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The theme park set up opposite the Covid Test Center triggers anger


Coventry residents slammed an amusement park set up for halftime just meters from a large coronavirus testing center as the city is now subject to Tier 2 coronavirus restrictions.

The Pleasureland theme park experience has been put together in the Rioch Arena parking lot as coronavirus cases continue to rise in the area.

The halftime fair didn't look particularly fun when it opened on Friday night. Pictures show an almost deserted theme park in the parking lot of the Ricoh Arena – home of the Wasps Rugby Union team.

Aerial photos showed that just a few meters away – on the A444 – the Covid-19 drive-through test center in Judds Lane is in operation and a row of white tents are set up in a separate parking lot.

However, the testing center also appeared to be empty, with little evidence of activity in and around the tents, as coronavirus cases continue to rise in the region and country.

Aerial view of the Covid-19 test center on the A444 in Coventry, directly across from the & # 39; Pleasureland theme park & ​​# 39; the Ricoh Arena, due to open on October 22nd

Pictures of the theme park showed it was empty, but when it opened on Friday night, somber pictures show how many families show up

Pictures of the theme park showed it was empty, but when it opened on Friday night, somber pictures show how many families show up

Gloomy pictures showed a ton of families showing up when the theme park opened on Friday night as residents called for it to close.

Pleasureland opened just a few hours later. After a sharp spike in Covid-19 cases, the city moved into the second tier high risk category.

The infection rate per 100,000 people in the city rose from 165.3 in the week ended October 11 to 179.3 in the week ended October 18.

Speaking to CoventryLive, Julie Porter, 39, a mum of two, a Coventry library assistant, said, “I think it's crazy to have a fair in the current climate, much less across the street from a testing center.

“I can't sit in a pub with six friends after 10 p.m., but I can go on a ride with complete strangers, that doesn't make sense.

In the meantime, social media users have urged the fair to close immediately in the event that emerges, pointing out the absurdity of opening a theme park during the crisis.

Directly across from the A444 in Coventry, from the Rioch Arena and & # 39; Pleasureland Theme Park & ​​# 39; away, the Covid-19 drive-through test center is located on Judds Lane (left picture).

Directly across from the A444 in Coventry, from the Rioch Arena and & # 39; Pleasureland Theme Park & ​​# 39; away, the Covid-19 drive-through test center is located on Judds Lane (left picture).

Owner Tommy Wilson said, "We are one of the safest trade shows in the country, our cleaning programs are second to none, and we do everything we can to keep our customers safe."

Owner Tommy Wilson said, "We are one of the safest trade shows in the country, our cleaning programs are second to none, and we do everything we can to keep our customers safe."

Terri Bowden wrote on Facebook: "This needs to be closed when we get into Tier 2. Too many people are affected."

Steven Prew wrote, "Tier 3 on the way to Coventry."

Alan Court wrote, “I can't see my family inside, but I can ride the goddamn ghost train with a lot of strangers. Thank you. & # 39;

Steve Millar wrote, “How will an amusement fair be allowed when the city is in Tier 2? And why should an amusement fair be allowed that is obviously a risk but rejects everything else? It's an absolute joke. & # 39;

Deanne Bowell wrote, “I bet there won't be any social distancing or cleaning of the rides. It's so strange how rugby can't have spectators who could easily have social distance (outside), I may add, but a packed fair is noisy! & # 39;

Ian Titford wrote, "Drop the kids at the fair while you might drop by for a Covid test."

People on social media reacted in disbelief to the theme park's existence, and Netziens asked the fair to close immediately

People on social media reacted in disbelief to the theme park's existence, and Netziens called for the fair to close immediately

Terri Bowden wrote on Facebook: "This needs to be closed when we enter Tier 2. Too many people are affected."

Terri Bowden wrote on Facebook: "This needs to be closed when we enter Tier 2. Too many people are affected."

The Pleasureland Theme Park Experience, operated by Wilson & # 39; s Amusements, runs through November 1st

The Pleasureland Theme Park Experience, operated by Wilson & # 39; s Amusements, runs through November 1st

Linda Prestidge wrote, “I cannot visit families in their homes, but I can go to a fair with complete strangers. I don't think all rides are cleaned all day – cleaning like in pubs, restaurants and hairdressers. & # 39;

Michelle Millic wrote, "Damn stupid to have a mass."

Carlos Chebworth wrote, "Hook a duck is different this year – instead of a goldfish, you get COVID."

The Pleasureland Theme Park Experience, operated by Wilson & # 39; s Amusements, runs through November 1st.

