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The SAGE expert warns that further intervention may be needed to open schools next month


Which lockdown easing measures have been postponed today?

Wedding receptions of more than 30 people may no longer take place as planned today. They will be postponed until at least August 14th

Test sporting events will be put on hold for the next two weeks until August 15th.

Close contact with Beauty Services Facials cannot be opened until August 15th.

Casinos, bowling alleys and ice rinks can only be reopened on the same day.

But Boris Johnson urged workers to return to work as planned next week.

Face masks will be mandatory in most public interiors, including places of worship and museums.

police will have new powers to enforce social distance rules, including wearing face masks.

One of the government's best scientific advisors warned that "further intervention" might be needed to get students back to school next month, as he suggested that ministers decide whether pubs are more important than schools.

Professor Graham Medley's comments come after the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (Sage) warned of anger about local locks that would cause unrest in the coming months, "all attempts" to control the corona virus, and "catastrophic" recovery plans to undermine, "overwhelm".

Britain was prepared for new restrictions on meeting friends and family last night as a price for children's return to school.

Boris Johnson said he depressed the brake pedal to loosen the blocking measures after the infections doubled within a month.

Professor Medley, a member of Sage, said today that England should consider closing pubs today to reopen schools next month.

When asked about chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty's prediction that the country was "close to the borders" of opening up society, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine scientist told BBC Radio 4's Today program: " I think that is quite possible.

“I think we are in a situation where most people think that opening schools is a priority for children's health and well-being and that in this case we will reconnect many households.

“So if we close some of the other networks, some other activities may be needed to open schools.

"It could be a question of balancing each other and then it's about setting priorities. Do we think pubs are more important than schools?"

He claimed that the restrictions imposed this week in north-west England were "highly unlikely" to be "the last intervention that needs to be done regionally" and added: "I assume there are others in other countries must be places at different times. & # 39;

It is a paper that has been reviewed by Sage's Police and Security Behavioral Pandemic Influenza Group (SPI-B). The current "volatile and highly complex situation" means that Britain will face "major challenges" in maintaining public order.

Scientists warn that pandemic tensions are inextricably linked to structural inequalities and international events, and add that the military should be on standby to suppress a possible breakdown of law and order.

Professor Graham Medley pictured warned that "further intervention" might be needed to get students back to school next month as he suggested to ministers that pubs should be more important than schools

Prof. Medley said:

Prof. Medley said: "It could be a question of balancing, and then it's about setting priorities. Do we think pubs are more important than schools?"

Drinkers who crowded in front of a pub in Primrose Hill in north London last night seemed to pay little attention to social distancing

Drinkers who crowded in front of a pub in Primrose Hill in north London last night seemed to pay little attention to social distancing

On the hottest day of yesterday, many drinkers in Manchester enjoyed a beer outside of this city center pub

On the hottest day of yesterday, many drinkers in Manchester enjoyed a beer outside of this city center pub

Prof. Medley also claimed that the increase in coronavirus infections appeared to be in younger people, but warned that there was a risk that it could spread to other sections of the population.

He said: “The age distribution of infections has changed, it has moved to younger age groups, and so it is likely that we will not see this increase in hospitalization related to infections as we did in March.

"But the big fear is that the virus is getting out of control and we are getting into a situation where there is so much virus that it will inevitably spread to all sections of the population."

The sage paper's warning of unrest indicates that the scale of the violence could be worse than the notorious clashes in 2011, as the inequalities caused by the virus have "precariously balanced" the UK and the police are not ready is to deal with a large scale collapse of public order.

As a result, the military should be placed on standby, the experts argue.

The report also discussed the Black Lives Matter movement, which gained momentum in May and early June after George Floyd's death in the United States.

There is an increasing sense of "racial injustice, inequality and discrimination" among black, Asian and ethnic minorities who are disproportionately affected by the virus.

At the same time, the authors say that far-right groups are mobilizing to an extent that has not been seen for a decade and are exploiting fatal stabbing incidents in Reading, London and Glasgow.

The sage paper's warning of unrest suggests that the extent of the violence could be worse than the notorious 2011 clashes

The sage paper's warning of unrest suggests that the extent of the violence could be worse than the notorious 2011 clashes

Experts say the inequalities caused by the virus have made the UK "precariously balanced" and the police are unwilling to deal with a large-scale public policy collapse, as was seen in 2011

Experts say the inequalities caused by the virus have made the UK "precariously balanced" and the police are unwilling to deal with a large-scale public policy collapse, as was seen in 2011

Unrest such as was seen in the capital nine years ago could be triggered by anger at local locks that "overwhelm" any attempt to control the corona virus and could "catastrophically" undermine recovery plans

Unrest such as was seen in the capital nine years ago could be triggered by anger at local locks that "overwhelm" any attempt to control the corona virus and could "catastrophically" undermine recovery plans

Yesterday's announcement that the brakes were being used to relax the blockade came just a few hours before a number of companies reopened.

At a gloomy press conference on Downing Street, Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty warned that the country had "probably close to the border or borders" of what can be done to get back to normal for the time being.

He suggested that compromises be made when schools reopen in September, with some restrictions being reintroduced.

Families could be asked to avoid using public transport or to meet other households under one option.

By now, more than two million people who have protected themselves from the virus at home no longer have to isolate in most parts of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Professor Whitty warned: “We have probably reached the limit or limits of what we can do to open up society. The idea that we can open everything and keep the virus under control is clearly wrong.

"That may mean that if we want to do more in the future, we may have to do less of a few other things, and these will be difficult compromises."

“Some of these will be government decisions, and we all have to do that as citizens. But we have to be realistic, the idea that we can open everything and keep the virus under control is clearly wrong. & # 39;

The measures to be lifted today, including allowing small wedding receptions, reopening bowling alleys, and pilots at sporting events, have been delayed by at least two weeks.

Facewear will also be mandatory at more locations in England, including museums, galleries and places of worship, starting next Saturday – and wearing will be monitored more closely.

