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The UK government has changed its mind on corona virus rules six times


Facebook launched a campaign today to eradicate misinformation about the corona virus – but even official news has caused "significant confusion".

The British government has backtracked on issues and has constantly changed its stance during the Covid 19 crisis. She has always insisted that she follow science.

Complicated messages and changes in the heart were widespread in public, and politicians have accused the government of causing confusion.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said in parliament last month: "What the country needs is clarity and security, and both are in short supply at the moment."

He said Prime Minister Boris Johnson has contributed to "considerable confusion" about the coronavirus rules and relied heavily on appeals to common sense.

And Claudia Webbe, a MP in Leicester, a city that now needs to be closed again because the rest of the country likes to relax the rules, said last weekend: "The government's message about social distancing is confusing at best and unclear at worst . "

Other issues where messaging has been confusing are the use of ibuprofen to treat coronavirus symptoms, the use of face masks, the actual symptoms of coronavirus, the definition of "essential travel" during the block, the two-meter rule for social distancing, and the usefulness of traveler quarantine.

Here are some of the times when official messages get mixed up:

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been accused by Labor's Sir Keir Starmer of having contributed to "considerable confusion" about the coronavirus rules

The symptoms of the coronavirus

Officials refused to list a taste and smell loss as a symptom: March

Officials finally mention a loss of taste and smell as a symptom: May 18

For months, the government insisted that the symptoms of Covid-19 were a new cough or fever (high temperature) and that people with other signs of an illness were not eligible to be tested for the virus.

Scientists and doctors called for more consideration as to what symptoms were included – a sticking point was a lost sense of taste or smell.

Ear, nose and throat doctors said the number of patients reporting this worldwide had skyrocketed as the coronavirus pandemic broke out, and they couldn't find a better explanation for it.

ENT UK urged the government to list it as a symptom in Marchwhen cases first appeared in the UK.

Officials resisted while the United States began to recognize this in mid-April.

But further May 18The government decided it was a sufficiently strong indicator of Covid-19 and listed it as an official symptom, which means that people could be tested if their sense of smell or taste changed or disappeared.

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam said at the time: "It was important to investigate the (symptom) further and make sure we took it into account and implemented it at the right time … it was a pretty difficult piece of science. & # 39;

There are concerns that Britain is still behind the curve with its three official symptoms – the United States now has 11, including diarrhea, pain, fatigue, and sore throat.

The NHS lists three coronavirus symptoms, while other countries have significantly more, with 11 officially listed in the United States

The NHS lists three coronavirus symptoms, while other countries have significantly more, with 11 officially listed in the United States

Treatment of Covid-19 symptoms with ibuprofen

NHS removes advice that recommended the use of ibuprofen to treat Covid-19: mid-March

The UK completes the review of the evidence and rules for the safety of ibuprofen: April

in the middle of March The NHS removed advice on its website that people should use ibuprofen to treat the symptoms of Covid-19.

FACEBOOK LAUNCHES CAMPAIGN TO COMBAT MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19

Facebook launched a campaign today to fight fake news and misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic.

In collaboration with Full Fact from the UK, the campaign is being promoted worldwide and users are encouraged to report fake news.

Conspiracy theories are directed at Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp – all owned by Silicon Valley – as well as articles that are not true, reports Press Gazette.

The campaign page www.stampoutfalsenews.com asks Facebook users to pause, think and review what they read online.

Will Moy, managing director of Full Fact – a UK fact-checking website – told Press Gazette: "It is important that everyone receives clear, factual information about coronavirus. Bad information ruins lives …

“People should ask themselves three simple questions about everything they read online. Where does it come from What is missing? And how do you feel about it? Emotional content can make you believe wrong news. Life is at stake during this health crisis. & # 39;

The move came after a French minister said the anti-inflammatory pain reliever could "worsen" symptoms by weakening the immune response.

At the time, Sir Patrick Vallance, the UK's senior scientific advisor, said avoiding ibuprofen was "the sensible thing" if someone thought they had Covid-19 given the concerns about the common drug.

The parents came forward and said that their children, who they believed had coronavirus but could not get tests, became seriously ill after taking the medication.

