the US, which pre-ordered the burst months ago, will pay just $ 15 (£ 11.32) and is expected to have access will be received next month when health chiefs approve the push.

The UK is expected to pay around £ 15 per stab for the Pfizer vaccine.

Meanwhile, the home-grown vaccine developed by Oxford University and Astrazenica could cost as little as £ 2.23. The results for the UK Jab are expected in December.

Scientists warn that the final results for the Oxford vaccine will not be available for weeks

Oxford University's Covid vaccine is unlikely to be used in the UK before Christmas, as the scientists who lead the project said they don't expect results to be available to regulators until December.

The researchers published a study that confirmed that their vaccine candidate elicited an immune response in elderly people who are at greatest risk for severe Covid-19 and that studies have not found any safety issues.

However, the length of time for the sting, which number 10 has ordered 100 million doses for and which is considered to be one of the UK's greatest hopes of ending the epidemic, could stretch to early 2021 before people start injecting.

Professor Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, said he was "optimistic" that the study would provide results showing how well it protects against Covid before Christmas. However, the following process of licensing it and then delivering it to clinics is "out of our control" and could take weeks longer, he said, which would postpone delivery to next year.

Scientists behind the project this morning released the results of an early trial with the sting which found two doses to produce strong signs of immunity in 99 percent of people of all ages.

The second phase study included 560 volunteers, most of whom were White and British, and showed that people of all ages appeared to respond equally well to the bump. It complements data released in July suggesting it would work safely for children under the age of 55. Studies in people with serious health problems and other ethnic groups are ongoing.

It's another breakthrough in the race to develop a vaccine to prevent Covid after it was found that the shocks carried out by Moderna and Pfizer and BioNTech were around 95 percent effective over the past week.

The Oxford results come from an earlier stage of the studies and therefore cannot estimate how well the vaccine protects against Covid, but it is a positive step nonetheless. Research showed that people of all ages developed neutralizing antibodies – virus-destroying substances of the immune system – within 28 days of their first vaccine dose, which were further increased after the second dose.

It was found that the vaccine caused more side effects than a false prick, but that they were "mild" and more common in young people than in older participants. Within the first week after the injection, more than eight in ten under 55-year-olds said that their arm was injured and that they later experienced tiredness, muscle pain or headache. Experts said this could only be because younger people's immune systems are more active and likely to be overreacting.

Freedom for Christmas: Several families could meet for up to a week in December to relax Covid rules – although scientists warn Boris Johnson it will "throw the pandemic on fire"

As part of a nationwide relaxation of the coronavirus rules, families could meet for up to a week over Christmas, reports from last night said.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said at a meeting on Downing Street yesterday that it was too early to say what contact people might have with loved ones during the holiday season.

However, it has been suggested that Boris Johnson is preparing to announce a plan to relax the rules next week.

Ministers are expected to work out plans to free the country from shackles for a few days and allow family bubbles to gather around the house for festive celebrations.

According to the Daily Telegraph, multiple families could join a "bubble" and mingle between December 22nd and 28th.

Mr Johnson is also expected to warn that the extent of the restrictions for the remainder of the next month will depend on how well the public follows the current lockdown in England, which is set to end on December 2nd.

Boris Johnson is reportedly preparing to announce a plan to relax current lockdown rules in England

Boris Johnson is reportedly preparing to announce a plan to relax current lockdown rules in England

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said at a meeting on Downing Street yesterday that it was too early to say which contacts might have during the holiday season

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said at a meeting on Downing Street yesterday that it was too early to say which contacts might have during the holiday season

CHRISTMAS TREE SHOPPING IS BACK

By Lizzie Deane for the Daily Mail

Choosing a tree is a popular festive tradition of many families in the run-up to Christmas.

Thanks to an optimization of the Covid restrictions, buyers can now buy a tree before the holidays, even if they live in restricted areas.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has changed the rules so that Christmas tree farms and stands can reopen from today. This means that retailers selling Christmas trees are exempt from the rules requiring non-essential stores in England to close by December 2nd.

Garden centers have been allowed to stay open during the second lockdown and some have already started selling Christmas trees.

The rule change will allay fears that people might not get their hands on a tree in time for Christmas, and provide a lifeline for businesses that rely on festive trade.

But Mr. Hancock seems to rule out hugging friends and relatives during the festive season.

He told Times Radio, "I have no doubt that people will continue to respect social distancing because we know it is so important for complete control of the virus."

It comes when Met Police commissioner Dame Cressida Dick said she was "not interested in interrupting the family Christmas dinner" to catch Covid rule violations.

She told an LBC radio phone that officers were not allowed to knock on the door and count the number of people eating the turkey, adding, "The police have many other things to do."

It comes from the Prime Minister's battle to save Christmas Thursday after a government adviser insisted that allowing festive gatherings would "fuel" the pandemic.

Mr Johnson said it was his "desire to allow loved ones to celebrate Christmas together" after a tumultuous year in which families were kept apart for months.

Speaking about the coronavirus briefing last night, Mr Hancock said it would be a "boost" for Britain if a "safe, careful and sensible" set of plans could be agreed between the decentralized nations.