As yesterday's numbers show, there are now 4,900 new infections a day, up from 3,000 a day two weeks ago and 2,000 a day at the end of June.

After receiving gloomy infection rate data late Wednesday, Mr. Johnson is said to have called a meeting of his closest helpers on Thursday morning to work out a new battle plan.

The ministers, including Matt Hancock, Rishi Sunak and Michael Gove, and Professor Whitty, finalized the proposals later that evening.

In other developments:

  • The prime minister unveiled a new slogan – "hands, face, space" – to re-emphasize the rules of social distancing.
  • Mr. Johnson claimed that his efforts to get the workers back to the office remained unchanged, although a survey showed that thousands of officials are still working from home.
  • The Scots were asked not to visit parts of Northern England, with Nicola Sturgeon leading a "significant risk of infection".
  • Infection peaks have occurred in several other areas in the past 14 days.
  • Two million patients who have been screened since March are encouraged to return to normal life.
  • A leading provider said that nursing homes in England have been without regular virus tests for over a fortnight.

The ban on blocking people in Greater Manchester, parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire who hit other households indoors or in gardens was announced immediately. The other measures were confirmed yesterday.

Mr. Johnson warned that restrictions could become nationwide in areas of the northwest as infections continued to increase. He said, "If people don't follow the rules and behave safely, we may have to go further."

He also promised that the police would play a much bigger role in enforcing face mask rules and breaking up large gatherings.

But both the police federation, which represents ordinary officials, and the National Police Chiefs Association said they expected shopkeepers and councilors to enforce the rules in the first place.

John Apter, President of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said: “We know that the vast majority of the public will comply with it as the rules for wearing facewear are expanded. When people are not wearing blankets, we expect the site owner or local authority to advise and act. & # 39;

The numbers obtained from MailOnline show that the police only imposed 13 fines in June after masks were required for public transport.

The fateful press conference took place two weeks after Mr. Johnson said he hoped that all restrictions could be lifted by Christmas. In stark contrast, he said yesterday: "We cannot be complacent."

Boris Johnson announced yesterday that after increasing the number of coronavirus cases, he would press the brake pedal to ease the blockage

Boris Johnson announced yesterday that after increasing the number of coronavirus cases, he would press the brake pedal to ease the blockage

Tory MP triggers racism after claiming that the "vast majority" of lockdown violations come from BAME communities

A Tory MP was accused of racism yesterday after claiming that the "vast majority" who break the restrictions are from black and ethnic minorities.

Craig Whittaker, who represents the Calder Valley in West Yorkshire, said there are "parts of our community that just don't take the pandemic seriously."

He made the comments during an interview with LBC Radio after local blocking measures were imposed across much of the north, including his constituency.

When asked if his statement related to the Muslim community, he said, "Of course.

"If you look at the areas where we saw rises and falls, the vast majority – not all areas – of the BME communities are not taking this seriously enough."

He said to the briefing: “If we see this increase (in infection rates) around the world, we cannot be mistaken that we are liberated. We have to be ready to respond to the first signs of trouble.

"We now see a warning light on the dashboard. We believe that we should press the brake pedal to keep the virus under control. "

But he insisted that summer was not canceled and encouraged the public to "still think of wonderful stays here in the UK" – and said he hoped to take his own mini break at home.

He insisted that more employees return to the offices and said that the screening recommendation would be interrupted yesterday as planned.

However, the Prime Minister admitted that there may have to be "compromises" so that students can return to school, which is "a national priority".

Last night it was announced that government scientists had warned that the infection rate had to have "enough leeway" for schools to reopen safely.

The minutes of the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group Committee shows that on June 23, measures may need to be changed at the end of summer to keep R (the infection rate) below 1 while the planned reopening continues.

Yesterday, the Office for National Statistics warned of rising infection rates – for the first time since May.

Random tests indicate that 4,200 people are infected every day in England. Although most do not show up in daily test numbers because they never develop symptoms, they can transmit the virus. Yesterday, 880 tested positive – the highest daily number in a month.

Experts stressed that the situation was not as alarming as in the spring. And although officials are concerned about an increase in parts of the Northwest, where restrictions have been tightened on more than four million people, infection rates are still fairly low.

Blackburn, the UK's worst hotspot, has a weekly average of 83 cases per 100,000 people, which has decreased over the past week.

Public Health England has identified six locations as "problem areas", including Northampton and Eden, Cumbria. Swindon in Wiltshire has also seen a worrying surge.

The UK Chamber of Commerce said the end of easing was a blow to companies trying to get back on their feet.

Industry leaders from the harried hospitality industry described it as "devastating" for pubs, restaurants and resorts across the UK.

Mr Johnson's announcement also coincided with a 65 point dip in the FTSE as investor confidence fluctuated from uncertainty.

Claire Walker, Co-Executive Director of the UK Chamber of Commerce, said today: "While addressing the public health emergency must be a priority, these short-term announcements will add to the confidence of businesses and consumers at a time when there were many businesses, hard to hit I'm just getting back on my feet.

“Corporations need as much clarity from the government as possible if they plan ahead and plan to do business again in the coming months.

“Ministers also need to consider extending support to all companies, many of which will be forced to close for an even longer period, and taking targeted measures to help companies that are closed.

Plans to allow wedding receptions for up to 30 people in England have been delayed, as have reopening of close contact services such as beauticians, ice rinks and a pilot to bring the crowd back to the sports venues. Shielding measures are still being eased, however, while workers continue to be asked to return to the office next month

Plans to allow wedding receptions for up to 30 people in England have been delayed, as have reopening of close contact services such as beauticians, ice rinks and a pilot to bring the crowd back to the sports venues. Shielding measures are still being eased, however, while workers continue to be asked to return to the office next month

Boris Johnson unveils the government's latest Covid slogan

Boris Johnson asked people to remember the slogan "hands, face, space" when fighting Covid-19.