Dan Collins, whose stepdaughter Amelia responded to the drug, told the Manchester Evening News: “Within an hour of giving it to her, she fell back dramatically.

She gasped as she tried to breathe, her heart rate was very fast, she could not keep her eyes open, could not lift her head, her body trembled, she became sick, and her temperature rose 39.4. & # 39;

The World Health Organization said it was reviewing the issue and advised the patient to continue to use acetaminophen.

A month later in AprilHowever, the UK government had completed the review of the evidence and decided that it is safe to continue taking Ibuprofen with Covid-19.

The Commission for Medicinal Products for Human Use, which advises ministers on the safety of medicines, said there is "insufficient evidence" to link the use of ibuprofen with the likelihood of developing coronavirus or worse symptoms .

The CHM said, "Patients can take acetaminophen or ibuprofen if they are treating themselves for symptoms of COVID-19 such as fever and headache. You should follow the NHS advice if you have any questions or if the symptoms worsen."

Studies have since claimed that the risk may still increase, but the government and NHS advice has again recommended acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

In March, the NHS removed people's advice to take ibuprofen to alleviate the symptoms of Covid-19 because it was feared that it could "worsen" the disease. Since then it has been classified as safe and the instructions have been resumed (archive picture)

In March, the NHS removed people's advice to take ibuprofen to alleviate the symptoms of Covid-19 because it was feared that it could "worsen" the disease. Since then it has been classified as safe and the instructions have been resumed (archive picture)

The Commission for Medicinal Products for Human Use, which advises ministers on the safety of medicines, said there is "insufficient evidence" to link the use of ibuprofen to the likelihood of developing coronavirus or worse symptoms of the disease ( Image: Anm NHS website)

The Commission for Medicinal Products for Human Use, which advises ministers on the safety of medicines, said there is "insufficient evidence" to link the use of ibuprofen to the likelihood of developing coronavirus or worse symptoms of the disease ( Image: Anm NHS website)

"Essential Travel" and the Dominic Cummings saga

Britain said it should travel in the block only for "essential" reasons: March 23

Boris Johnson reveals that it was okay for his executive assistant Dominic Cummings to look for childcare that he didn't need when the ban began on May 25

When Britain was in full swing March The government told people that they should only leave the house for "essential travel" to stop the virus from spreading.

Basic trips have been publicly defined to buy groceries or medicines, go to work when you have to, or go to medical appointments.

People were also allowed to deliver purchases to relatives, friends or neighbors in need of protection and to train outdoors once a day.

But there was national turmoil when it turned out that Boris Johnson's top adviser himself, Dominic Cummings, drove from London to Durham during the closure 27th of March.

In the following farce, Mr. Cummings held a press conference on television 25. May in which he said that he went to his family because he thought he would need them to look after his son if he and his wife became seriously ill with Covid-19.

The public, who had been kept away from their own families for months and faced difficult decisions about how to look after their children, was ashamed.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson stood by his aide and said he had made a sensible decision to drive more than 260 miles for childcare that he never needed.

He said, "Given the very serious childcare difficulties that Dominic Cummings and his family faced, I think what they were doing was completely understandable.

"There is indeed guidance … on what to do about the pressure families face when they have childcare needs," the BBC said.

Westminster Scottish National Party leader Ian Blackford said Cummings "undermines public confidence in the health message".

Mr. Cummings came under intense pressure to quit his job and the Durham police investigated the incident, but nothing came of it.

The Prime Minister's chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, was pressured to hold a press conference in Downing Street's garden to explain his actions when he violated the ban rules

The Prime Minister's chief adviser, Dominic Cummings, was pressured to hold a press conference in Downing Street's garden to explain his actions when he violated the ban rules

London-to-Durham: The 260-mile journey Cummings made to reach his parents' house in Durham

London-to-Durham: The 260-mile journey Cummings made to reach his parents' house in Durham

Face masks: wear or not wear?

Face masks are pointless: March

Facial masks work: April

Whether or not a face mask or "cover" should be worn has been the subject of heated debate throughout the UK coronavirus crisis.

