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The Scottish daily Covid cases are still higher than when Nicola Sturgeon lockdown the country


Coronavirus cases in Scotland remain stubborn, data shows, despite Nicola Sturgeon rolling out a breaker weeks before the UK lockdown was announced.

On September 25, the First Minister imposed, among other things, a ban on home visits for Scots.

However, data shows that the number of people who tested positive for the virus is still related to the level after almost two months.

On the day the breaker went into effect, Scotland had 574 new cases and a total of 27,762 cases.

Daily numbers since then have often been more than double what they were on Tuesday when 1,243 tested positive.

The seven-day moving average has also doubled from 540.3 seven weeks ago to 1,160.

As a result, the cumulative total has increased and is now just under 80,000.

Daily numbers since then have often been more than double what they were when restrictions were introduced on Sept. 25, including as recently as Tuesday when 1,243 tested positive

The death toll has also risen significantly, with only one reported on the day of the new restrictions, compared to 32 earlier this week

The death toll has also risen significantly, with only one reported on the day of the new restrictions, compared to 32 earlier this week

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon imposed, among other things, a ban on home visits for Scots on September 25

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, among other things, imposed a ban on home visits for Scots on September 25th

The death toll has also risen significantly, with only one reported on the day of the new restrictions, compared to 32 earlier this week.

The total number of Covid deaths since the pandemic began is now more than 4,600.

In England, cases have generally declined since the second lockdown was enforced on November 5th. Since then, all but two fewer have been reported, including just 951 on Thursday – less than half the number seen a week earlier.

In her address to the nation on Sept. 25, Ms. Sturgeon focused on teenagers after raising concerns about major university outbreaks and called on students to do their part to contain the spread of the virus.

Outlining the new measures, she said, "With a few limited exceptions, neither of us should be visiting each other at this time.

“We are not allowed to meet in groups of more than six people from a maximum of two households outdoors or in public indoor spaces.

“Children under the age of 12 are not exposed to these limits outdoors, so they can play with their friends. Teenagers aged 12 to 17 are exempt from the two-household limit they can maintain outdoors in groups of up to six, but all six people don't have to be from just two households.

& # 39; Starting today, all hospitality premises will be closed at 10 p.m. in an attempt to reduce the amount of time people spend in licensed premises.

“We also ask people to limit visits and social interactions in pubs and restaurants as much as possible.

“These measures are tough, I know they are tough, but they are necessary if we are to keep schools open, resume more non-Covid NHS services, keep nursing homes safe and protect jobs.

"The danger – if we don't act now – is that the virus will spread further and later on, even stricter or longer-lasting restrictions will be required."

A complex five-tier system has since been in place, with those on the high end having restrictions almost as severe as the full lockdown that was imposed across the UK in March when everyone was told to stay home.

In the meantime, Wales has had some success following the introduction of the "Fire Safety" lockdown on October 23rd. Cases dropped dramatically as they peaked at 1,582 per week due to restrictions in place.

Since then, the seven-day moving average has fallen from 1304.6 to 874.6.

In Northern Ireland, where restrictions are also in place, the number of daily cases fell from 1,118 last month to just 408 on Thursday, with the moving average being 571.3 versus 1006.7.