The Prime Minister admitted that it was important to keep the Council as simple as possible.

It comes after the government has been accused of creating confusion over new rules that were passed late Thursday for parts of Northern England.

Mr. Johnson said today, “The only real tool we can use to control the spread of this new virus is human behavior, and the only way to encourage people to behave in one way or another is that Consultation.

“And for you to be absolutely right, we have to keep it as simple as possible, and therefore, to get to the point, it means: hands, face, space.

“Wash your hands, cover your face in the settings we mentioned, and keep your distance from people you don't know. You come into contact with them for the first time and of course get a test and self-isolation if you have symptoms.

"I hope that was nice … you know, that was pretty punchy, I think – hands, face, space and a test.

"I think everyone can more or less remember it."

Mr. Johnson and his government have often tried to use snappy phrases to convey their messages.

In March people were told to wash their hands while singing happy birthday, while the "stay at home" message was used in the early months of the pandemic before being dropped off for "stay vigilant".

In the meantime, Mr. Johnson also said that despite the progress made in fighting the virus, the UK cannot believe that it is exempt from an increase in cases.

He said: “I have also warned time and time again that this virus could return and that we would not hesitate to take quick and decisive action if necessary.

“I fear that the virus is gaining momentum in parts of Asia and Latin America and that some of our European friends are also having difficulty keeping it under control.

“When we see these ascents all over the world, we cannot pretend that we are liberated. We have to be ready to respond to the first signs of trouble. & # 39;

UK Hospitality called on the government to provide more business support after it became known that the measures to be canceled today, including small wedding receptions and the reopening of bowling alleys and casinos, had been postponed for at least two weeks.

Managing Director Kate Nicholls said: “We understand that safety is a priority, but it is still devastating news for the hospitality industry.

“They have spent a lot of time and money that they can hardly afford at the moment to prepare for the reopening. The security of their jobs remains uncertain for the people who work in these sectors.

& # 39; We now need clear communication to ensure that consumer confidence is not further harmed.

& # 39; We will also need further support for those companies that cannot reopen. Full vacation ends today and companies that remain closed will need help to protect jobs and keep their business going. & # 39;

And Matthew Fell, chief executive of the Confederation of British Industry in the UK, said: “This news will be a real disappointment to some companies, but companies know that public safety is paramount. Companies will continue to do what is necessary to avoid a spike in infection.

& # 39; Delayed reopening will unfortunately result in even greater financial pressure for some companies. As a result, there may still be a need for more direct support to support cash flow, including increased relief on business rates. & # 39;

The announcements came after the government announced yesterday evening that 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire would be partially banned to prohibit mixing with other households indoors or in a garden, because of the increasing number of cases.

The decision to initiate the action at midnight prompted the community leaders to accuse the government "A terrible abuse of power" because it came at the beginning of the oath celebrations. Mr Johnson apologized this afternoon for the disruption that the new restrictions will cause when he returned to "possibly in time for Christmas" just a few weeks after saying he wanted to normalize life in the UK.

He said: Given this increasing number (of cases), our assessment is that we should press the brake pedal now to keep the virus under control.

& # 39; On Saturday August 1st, we hoped to reopen a number of higher-risk hires in England that remained closed. I'm afraid we're postponing these changes today (yesterday) by at least a fortnight.

"That means that until August 15th, the earliest casinos, bowling alleys, ice rinks and the remaining close contact services must remain closed, indoor appearances will not be resumed, pilots of larger crowds will not take place in sports facilities and conference centers, and wedding receptions of up to 30 People are not allowed, but ceremonies can of course continue to take place according to Covid's security guidelines.

He added: "I know that the steps we take will be a severe blow to many people, anyone whose wedding plans have been disrupted or who are unable to take the oath now as they would wish, and do so I'm really very sorry but we just can't take the risk. & # 39;

Mr. Johnson said the extension of the legally enforceable obligation to wear a face covering will apply from August 8. In England, face masks are currently only required in shops and public transport.

He said, "We will extend the requirement to wear face covering to other interiors where you are likely to come into contact with people you don't normally meet, such as museums, galleries, cinemas, and places of worship."

The Prime Minister said that "most people in this country follow the rules," but he asked Interior Minister Priti Patel to "work with the police and others to ensure that the rules that were already in place were properly enforced."

He added, "It means a greater police presence to ensure that face coverings are worn when required by law."

Despite the increase in infections, Mr. Johnson said that plans to move work away from home remain "unchanged" as workers are still encouraged to return to their desks in August.

And he also encouraged the British to take stays and said he hoped to enjoy one himself. "I will be working flat out as you can imagine, although I may be able to add a short stay to the agenda if possible," he said.

Government statistics yesterday admitted that "there is now enough evidence" to prove that Covid-19 infections are on the rise and that 4,200 people will contract the virus every day in England alone

Government statistics yesterday admitted that "there is now enough evidence" to prove that Covid-19 infections are on the rise and that 4,200 people will contract the virus every day in England alone

Blackburn with Darwen – the country's worst-affected agency – will be subject to the new rules, as will Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees and all of Greater Manchester

Crowds in Brighton: When Boris made the announcement, crowds of thousands of beachgoers flocked to Brighton to enjoy the sun while the city asked them to stay away. It is the fourth hottest day ever recorded in England with 100F temperatures

Crowds in Brighton: When Boris made the announcement, crowds of thousands of beachgoers flocked to Brighton to enjoy the sun while the city asked them to stay away. It is the fourth hottest day ever recorded in England with 100F temperatures

"A blow to the business": Boris & # 39; sudden braking will destroy the UK economy and cost more jobs, experts say as the FTSE 100 drops 1.2%, 72 points, to 5,918

Business leaders yesterday warned that Boris Johnson, who postponed further easing the blockade of the English corona virus, was a "hammer blow" to the economy.

The UK Chambers of Commerce said business and consumer confidence will be damaged again after the Prime Minister warned the UK that it could not be complacent given the increasing prevalence of Covid-19 in local communities.