They are already common in East Asian countries and much of the western world has worn them to curb the spread of Covid-19.

But Britain was adamant at the beginning of the crisis March that it would not tell the public to wear facewear because there was no good scientific evidence that they work.

Health Minister Matt Hancock told LBC in April: & # 39; It is absolutely clear that if you are working in a hospital or nursing home, a mask is required. So we need to make sure that this is a top priority, especially when it comes to demonstrating the use of public masks are extremely weak. & # 39;

He added, "You have to follow the evidence of how effective wearing a mask is."

However, the rules gradually became stricter. From June 5thThe government said it was mandatory for everyone in a hospital – patient or staff – to wear a mask or cover.

The government refused to recommend wearing face masks to people for months, but has since committed them to public transport and recommends them in busy places where social distance is difficult (Image: A couple in Leicester wearing masks).

The government refused to recommend wearing face masks to people for months, but has since committed them to public transport and recommends them in busy places where social distance is difficult (Image: A couple in Leicester wearing masks).

Studies suggest that wearing a face mask is unlikely to protect people from inhaling the coronavirus, but could prevent them from spreading the disease in their breath by catching droplets of the virus when they leave the person's mouth .

On Monday, May 11th, officials changed direction and advised the public to wear a mask when using public transportation or in shops or other interiors where they could not stay 2 meters away from others.

The government's Covid-19 recovery strategy states: "People should aim to wear facial coverings in enclosed spaces where social distance is not always possible."

They added that "under certain circumstances, they can help reduce the risk of transmission".

A month later, this rule tightened again – from 15th JuneIt was mandatory for people to wear face masks on public transport, with the risk of being fined if they did not.

The British Medical Association has called for masks to be used in all public institutions and has stated that the British approach is not in line with other nations.

They may become more general as part of Boris Johnson's new one meter plus social distance rule, which starts this Saturday.

Two meters of social distance to become one meter plus

Two meters of social distance are required: March

One meter of social distancing is fine: From July 4th

Social distancing has become a buzzword of 2020 and will remain, according to government leaders.

But the distance that people have to keep from each other is decreasing. Since then there has been a fixed 2-meter rule (six feet, seven inches) March in Britain.

Scientists repeated the fact that two meters away from someone significantly reduced the risk of virus-infected droplets jumping from you to them.

In early June, Professor Catherine Noakes, an airborne infection specialist at the University of Leeds, told The Times: “There are too many cases in the community to consider going under two meters.

“A transfer is already taking place when we have used the (two meter) distance. If we reduce it, you essentially double the risk.

"If you have a poorly ventilated room and someone is four meters away – if there is a high virus output in this room, it can lead to infection."

But holes were made in the rule when it turned out that other countries had 1.5 m or even 1 m social distance rules, and the World Health Organization itself recommends "at least one meter (three feet)".

Two-meter markings were placed on sidewalks, supermarket floors, and public transportation across the country to help people keep a safe distance.

But this Saturday The rule is changed to "one meter plus" to help places like shops, pubs, cafes and restaurants do business.

The shopping experience was changed by rules according to which people must be 2 m apart at all times if possible. Long, spatial queues and one-in-one-out policies are commonplace

The shopping experience was changed by rules according to which people must be 2 m apart at all times if possible. Long, spatial queues and one-in-one-out policies are commonplace

As of this Saturday, the 2-meter rule was reduced to "one meter plus", which, according to official information, is intended to help hospitality businesses such as pubs reopen. Pictured: In preparation for July 4th, employees outside a pub are laying social distance lines on the sidewalk

As of this Saturday, the 2-meter rule was reduced to "one meter plus", which, according to official information, is intended to help hospitality businesses such as pubs reopen. Pictured: In preparation for July 4th, employees outside a pub are laying social distance lines on the sidewalk

The rule means "one meter plus damage limitation" and says that people should try to stay 2 meters apart, but that one meter – not yet called safe enough – would be enough if other measures were taken.

It is not yet clear which remedial measures are acceptable where and how they are implemented. This could include masks, screens between people, and standing side by side instead of face to face, which could reduce the risk of virus transmission.

