ENTERTAINMENT

The tenant, who lives rent-free in the house under an eviction ban, says he will be forced to live "on the street".


A tenant who refuses to move out and forces the family that owns it to stay overseas says he will repay the landlords "when it's all over" – but kicking him out now would have him, a baby and a pregnant woman "letting out the road".

Homeowners Emma and Russell Burton, 41, live with their parents in France after the tenant stopped paying rent and refused to leave their Merseyside home.

The family left home In early 2019 in Newton-le-Willows for Qatar, where Emma and Russell found work and started renting their home through a rental agency.

Within a few months they decided to return to the UK, bIn December 2019, they said their tenants had stopped paying the £ 800 rent and refused to leave the house – which meant they couldn't return.

Now, in the modern row house, the tenant insists on being sensible and paying them back if they can.

He told MailOnline, "We want to be outside, but they only seem to have us on the street with one year old and one 35 week pregnant woman."

Emma Burton and her family live in France with her parents after the tenant who rented his Merseyside home stopped paying rent and refused to leave

The family left their home in Newton-le-Willows for Qatar, where Emma and Russell found work, in early 2019 and began renting their home through a rental agency

The family left their home in Newton-le-Willows for Qatar, where Emma and Russell found work, in early 2019 and began renting their home through a rental agency

The couple's four-year-old son, Thomas, has a rare metabolic disorder and requires medication and a special diet. However, since they are not French citizens, they cannot access the country's health system

The couple's four-year-old son, Thomas, has a rare metabolic disorder and requires medication and a special diet. However, since they are not French citizens, they cannot access the country's health system

The tenant added, “I told them I would pay when it was all over, but right now we just don't have the money.

& # 39; I've dropped from around 4,000 a month to 800 because of the coronavirus.

“I told the real estate agent, but they didn't call me.

"Nobody expected it to take that long."

The situation for the Burtons and their two children, Thomas and Poppy, had worsened when the government extended the eviction ban until September 20.

Many are grateful for government intervention to prevent evictions by rogue landlords, but the Burtons, who rely on rental income to support themselves, have been hard hit.

The Burtons claim their tenant is still working as a car salesman despite taking a rental vacation.

The situation was compounded by the government's imposition of an eviction ban during the pandemic.

Landlords across the country fear they could be left without income indefinitely if the ban is extended further. They called the eviction ban a "kick in the teeth".

Many have been pushed to the edge of their finances and nearly two in five private landlords in the country have been in arrears with rents last year.

A survey of landlords reported by The Times found that the aggregate debt rose nearly £ 300 million during the five months of lockdown.

Boris Johnson and Lord Jonathan Marland. In a letter to the Prime Minister, the National Residential Landlords Association asked for help for landlords

Boris Johnson and Lord Jonathan Marland. In a letter to the Prime Minister, the National Residential Landlords Association asked for help for landlords

According to the government, around 600,000 tenants had the option of stopping paying their rent or paying at a reduced rate as the lockdown restrictions affected jobs.

Ben Beadle of the National Residential Landlords Association, who conducted the survey, told the newspaper, “Most landlords are not real estate tycoons with deep pockets who can subsidize rents indefinitely, but ordinary people who depend on that income to pay their living expenses.

"The ministers must use the next four weeks to work out a credible plan that will pay off the rent arrears caused by the pandemic and restart the legal process."

Courts, which typically handle up to 10,000 eviction requests per month, are expected to be in significant backlog once restrictions are lifted.

The National Residential Landlords Association stated that 94 percent of landlords rent properties as an individual, with 45 percent renting just one property and 38 percent renting between two and five.

In a letter to the prime minister, the association said: “As a result of this measure, withdrawals due to rent arrears will only be treated as a priority after tenants have accumulated rental debts worth over a year.

"This means that it is entirely possible that landlords will have no income for up to two years."

The association said landlords will also run into financial difficulties themselves because they are unable to evict tenants who are not paying rent.

On August 21, the government announced the four-week extension of the eviction ban, which means that no legal evictions will have taken place for a total of six months (file picture).

On August 21, the government announced the four-week extension of the eviction ban, which means that no legal evictions will have taken place for a total of six months (file picture).

Their letter stated that the ban could mean many landlords default on their mortgages and that they could face legal action if they are unable to meet certain requirements on their property due to loss of income.

They argue that if they are unable to evict tenants, landlords will be much more critical about who to rent to.

Mr Beadle said, “The vast majority of landlords have worked constructively with their tenants to maintain leases that have arrears as a direct result of the pandemic.

“Government action is a kick in the teeth for all of these landlords who did the right thing.

“The ministers must use the next four weeks to work out a credible plan that will pay off the rent arrears resulting from the pandemic and hear the judicial proceedings again.

“It is not a solution to prevent landlords from legally terminating failed and disruptive leases. The government must act to meet the cost of providing housing. She cannot expect landlords to pay the bill for not helping households. "

First announced in March, the system prevents landlords seeking control of their properties from filing property claims in the courts.

& # 39; (The eviction ban) is now in effect until September 20th, and then there is also a backlog in the courts so we don't know when it will actually go to court so we can get a possession warrant to get her out of there, "Emma told the Liverpool Echo.

Mr. and Mrs. Burton's four-year-old son, Thomas, has a rare metabolic disorder and requires medication and a special diet. However, since they are not French citizens, he cannot access the country's health system.

Emma is now concerned that without appropriate medication, Thomas will "experience irreversible brain damage."

She said, “We cannot go back to our house, but because the tenant is not paying rent, we cannot afford a mortgage or rent any other property.

“When we came from Qatar, a nutritionist kindly gave him enough food and medicine to keep him going until the end of September. At this point we expected everything to be sorted out and back to the UK and we were able to re-register Doctors and Alder Hey. & # 39;

With the family stuck in France, they fear Thomas & # 39; will run out of medicines in late September.

And without money from work or renting her property, Emma might not be able to afford her mortgage.

The government announced on August 21 the four-week extension of the eviction ban, which means there have been no legal evictions for a total of six months.

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