The FTSE 100 index of leading British companies was up 72 points, or 1.2 percent, to 5,918 in London this afternoon, after initially rising 6,043 this morning.

In another blow to the economy, British Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty warned that it might not be possible to further loosen the ban.

Claire Walker, Co-Executive Director of the UK Chamber of Commerce, said today: "While addressing the public health emergency must be a priority, these short-term announcements will add to the confidence of businesses and consumers at a time when there were many businesses, hard to hit I'm just getting back on my feet.

“Corporations need as much clarity from the government as possible if they plan ahead and plan to do business again in the coming months.

“Ministers also need to consider extending support to all companies, many of which will be forced to close for an even longer period, and taking targeted measures to help companies that are closed.

UKHospitality called on the government to provide more business support after it became known that today’s measures, including small wedding receptions and the reopening of bowling alleys and casinos, had been postponed for at least two weeks.

Managing Director Kate Nicholls said: “We understand that safety is a priority, but it is still devastating news for the hospitality industry.

“They have spent a lot of time and money that they can hardly afford at the moment to prepare for the reopening. The security of their jobs remains uncertain for the people who work in these sectors.

Mr Johnson had previously been accused of "disregarding British Muslims" after the government announced its decision to block Northern England last night.

Mohammed Shafiq of the Ramadhan Foundation said the move to ban 4.5 million people for at least a week will ruin the plans for thousands to celebrate the religious festival in Manchester, East Lancashire and West Yorkshire by Monday evening.

Health minister Matt Hancock was forced this morning to deny that he had targeted Oath when he announced the Covid 19 restrictions when the religious holiday was about to begin.

Mr. Shafiq said, “When the government announced that families had already traveled to their relatives' homes on Twitter, people had already started preparing for their oath. Making this decision on social media regardless of British Muslims is a terrible abuse of their power and shows how far they are from society. I condemn the announcement and hope you learned a great lesson from it. "

Labor Bolton MP Yasmin Qureshi said today: "It is irresponsible for the government to make a major public health announcement in a hurry on the eve of Eid Al Adha (on Twitter) without clarity or guidance."

But on Friday, a tory with a constituency on the fringes of the exclusion zone accused "BAME communities of not taking this seriously enough" as more and more coronavirus cases have occurred in cities with large Muslim populations and minorities such as Blackburn, Rochdale and Bradford.

Craig Whittaker, Calder Valley MP in West Yorkshire, told LBC: “If you look at the areas where we've seen rises and falls, the vast majority – but by no means all areas – is the BAME communities that don't take seriously enough.

“We have areas with high occupancy rates – when several families live in one household. It doesn't have to be specific to the Asian community, but that's the biggest part. Look at the areas. You have Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees. Bradford and Kirklees have two of the largest populations in West Yorkshire.

When asked if he was referring to the immigrant population, he said, "Immigrants and Asian people."

The health minister defended yesterday's surprising announcement to fight the surge in coronavirus cases in the region, which he made in a series of tweets at 9:15 p.m. – less than three hours before the rules came into effect.

Residents throughout Greater Manchester, Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle, Rossendale, Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees are no longer allowed to mix with other households indoors or in a garden to reduce Covid-19 infections.

But people can still visit pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, and places of worship as long as they are people they live with and avoid interacting with others outside of their bladder.

Police officers condemn Boris' order to enforce the mask of the "absolutely crazy" mask and social distancing and call it an "impossible" task

Boris Johnson's call to the police to enforce the mandatory wearing of masks indoors was yesterday called "bonkers" by officials.

The prime minister promised a "greater police presence" after it emerged that officials last month fined only 13 people in a two-week period for not wearing a face mask in public transport.

He said that masks must be worn in galleries, cinemas and places of worship, as well as in shops and on trains and buses, while he insists that the police must ensure that the rules are observed.

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, which represents ordinary officials, told MailOnline that the new policy was "impossible" to enforce.

He said, "They want us to enforce the new rules in these other places now, but there may be a pub or restaurant next door where people don't have to wear a mask.

"It doesn't make sense, it's absolutely crazy.

"How do you want us to enforce it in places of worship? It is impossible. We only switch from one thing to another almost every hour and it always becomes a problem for the police.

“When you go to big stores, you might see people with masks, but in the small shops on the main street, people just walk in and out without them, and it will be that way.

"We cannot enforce that. It has to be a collective social effort, we have to do it all together. They lose the will of the police and the public to do what they expect us to do.

Ordinary officers will wonder if they are set up for abuse only. We have demonstrations all over London this weekend, but as far as I know, you still can't meet in groups of more than 30 people.

The measures will be reviewed in a week, said Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham.

Mr. Hancock was asked yesterday whether the rules are aimed at preventing families from meeting for Eid al-Adha, an Islamic festival that will take place until Monday evening. There is a large Muslim population in the northwest. He told the BBC: & # 39; No. My heart goes out to the Muslim communities in these areas because I know the importance of celebrating oaths. & # 39;

There's trouble because the strict restrictions were announced on social media just 165 minutes before the block began. Many people in the zone are unlikely to know that the new blockage even started when they woke up this morning.

Union leader Keir Starmer criticized the move as "a new low for government communications during the crisis," while shadow business secretary Lucy Powell, MP from Manchester Central, described it as "a disaster." "Since there is no one who can answer some of the basic questions, I don't think this is the right way to build trust, take people with you, and maximize compliance with those steps," she added.

There is also confusion because in three areas, such as Rossendale, three confirmed cases of coronavirus have never occurred on any day since early July. In Trafford, Greater Manchester, there were about ten cases a day in a district with 236,370 residents, and infections are "very low" despite a small increase in cases, officials said this week.

Local MP William Wragg said: “Greater Manchester is not a homogeneous area. We always have to be on the safe side, but treating 10 districts equally is not the right approach. & # 39;

The tops in Oldham and Blackburn with Darwen were both driven by rising rates among Asian communities, city councilors said. Arooj Shah, vice-chair of the Oldham Council, confirmed that cases have increased in Oldham's Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities, which account for up to two-thirds of all cases in the city of Manchester.