Quarantine for international arrivals

International arrivals are not quarantined: January

International arrivals are quarantined: June 8th

When coronavirus cases occurred in countries around the world January and FebruaryThe international flights continued unabated.

Some countries prevented the entry of passengers from certain countries – Italy banned flights from China and the United States and later extended the ban to Europe – but Britain did not stop flights or set rules at airports or for arriving passengers.

For a short time, the Federal Foreign Office said that people arriving from Italy or a number of countries in East Asia should isolate themselves for two weeks, but this was voluntary.

The airlines ended the flights themselves because passengers no longer booked tickets, but the borders of Great Britain remained open.

From 8th JuneHowever, the government made it compulsory for tourists traveling to or to the UK to isolate themselves for two weeks upon arrival in the UK. If they refused, they were refused entry.

The international arrival quarantine in the UK has only just been introduced because there are tens of thousands of cases in the country - it was suppressed at the start of the pandemic (Image: People at Heathrow Airport in London).

The international arrival quarantine in the UK has only just been introduced because there are tens of thousands of cases in the country – it was suppressed at the start of the pandemic (Image: People at Heathrow Airport in London).

The Department of Health website says, "It can take up to 14 days for you to develop coronavirus symptoms after you discover the virus. During this time, you can unwittingly pass it on to others, even if you don't have any symptoms."

"Self-isolating will reduce the likelihood of a second wave of coronavirus in the UK, help prevent family, friends and the community from getting coronavirus and protect the NHS."

However, there is a long list of exceptions, including many people traveling to work, and officials are now saying that they will "airlift" with some countries so that people can go on vacation and not have to isolate themselves when they return .

The countries on this list will reportedly consist of countries with outbreaks of coronavirus that are under control and so far include Italy, Spain and Greece. However, it is not clear how the safety of these trips is assessed.

Professor Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said this month that the rule "should be dropped as soon as possible".

Professor Piot told the Andrew Marr Show: “We don't have to look beyond our own limits. The virus is here, adding that the rule was "completely useless".

"That only makes sense at the beginning before we have cases where they were actually imported," he said.

“It won't do much today and the damage it does to the country – the economy – will be enormous.

"So let's hope that this rule is dropped as soon as possible and let's focus on what works."

When was UK CORONAVIRUS 'advice changed or not clear?

The symptoms of the coronavirus

For months, the government insisted that the symptoms of Covid-19 were a new cough or fever (high temperature) and that people with other signs of an illness were not eligible to be tested for the virus.

Scientists and doctors called for more consideration as to what symptoms were included – a sticking point was a lost sense of taste or smell.

Ear, nose and throat doctors said the number of patients reporting this worldwide had skyrocketed as the coronavirus pandemic broke out, and they couldn't find a better explanation for it.

ENT UK urged the government to list it as a symptom in March, when cases first appeared in the UK.

Officials resisted while the United States began to recognize this in mid-April.

But on May 18, the government decided it was a sufficiently strong indicator of Covid-19 and listed it as an official symptom, which means that people could be tested if their sense of smell or taste changes or disappears.

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam said at the time: "It was important to investigate the (symptom) further and make sure we took it into account and implemented it at the right time … it was a pretty difficult piece of science. & # 39;

There are concerns that Britain is still behind the curve with its three official symptoms – the United States now has 11, including diarrhea, pain, fatigue, and sore throat.

"Essential Travel" and the Dominic Cummings saga

When Britain was completely banned, the government told people to leave the house only for "essential travel" to stop the virus from spreading.

Basic trips have been publicly defined to buy groceries or medicines, go to work when you have to, or go to medical appointments.

People were also allowed to deliver purchases to relatives, friends or neighbors in need of protection and to train outdoors once a day.

But there was national turmoil when it turned out that Boris Johnson's top adviser himself, Dominic Cummings, drove from London to Durham during the closure.

The following farce led to Mr. Cummings holding a television press conference where he said he went to his family because he thought he would need them to look after his son if he and his wife were with Covid-19 would become seriously ill.