He said, "Over Christmas I will know how important it is that we have a system, a set of rules that both ensures people's safety and enables people to see their loved ones."

Earlier this week, Public Health England said the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (Sage) guidelines suggested that each day of greater freedom could require five days of more stringent action.

However, the assistant chief physician for England, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, who also appeared at the meeting, said there was no magic number on how many days it could take to relax the rules.

On Thursday, a number of scientific and medical experts warned that the possibility of families gathering for Christmas could trigger a third wave of coronavirus in the New Year.

Katherine Henderson, president of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, said Christmas should only be treated as one more "date of the month" this year, adding, "If Covid cases turn into hospital cases and then unfortunately turn into deaths, we will a Christmas season that Grandma Covid brought for Christmas. & # 39;

Professor Andrew Hayward, a member of the government's scientific committee, Sage, said allowing family gatherings would pose a "significant risk" of new infections.

"In my personal opinion, we attach far too much importance to a near-normal Christmas," he told Radio 4's Today program.

"We know respiratory infections peak in January, so throwing fuel on the fire over Christmas can only help."

Professor Gabriel Scally, a public health expert at Bristol University, said it was "pointless" to celebrate a Merry Christmas only to "bury friends and relatives in January and February".

A Tory MP warned it would be better for the prime minister to cancel Christmas and be branded a "Grinch" than risk a spike in deaths from Covid-19 who could label him a "Grim Reaper".

They said, “He's being held responsible (an increase in deaths). It's always mid to late January when you get the NHS winter crisis. & # 39;

Regarding number 10's new guidance on keeping windows open in winter to rinse out the lingering covid, the MP said, “When the weather is cold, people keep the windows closed. Grandma is always cold. & # 39;

Ministers are exploring a number of ways to ease restrictions this Christmas.

Following a suggestion, families from three or four households could gather but not meet anyone. An alternative would be to simply relax the rule of six to allow larger groups.

Churches are also expected to be allowed to hold services on Christmas Day. The Church of England says that "the message of the light that shines in the dark" is needed more than ever.

Downing Street believes a less constrained Christmas celebration is vital to national morale, and fears that strict rules are being ignored by families desperately searching for loved ones.

Ministers want to see the latest data on the status of the virus before deciding how far to go, and Mr Wallace said a decision will be made shortly before December 2, when the current lockdown expires.

Meanwhile, Hancock said he was increasingly hoping for normalcy by the spring, when he confirmed the UK health authority was considering a coronavirus vaccine that could potentially be launched next month.

He described the Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA) review of the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine as "another important step in combating this pandemic."

He said, “When the regulator approves a vaccine, we will be ready to start vaccination next month with most of the introduction in the new year.

"We are going in the right direction, but there is still a long way to go."

Mr Hancock added that, with news of vaccine breakthroughs in recent weeks and an expansion of mass testing, he was "increasingly confident" that life will be closer to normal by spring.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, said yesterday there was no magic number on how many days it could take to relax the rules

Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, said yesterday there was no magic number on how many days it could take to relax the rules

Ministers are exploring a number of ways to ease restrictions this Christmas. Pictured: Oxford Street in London

Ministers are exploring a number of ways to ease restrictions this Christmas. Pictured: Oxford Street in London

According to NHS documents in the Health Service Journal (HSJ), all adults in England – of all ages – could be vaccinated against Covid-19 before the end of January if supplies allow.

According to the plan, any adult who wants a sting could be vaccinated by early April.

Prof Van-Tam, who acted remotely because of a "household contact" because he was self-isolating, said people should "not worry too much" where they are on the priority list because of the difference between levels a question could be one to three weeks.

Mr. Hancock told the briefing that he did not want to “prejudice” or “compromise” the MHRA's independence when asked how long its process could take and that the speed at which a vaccine was introduced would depend on the speed of manufacture.

Mr Hancock said the virus' second peak was "flattening" but urged the public to "hold on to our resolve" so that the rest of the lockdown will keep cases down.

Professor Van-Tam also urged caution, suggesting that any gains from the second national lockdown could be quickly lost as the virus "only takes seconds" to spread.

He appealed to people to "keep pressure on this virus and get it down as much as possible by the end of the period (lockdown)."

He warned that if the public ignored the guidelines put in place around Christmas, infection rates will rise again, saying there is a "double responsibility" for people to abide by the rules set by the government.

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford previously said he was "generally hopeful" that an agreement could be reached between the four British nations on Christmas plans.

He said topics being discussed include travel between nations, how long restrictions could be relaxed, and how much households are allowed to mix, and that more talks should take place next week.

Northern Ireland is set to deploy a two-week breaker next Friday and Scotland has put two million people into the toughest restrictions for three weeks.

The government said an additional 511 people died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 on Friday, bringing the UK total to 54,286.

Another 20,252 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus have also been reported.

On Friday, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) announced that there are "significant differences" in Covid-19 infection rates in England, with rates continuing to rise in London, east England and the Southeast, but decreasing and in the Northwest the East Midlands.

Sage said the reproduction number – or R-value – for the whole of the UK had dropped to 1 to 1.1.

Downing Street declined to comment on possible Christmas rules last night.

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