85 percent of the new Covid-19 infections in Blackburn with Darwen were people with a South Asian heritage, who also make up around a fifth of the population of the community. Around 20 percent of Oldham's population comes from Bangladesh and Pakistan, compared to the average of 2.8 percent in England and Wales.

Mr. Hancock admitted yesterday that the government in Oldham and Blackburn had planned more targeted, more specific local measures, but found that the coronavirus was "spreading", so we had to take the measures we took.

He said, "The reason is that we have seen these increases across Greater Manchester and in the other affected areas."

The new closure means that in nine areas of the north:

  • It is now illegal for people who do not live together to meet in a private home or garden.
  • But people can still go to pubs, restaurants, cafes, shops, places of worship, community centers, leisure and entertainment venues, or visitor attractions with their household or support bubble.
  • Going to work is permitted, and civil marriage weddings and ceremonies in these areas can continue to take place. No more than 30 people should participate and it must be in a Covid-safe place.
People wearing face masks have their temperatures checked before being allowed to go to the Manchester Central Mosque this morning to worship because the city and much of the northwest have been closed

People wearing face masks have their temperatures checked before being allowed to go to the Manchester Central Mosque this morning to worship because the city and much of the northwest have been closed

Matt Hancock denied yesterday that he was targeting last-minute oath celebrations to introduce strict new blocking restrictions. Pictured: The temperature of a man with a face mask is checked before he is allowed to enter the Manchester Central Mosque

Matt Hancock denied yesterday that he was targeting last-minute oath celebrations to introduce strict new blocking restrictions. Pictured: The temperature of a man with a face mask is checked before he is allowed to enter the Manchester Central Mosque

The new measures affect 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire (Manchester Central Mosque this morning).

The new measures affect 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire (Manchester Central Mosque this morning).

The decision to impose a short-term ban has caused a lot of trouble for members of the zone - and many are confused by the rules

The decision to impose a short-term ban has caused a lot of trouble for members of the zone – and many are confused by the rules

The coronavirus infection rate doubled in England in July

Coronavirus cases in England are now at their highest since May, and government scientists are no longer confident that the crucial R rate is below the feared one level.

Government statistics yesterday admitted that "there is now enough evidence" to prove that Covid-19 infections are on the rise and that 4,200 people will contract the virus every day in England alone.

The National Statistics Office's estimate, which measures the size of the outbreak by wiping thousands of people, has doubled since the end of June and is 68 percent higher than 2,500 two weeks ago.

One in 1,500 people currently have the corona virus – 0.07 percent of the population.

However, experts believe that the rate in London is twice as high and is still increasing. Nursing homes and hospitals are not included in this figure.

The move came out of fears that the UK is heading for a second wave following an increase in infections in European countries such as Spain, Belgium, Luxembourg and Croatia.

Mr Johnson warned of a resurgence yesterday when the UK reported the highest daily total number of Covid 19 cases in over a month. There were 846 new infections, the largest number since June 28, when there were 901.

Hancock announced the new regional blockade last night and said, “The measures we have taken in parts of Northern England where we can see the number of cases increasing is about ensuring people's safety.

“What we saw is one of the reasons for this increase that households are gathering and ignoring the rules of social distance.

“So we have to act decisively and say that two households cannot meet indoors because this way we can help stop the virus from spreading. We can see a second high point in parts of Europe, so we took some of the measures we had to take. & # 39;

Shadow Secretary of State Lucy Powell described the way the government announced the new corona virus restrictions for parts of northern England as a "disaster".

On Times Radio, the Manchester Central MP said: "I think the announcement two hours before it takes effect is a breeze out of the blue.

"Since there is nobody to answer some of the basic questions, I don't think this is the right way to build trust, take people with you, and maximize compliance with those steps."

She said she was "not wiser" about the data that led to widespread restrictions in parts of Northern England, including in her own constituency.

"As a Member of Parliament, I follow the data very closely and I'm still not sure which data triggered this action so quickly in such a wide area," she said.

“If we had a much better track and trace system, we would be able to recognize the localized nature or the place where these transmissions actually take place much more clearly and more localized than would act across a wide area.

"We still get back less than 50% of the tests in 24 hours, and frankly that's just not good enough."

"There are a lot of questions here, and I don't know what data has changed so significantly in the past few days that it needs to take such widespread action, and I think I should know that."

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer criticized ministers for making the announcement shortly before 10 p.m. and on social media. He said: "The announcement of measures that potentially affect millions of people late at night on Twitter is a new low for government communications during this crisis."

Matt Hancock was grilled on Friday morning on BBC Radio 4 Today about the latest restrictions in the northwest and the decision to announce them last night at eleven o'clock.

Mr. Hancock defended the move and said: “If the Labor leadership in London don't believe that people in the north of England can follow social distance rules when they announce it, they are wrong.

“People largely stick to the rules when we introduce them, and we have to make changes because we're trying to fight a virus that spreads through social contact.

"One of the sad things about this virus is that it lives on the kind of social contact that we all love and that makes life worth living."

When asked whether the spikes were triggered in cases where people were confused, what they could do after the lock was released, and what they couldn't do, Mr. Hancock seemed to admit that the rules were no longer clear.

He said, "Well, we're bringing in more advertising to explain exactly what people need to do and to make it clear that the basics are still incredibly important – washing your hands, using facewear, and social distancing – and when you get symptoms must get a test. & # 39;

The health minister said the government had not closed any pubs or recommended that people in the northwest work from home again, as data showed that the "spread between households who visit each other and people who have family and friends." visit ”.

Mr. Hancock added, “One of the characteristics of this pandemic is that we in government have to make decisions quickly and then announce them quickly so that people can know about them.

"We did this with the local authorities, with local public health officials and with them about how we do it."

