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The Tower of London bosses are planning a moat garden to celebrate the Queen's platinum anniversary in 2022


Flower power! The Tower of London bosses are planning a Commonwealth-style garden in the historic moat to celebrate the Queen's platinum anniversary in 2022

  • Historic royal palaces, which manage the tower, revealed the impression of an artist
  • The garden is said to be 70 years after the queen's coronation
  • On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the First World War, the moat was filled with ceramic poppies in 2014
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19

The Tower of London has long been an imposing feature of the British capital's skyline and has defenses that once kept the intruders away.

However, the moat is to be converted into a garden with Commonwealth motifs to attract new visitors to the Queen's platinum anniversary in 2022.

The historic royal palaces that govern the tower have revealed an artist's impression of what the moat might look like 70 years after the queen's coronation.

The picture shows the space transformed with trees, manicured hedges and snake paths in which tourists can navigate.

The Tower of London has long been an imposing feature of the British capital's skyline and has defenses that once kept the intruders away. However, the moat is to be turned into a garden to attract new visitors to the Queen's platinum anniversary in 2022

The moat was rebuilt in 2014 when thousands of ceramic poppies were installed to mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War.

Historic Royal Palaces CEO John Barnes said the planned garden could be a "key moment" for the return of tourists, according to The Times.

The tower has been closed since March as part of measures to block corona viruses.

Mr. Barnes said his organization's modeling predicted it could be in 2022 before overseas visitors, who accounted for around 65 percent of income, returned in large numbers.

"We know that tourism gets a boost during an anniversary and that a halo effect usually occurs afterwards," he told The Times.

Historic Royal Palaces CEO John Barnes said the planned garden could be a "key moment" for the return of tourists. Pictured: The moat as it normally looks

Historic Royal Palaces CEO John Barnes said the planned garden could be a "key moment" for the return of tourists. Pictured: The moat as it normally looks

He added that he is trying to get officials and the government to focus on the project to increase visitor numbers.

Investing in what he called "anniversary glasses" would "boost tourism at home and abroad," he said.

He tried to "nudge" officials and the government, "get out of crisis mode a bit, and focus on the future," he said.

The garden is themed around the Commonwealth, but its creation would require government funding.

Historic royal palaces were hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Forecasts for sales of £ 110m for this fiscal year have been lowered to £ 14m.

The moat was rebuilt in 2014 when thousands of ceramic poppies were installed to mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War

The moat was rebuilt in 2014 when thousands of ceramic poppies were installed to mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War

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