Coventry is among a number of other regions in the Central Plateau that are undergoing Tier 2 bans. It entered Tier 2 today along with Stoke and Slough in the southeast

Coventry is among a number of other regions in the Central Plateau that are undergoing Tier 2 bans. It entered Tier 2 today along with Stoke and Slough in the southeast

The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 yesterday, but official data suggests the country's outbreak may be slowing

The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 yesterday, but official data suggests the country's outbreak may be slowing

The beleaguered NHS test and trace system

NHS Test and Trace has received sustained criticism in recent months after statistics showed it had repeated problems getting in touch with the contacts of people who tested positive.

Test and Trace boss Dido Harding admitted last week that the program is not a "silver bullet" to solve the coronavirus crisis, as Michael Gove defended giving police access to self-isolation data.

Baroness Harding said the £ 12 billion program was "undoubtedly a very important" part of the government's efforts to fight the spread of infection.

But she said "it never was and never will be" the only solution to combating the outbreak.

Their comments came after Mr Gove said police officers will work "very proportionately" if it is alleged that the government's decision to tell them who should self-isolate could prevent people from being tested.

The Minister for the Cabinet Office said it was appropriate to take action when there were "persistent, apparent and willful" violations of the rules.

Last week it was found that the system had failed to reach nearly a quarter of a million close contacts from people who tested positive.

Prior to its establishment, the testing program was widely billed as a key to controlling the spread of the disease.

But Baroness Harding told the Sunday Times, “Everyone wants to believe that Test and Trace are silver bullets.

& # 39; It never has been and never will be. Unfortunately, the virus doesn't behave in such a way that there is a silver bullet.

"The only way to live with Covid is through a number of different interventions, of which test and trace are undoubtedly very important."

After the Department of Health and Welfare (DHSC) announced that police forces have access to information on a "case-by-case" basis, they can determine if a person has been asked to self-isolate.

The Health Service Journal (HSJ) reported that England's chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty’s office feared the move would deter people from being tested.

People in England are legally required to self-isolate if they test positive for Covid-19. The fines start from £ 1,000 for those who fail and go up to £ 10,000 for repeat offenders or serious violations.

The much-belated NHS Test and Trace smartphone app was restarted at the end of September.

England's beleaguered app, the first version of which had to be scrapped in June after a series of bugs, has now been rebuilt using technology from Google and Apple.

Owner Tommy Wilson said: “We are one of the safest trade shows in the country, our cleaning systems are second to none and we do everything we can to keep our customers safe.

& # 39; We operate a bracelet policy to keep numbers down. We're 60 percent busy, so social distancing is easier to maintain.

“I have my children and grandchildren here and I will not do anything to endanger their health.

“You are more likely to catch the virus at your local Tesco if a lot of people are handling the same items and putting them back on the shelves. I understand that some people are still scared, but we need to find a way to keep going. & # 39;

Comment was requested from Coventry City Council.

Greater Manchester reached the highest alert level, Tier 3, on Friday morning and Wales put in place its two-week lockdown on "fire safety" at 6pm last night.

Coventry, Stoke and Slough entered Tier 2 today, while talks between Westminster and Heads of State in Nottingham about possible Tier 3 restrictions continued yesterday.

The UK announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 people yesterday, but official data suggests that the country's outbreak may be slowing.

Positive tests were up 31 percent last Friday from 15,650, and deaths were up 65 percent in a week.

However, government scientists claimed the crucial R-rate had decreased slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to be, although the epidemic is still growing.

SAGE estimates that the UK's reproductive rate fell for the first time in a month from 1.3-1.5 to 1.2-1.4.

The number – the key measure in number 10's plan to fight the virus – must stay below one or the outbreak will continue to grow.

The NHS testing and tracking system has come under fire from many quarters, and Prime Minister Boris Johnson even admitted its shortcomings on Thursday.

Less than six out of ten close contacts of those who test positive for Covid-19 are reached by tracers, well below the 80 percent target.

And the numbers released on Thursday show that only one in seven people get virus test results within 24 hours, the lowest ever recorded.

The Prime Minister said, "I share people's frustrations and I fully understand why we are seeing faster turnaround times and need to improve them."

Sir Patrick Vallance, Senior Scientific Advisor, added, “The truth is, when the numbers are high, it becomes much more difficult to get tests, traces and isolations.

“So it's much more effective when the numbers are low. It is very clear that there is room for improvement. & # 39;

The numbers show that in the week leading up to October 14th, only 15 percent of those tested in the community got their result within 24 hours.

That's a 32.8 percent decrease from the previous week and the lowest since Test and Trace began.

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