There were further concerns that the restrictions – which affect areas with large Muslim populations – were announced hours before the Eid al-Adha celebration began. Many compared it to canceling Christmas on Christmas Eve at 10 p.m.

When asked whether the late announcement was made last night to block the oath celebrations, Mr. Hancock said "No". He added: “My heart goes out to the Muslim communities in these areas and I know how important Eid celebrations are.

"I am very grateful to local Muslim leaders across the country who have worked so hard to find a way to host Covid-safe celebrations, such as celebrating oath in parks where more space is available, and Of course, outside is safer than inside. & # 39;

The Minister of Health was then asked why meeting friends and families in outdoor gardens is prohibited. He said: “Parks and public outdoor areas are the safest option because a lot of people have to go through a house to go into a garden and then you get more complicated rules. I think it's just a human tendency to get closer when you're at home. & # 39;

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer criticized the ministers for making the announcement shortly before 10 p.m. and on social media and described it as a "new low" for government communications

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer criticized the ministers for making the announcement shortly before 10 p.m. and on social media and described it as a "new low" for government communications

Public Health England data released last week - the most recently available - showed how infection rates have changed in the country's 10 most affected authorities

Public Health England data released last week – the most recently available – showed how infection rates have changed in the country's 10 most affected authorities

Are the cases in the northwest really on the rise?

Coronavirus cases are declining in an area of ​​Greater Manchester, although restrictions apply to the entire region.

Official NHS statistics show that infection rates in Rochdale have dropped 44 percent in the past week.

All nine other boroughs – Bolton, Stockport, Tameside, Oldham, Trafford, Salford, Bury, Wigan and the city of Manchester – have been hit by an increase in outbreaks.

Local Tory MP William Wragg said it was "not the right approach" to treat all 10 counties equally.

Stockport, home to 290,000 people, saw the largest increase in Covid 19 cases between July 21-27 – the latest data.

Fifty-five people were diagnosed with the disease across the community. This corresponds to a rate of 18.9 cases per 100,000 people – 150 percent more than in the previous week.

Trafford rose 94 percent to 39.3 percent and Oldham's quota rose 90 percent to 57.3 percent over the course of a week. This made Trafford the second most affected authority in England.

Wigan also saw a 127 percent increase in the past week – but the infection rate is much lower, and is currently 7.7 cases per 100,000 people.

In the cities of Manchester (27.2), Bury (16.3), Tameside (16.0) and Salford (22.4), infection rates rose by 60 to 80 percent.

Bolton's rate rose 12 percent to 16.8.

The weekly rate in Rochdale – currently the seventh most affected area in England – fell to 27.3.

WHAT ABOUT LANCASHIRE AND YORKSHIRE?

Health chiefs only provide ongoing weekly infection data for England's top local authorities, which are often district councils.

This means that it is not possible to see outbreaks increase in smaller regions unless the local health bosses publish the data they have.

For example, figures show that the cases in Blackburn with Darwen (down 9 percent to 83.3), which acts as a single agency, are still declining slightly.

But other parts of the county that are affected by the restriction restrictions – Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle and Rossendale – are all covered by the Lancashire bracket.

The infection rate in Lancashire is currently 10.9 to 6 percent below last week's rate.

However, local newspapers have reported that infection rates in Pendle and Hyndburn are close to 40.

Bradford – one of the three areas in West Yorkshire affected by Matt Hancock's tough new measures – saw cases increase by 1 percent. The data show that the infection rate is now 45.8.

Calderdale & # 39; s has risen 64 percent to 36.7. But the rate in Kirklees has dropped 23 percent to 20.5.

All three boroughs are currently among the worst dozen authorities in England.

Leisure leaders, however, criticized the government's "appalling last-minute" decision to postpone the reopening of venues such as casinos and bowling alleys without providing scientific evidence.

The sudden changes, which mean that many indoor leisure facilities will no longer be able to reopen on August 1, as expected, were announced by Boris Johnson on Friday afternoon.

Simon Thomas, founder and CEO of Hippodrome Casino in Leicester Square, central London, said that the "ridiculous" decision would have both financial and emotional implications for the business.

"It's a terrible last minute decision," he said.

& # 39; We will reopen in 12 hours and reopening such a business is a complex process that requires weeks of preparation.

“We fired more than 450 employees while the building was prepared and everything was filled.

"The investment was probably about half a million pounds just to get the building up and running."

The six-story Hippodrome Casino spans 80,000 square meters and employs 750 people to run its bars, restaurants, and game days.

"It's not just about turning on the lights," said Mr. Thomas.

"The Hippodrome is the largest entertainment venue in the West End in London. It is huge and now costs a lot of money."

Mr. Thomas said the casino "burned £ 1 million a month" while it was closed, adding that there would be a great emotional response to the news.

"Many of my employees have been absent for months. They have retrained, cleaned, prepared and brought back in the past two weeks. That gave them an emotional boost," he said.

& # 39; The disappointment here is profound, and we also have thousands of customers who are all excited to be able to return to a place they enjoy and are now very disappointed.

"I definitely think it's a ridiculous decision … there is no evidence that casinos are at higher risk than many of the sectors that have already reopened."

Other companies in the leisure sector were also frustrated by the apparent lack of scientific evidence to keep their doors closed.

Stephen Burns, executive director of the Hollywood Bowl Group bowling chain, said the news was "incredibly disappointing and unexpected."

"There is absolutely no scientific evidence that bowling is less safe than other activities that can be reopened and left open," he said.

& # 39; We have taken all possible precautions to ensure that our customers can create social distance in our spacious centers with extensive hygiene protocols.

"Hearing this last minute message is devastating for our team members and customers looking forward to returning."

The regional ban prohibits meeting another household indoors at home, and the police are empowered to enforce this.

Pubs and restaurants remain open, but customers are advised not to visit them with people they do not live with. However, the police are not believed to have enforcement powers if they refuse.