The public, who had been kept away from their own families for months and faced difficult decisions about how to look after their children, was ashamed.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson stood by his aide and said he had made a sensible decision to drive more than 260 miles for childcare that he never needed.

Westminster Scottish National Party leader Ian Blackford said Cummings "undermines public confidence in the health message".

Mr. Cummings came under intense pressure to quit his job and the Durham police investigated the incident, but nothing came of it.

Face masks: wear or not wear?

Whether or not a face mask or "cover" should be worn has been the subject of heated debate throughout the UK coronavirus crisis.

They are already common in East Asian countries and much of the western world has worn them to curb the spread of Covid-19.

But Britain insisted at the start of the crisis that it would not ask the public to wear facewear because there was no good scientific evidence that they worked.

Health Minister Matt Hancock told LBC in April: “It is absolutely clear that a mask is required if you are working in a hospital or nursing home. So we have to make sure that this is a top priority. especially when the evidence of mask use by the general public is extremely weak. "

He added, "You have to follow the evidence of how effective wearing a mask is."

However, the rules gradually became stricter. As of June 5, the government said that everyone in a hospital – patient or staff – must wear a mask or blanket.

Studies suggest that wearing a face mask is unlikely to protect people from inhaling the coronavirus, but could prevent them from spreading the disease in their breath by catching droplets of the virus when they leave the person's mouth .

On Monday, May 11th, officials changed direction and advised the public to wear a mask when using public transportation, or in shops or other interiors where they could not stay 2 m away from others.

The government's Covid-19 recovery strategy states: "People should aim to wear face coverings in enclosed spaces where social distance is not always possible."

They added that "under certain circumstances, they can help reduce the risk of transmission".

A month later, this rule tightened again – from June 15, it was mandatory for people to wear face masks in public transport, with a risk of being fined if they don't.

The British Medical Association has called for masks to be required in all public institutions and has stated that the British approach is not in line with other nations.

Sie werden möglicherweise allgemeiner als Teil von Boris Johnsons neuer sozialer Distanzierungsregel „Ein Meter plus“, die an diesem Samstag beginnt.

Zwei Meter soziale Distanzierung, um ein Meter plus zu werden

Soziale Distanzierung ist zu einem Schlagwort des Jahres 2020 geworden, und laut den führenden Wissenschaftlern der Regierung ist sie hier, um zu bleiben.

Aber der Abstand, den Menschen untereinander einhalten müssen, nimmt ab. In Großbritannien gibt es seit März eine feste 2-Meter-Regel (sechs Fuß, sieben Zoll).

Wissenschaftler wiederholten die Tatsache, dass zwei Meter von jemandem entfernt das Risiko, dass virusinfizierte Tröpfchen von ihnen zu Ihnen springen, erheblich verringert.

Anfang Juni erklärte Professor Catherine Noakes, eine Expertin für Infektionen in der Luft an der Universität von Leeds, gegenüber The Times: „Es gibt zu viele Fälle in der Gemeinde, als dass wir in Betracht ziehen könnten, unter zwei Meter zu gehen.

„Es findet bereits eine Übertragung statt, wenn wir die (zwei Meter) Distanzierung angewendet haben. Wenn wir es reduzieren, verdoppeln Sie im Wesentlichen das Risiko.

"Wenn Sie einen schlecht belüfteten Raum haben und jemand vier Meter entfernt ist – wenn sich in diesem Raum ein hoher Virusausstoß befindet, kann dies zu einer Infektion führen."

Aber es wurden Löcher in die Regel geschlagen, als sich herausstellte, dass andere Länder 1,5 m oder sogar 1 m soziale Distanzierungsregeln hatten, und die Weltgesundheitsorganisation selbst empfiehlt „mindestens einen Meter (drei Fuß)“.

Zwei-Meter-Markierungen wurden auf Bürgersteigen, Supermarktböden und öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln im ganzen Land angebracht, um den Menschen zu helfen, den Sicherheitsabstand zu halten.

Aber an diesem Samstag wird die Regel auf "einen Meter plus" geändert, um Orten wie Geschäften, Pubs, Cafés und Restaurants zu helfen, Geschäfte zu machen.