The current rules for England in general state that two households can meet indoors – even in a pub or restaurant – but should not touch.

Official data shows that coronavirus cases are declining in an area of ​​Greater Manchester, although restrictions apply to the entire region.

According to NHS statistics, infection rates in Rochdale have dropped 44 percent in the past week.

All nine other boroughs – Bolton, Stockport, Tameside, Oldham, Trafford, Salford, Bury, Wigan and the city of Manchester – have been hit by an increase in outbreaks.

Local Tory MP William Wragg said it was "not the right approach" to treat all 10 counties equally.

Mr. Hancock said regional measures were imposed after a meeting of the Local Action Gold Committee, which includes Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty, senior officials from the Department of Health and Public Health in England, and some ministers and senior officials.

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said: "I ask all Greater Manchester residents - young and old - to protect each other by respecting these new requirements."

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said: "I ask all Greater Manchester residents – young and old – to protect each other by respecting these new requirements."

He later tweeted a list of what he "understood" by the new measures

He later tweeted a list of what he "understood" by the new measures

Which places in England now have stricter Covid 19 restrictions?

The following locations have restrictions that differ from those across England.

Oldham, Greater Manchester

Tuesday July 28th

  • The residents are told that they cannot have "social visitors" in their home.
  • People must be two meters away from friends and family when they see them outside, and avoid hugging and shaking hands.
  • Nursing homes will not relax visiting restrictions to protect the elderly and vulnerable.

Friday July 31

  • Vulnerable and elderly people who have shielded were asked to do so for two more weeks.

Blackburn with Darwen

Tuesday July 14th

  • Five new measures have been introduced for all residents; Reducing the number of home visits to two; Encouraging residents to wear a face mask in all closed public spaces; Encourage people to be tested; Ask people to just push your elbows instead of shaking hands. Intensify advice and support for small businesses to ensure their security.

Saturday July 25th

  • The Department of Health announced that Secretary of Health Matt Hancock will sign new regulations to exempt Blackburn from changes to the national ban – the opening of gyms, pools, and other sports and exercise facilities.

Leicester

Monday June 29th

  • People were asked to adhere to stricter barring restrictions in a "local ban" for at least two weeks.
  • Non-material transactions were asked to close after the reopening on June 15th.
  • The city's bars, restaurants, and hairdressers didn't open as planned on July 4th.

Thursday July 16

  • Health Minister of Health Matt Hancock announced that the blockade in Leicester City would remain in effect for two weeks. This meant that the measures introduced in the rest of England to open the hospitality industry in Leicester would not apply.

Saturday July 18th

  • Additional restriction restrictions ended on July 18 in Charnwood and Blaby. These areas have returned to the national guidelines on social distancing.
  • In Leicester City and the boroughs of Oadby and Wigston, shops, schools and educational institutions that are no longer necessary can now be reopened. Single households can still form a support bubble with another household. People can still meet in a group of up to six people and only outdoors if they follow strict social distances.

Luton

Thursday July 23

  • All residents were asked to keep a distance of two meters from people outside their home at all times. Where this is not possible, a face mask must be worn in "all closed public spaces".
  • The residents were told not to make social visits to other people's homes or private gardens. When socializing with others, they must do so outside in an open space or park.
  • Large group meetings should exceed a maximum of six people (unless they live in the same house).

Friday July 31

  • Luton has been removed as an intervention area, meaning that gyms, swimming pools, and gyms that had to be closed can be open from the week of August 3.
  • Those who shielded were asked to continue until August 17th, but with slightly changed guidelines that will be communicated to them by letter or phone.

The closure extends over a much larger area than that of Leicester, which was imposed on June 29 and will be relaxed from Monday.

Pubs, cafes, bars and restaurants will reopen in the closed city on August 3, Labor MP Liz Kendall said last night.

People can also go on vacation with their own household, but leisure centers, gyms and pools remain closed.

Andy Burnham, the Greater Manchester Mayor, urged the locals to abide by the new rules.

He said: “In the past few days, the picture in Greater Manchester regarding the spread of Covid-19 has changed significantly.

“We have gone from a falling rate in almost all of our boroughs over the past week to a rising rate in nine out of ten affected communities in a much larger geographic area.

In Rochdale, the district where the falls fell, they are still too high.

“We have always said that we will remain vigilant and ready to respond quickly if necessary.

In line with this approach, I have agreed with the Minister of Health that it is right to act on a precautionary basis and now introduce modest measures to reduce the rate of new infections.

“I ask all Greater Manchester residents – young and old – to protect each other by respecting these new requirements. They are checked weekly; That is, the more we stick to them, the faster they will be removed.

“This is a place that is proud to take care of each other. We must remain true to this now by not acting selfishly and keeping an eye on the health of others at all times. & # 39;

However, Labor criticized the timing and manner of Mr. Hancock's announcement.

Sir Keir Starmer noted that when Downing Street closed its daily virus briefings in June, the ministers promised to continue holding conferences for "important announcements".

"It is difficult to imagine what could be more important," he said.

Sir Keir went on Twitter and added: “Nobody would argue to take local action to reduce the transmission of coronaviruses.

"But the announcement of measures that may affect millions of people on Twitter late at night is a new low for government communications during this crisis."

“Despite all the turmoil, the government has failed to provide a functioning track and trace system that would recognize local flares like this.

"The people of Greater Manchester now desperately need clarity and explanations from the government – and there needs to be adequate support for the businesses and people affected by the ban."

Tottenham Labor MP David Lammy added: “The government's Shambolic announcement to take local blocking measures on Twitter tonight is the result of the total failure to deliver the promised track and trace system to the country.

"Boris Johnson is sleeping at the wheel."

The first Scottish minister Nicola Sturgeon said the decision was the "right one".

She tweeted: “The UK government is right to act quickly if it believes the situation justifies it.