Die Regel bedeutet "ein Meter plus Schadensbegrenzung" und besagt, dass die Menschen versuchen sollten, 2 Meter voneinander entfernt zu bleiben, aber dass ein Meter – bisher nicht sicher genug genannt – ausreichen würde, wenn andere Maßnahmen getroffen würden.

Welche Abhilfemaßnahmen wo akzeptabel sind und wie sie durchgesetzt werden, ist noch nicht klar. Dazu könnten Masken, Bildschirme zwischen Personen und das Stehen nebeneinander statt von Angesicht zu Angesicht gehören, was das Risiko einer Virusübertragung verringern könnte.

Quarantäne für internationale Besucher

Als im Januar und Februar in Ländern auf der ganzen Welt Fälle von Coronaviren auftraten, wurden die internationalen Flüge unvermindert fortgesetzt.

Einige Länder verhinderten die Einreise von Passagieren aus bestimmten Ländern – Italien verbot Flüge aus China und den USA und dehnte das Verbot später auf Europa aus -, aber Großbritannien stoppte weder Flüge noch stellte es Regeln auf Flughäfen oder für ankommende Passagiere auf.

Für eine kurze Zeit sagte das Auswärtige Amt, dass Personen, die aus Italien oder einer Reihe von Ländern in Ostasien anreisen, sich zwei Wochen lang selbst isolieren sollten, dies war jedoch freiwillig.

Die Fluggesellschaften stellten die Flüge schließlich selbst ein, weil die Passagiere keine Tickets mehr buchten, aber die Grenzen Großbritanniens blieben offen.

Ab dem 8. Juni verpflichtete die Regierung jedoch alle Touristen, die nach oder nach Großbritannien reisen, sich bei ihrer Ankunft in Großbritannien zwei Wochen lang selbst zu isolieren. Wenn sie sich weigerten, wurde ihnen die Einreise verweigert.

Auf der Website des Gesundheitsministeriums heißt es: "Es kann bis zu 14 Tage dauern, bis Sie Coronavirus-Symptome entwickeln, nachdem Sie das Virus entdeckt haben. In dieser Zeit können Sie es unwissentlich an andere weitergeben, auch wenn Sie keine Symptome haben."

"Selbstisolierend wird die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer zweiten Welle von Coronaviren in Großbritannien verringern und dazu beitragen, dass Familie, Freunde und die Gemeinde nicht an Coronaviren erkranken, und den NHS schützen."

Es gibt jedoch eine lange Liste von Ausnahmen, darunter viele Menschen, die zur Arbeit reisen, und Beamte sagen jetzt, dass sie mit einigen Ländern „Luftbrücken“ errichten werden, damit die Menschen in den Urlaub fahren können und sich bei ihrer Rückkehr nicht isolieren müssen.

Die Länder auf dieser Liste werden Berichten zufolge aus Ländern mit Coronavirus-Ausbrüchen bestehen, die unter Kontrolle sind und bislang Italien, Spanien und Griechenland umfassen. Es ist jedoch nicht klar, wie die Sicherheit dieser Reisen bewertet wird.

Professor Peter Piot, Direktor der Londoner Schule für Hygiene und Tropenmedizin, sagte diesen Monat, dass die Regel "so schnell wie möglich fallen gelassen werden sollte".

Professor Piot sagte gegenüber der Andrew Marr Show: „Wir müssen nicht über unsere eigenen Grenzen hinausschauen. Der Virus ist hier und fügt hinzu, dass die Regel "völlig nutzlos" war.

"Das macht erst am Anfang Sinn, bevor wir Fälle haben, in denen sie tatsächlich importiert wurden", sagte er.

„Das wird heute nicht viel beitragen und der Schaden, den es dem Land – der Wirtschaft – zufügt, wird enorm sein.

"Hoffen wir also, dass diese Regel so schnell wie möglich fallen gelassen wird, und konzentrieren wir uns auf das, was funktioniert."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Keir Starmer (t) Nachrichten der britischen Regierung und Aktualisierungen des britischen Kabinetts (t) Coronavirus