& # 39; But this is a sharp reminder that the threat from this virus is still very real. Please follow all FACTS advice and stay safe. & # 39;

Mr Johnson yesterday asked the UK not to be mistaken that the pandemic was over when he warned of up to 30 locations where outbreaks "bubbled".

During a visit to North Yorkshire, Mr. Johnson said that if the virus made a "harmful" comeback, there would be "real ramifications" that would jeopardize the economic recovery.

His cautious message came when Mr. Hancock warned that there was a "second wave across Europe" and that the country "must do everything in our power to prevent it from reaching our coasts".

When asked whether his statements risk hysteria at a time when infection rates in the UK are still well below their peak, Hancock told Radio 4 Today: "I am the Secretary of Health amid a global pandemic, So you apologize for worrying about the health of the British people and that is absolutely in my head.

Ministers were warned yesterday that the hysteria over the re-emergence of the virus would not be fueled. Labor MP Chris Bryant said: “It makes me so angry that the government is so easy with its language. There is no second wave in all of Europe. & # 39;

Mr. Johnson is also under pressure within his own party not to panic about the rise in infection rates.

By the end of May, England had the highest relative mortality of 21 European countries compared to the Office for National Statistics. However, the worst affected nations were Italy and Spain, which suffered the greatest peaks

By the end of May, England had the highest relative mortality of 21 European countries compared to the Office for National Statistics. However, the worst affected nations were Italy and Spain, which suffered the greatest peaks

Do I have to cancel my wedding? Can I still celebrate oath? Your questions were answered when 4.5 million people in Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Yorkshire were affected by a new lock

What has the government announced?

Health Minister Matt Hancock said last night that people from different households in Greater Manchester, parts of East Lancashire and West Yorkshire will be banned from midnight onwards in their homes and gardens.

Which areas are affected?

The new restrictions apply to the entire Greater Manchester area, parts of East Lancashire, including Blackburn with Darwen, Burnley, Hyndburn, Pendle and Rossendale, and Bradford, Calderdale and Kirklees in West Yorkshire.

The same restrictions apply to Leicester, where the first so-called “local lock” was imposed on June 29.

What does this mean for the people living there?

The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) said the new measures will mean that people in these areas should not mix with other households outside of those in their support bubbles in private homes or gardens.

Households can go to bars, pubs and other restaurants, but two households shouldn't go together, the department added.

The DHSC announced that the restrictions currently in place in Blackburn that indoor pools, gyms and dance studios, gyms and sports facilities will remain closed will continue to apply.

Why is this done?

In a series of tweets, Mr. Hancock said that there was an increasing transmission rate in parts of Northern England.

He said this was due to the fact that "households are gathering and do not follow the social distance rules" and the new rules were being introduced to "protect the country".

How are the restrictions enforced?

The government said it would sign new regulations to make the changes "legally enforceable" and give local authorities and police forces powers to enforce these restrictions.

How quickly does the virus spread?

According to the latest figures from Public Health England (PHE), the infection rate is increasing in 13 of the 19 municipalities in the areas where the new measures are being introduced.

In Blackburn with Darwen, the rate increased from 83.3 cases per 100,000 people in the seven days to July 20 to 89.3 in the seven days to July 27. A total of 133 new cases were registered.

Leicester has the second highest 7-day rate, although it has dropped from 67.8 per 100,000 population to 60.2 over the same period, with 214 new cases.

During the same period, the rate also rose in Manchester, Burnley, Pendle, Bradford, Calderdale, Oldham, Bury, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan, but fell in Hyndburn, Rossendale, Kirklees, Bolton and Rochdale.

Rochdale, Oldham, Blackburn and Pendle were on a PHE watchlist as "problem areas" after increased infection rates.

What is going on in Leicester?

The DHSC announced that restaurants, cafes, bars and hairdressers in Leicester can be reopened on Monday to ease restrictions across the rest of the country on July 4th.

Leisure centers, gyms and pools will remain closed, but cinemas and museums will open and religious ceremonies can take place, he added.

The department said all local restrictions currently in place in the neighboring neighborhoods of Oadby and Wigston will end.

But Mr. Hancock said that the social gathering restrictions imposed on Greater Manchester, East Lancashire and West Yorkshire would also apply to the city of Leicester.

Does my household have close family members?

Your household – as defined by law – consists only of the people you live with. If you have formed a support bubble (which must include a single adult household, i.e. single people or single parents with dependent children under the age of 18), they can be treated as if they were members of your household.

What will be illegal?

It is illegal for people who do not live together to meet in a private household or garden, with the exception of the limited exceptions set by law. You should not take in or visit people you do not live with unless they are in your support bubble. If you live in the affected areas, you should not visit someone's house or garden, regardless of whether they are inside or outside the restricted area.

Can I still meet people in my support bubble indoors?

Yes. If individuals from single adult households (single persons or single parents with dependent children under the age of 18) have formed a support bubble with another household, they can continue to visit each other, stay overnight and visit other public places as if they were a Household.

Can I still meet people outside?

According to national guidelines, you can still meet in groups of up to six people in public outdoor areas, unless the group only includes people from two households. You cannot meet people who do not live in a private garden.

You should always distance yourself socially from people you don't live with, unless they are in your support bubble.

I live in this area. Can I still meet with my family and friends to celebrate my oath?

Due to the higher infection rates, you should not host or visit friends and family in each other's houses or gardens in this area. This will soon be illegal unless there are special exceptions. You shouldn't meet friends and family in any other place, including restaurants or cafes.

Up to two households or six people from any number of households can meet outdoors (except in the people's gardens), where the risk of infection is lower. If you do this, you should still distance yourself socially from those you don't live with and avoid physical contact.

You can visit a mosque or other place or worship where Covid-19's safe guidance applies, but you need to distance yourself socially from people outside your household. This means that a distance of 2 meters or 1 meter with weakening (e.g. wearing face coverings) is maintained. At this time, we recommend holding outdoor prayer / worship services if possible.

Can I still go to work in this area?

Yes. People living inside and outside of this area can continue to enter and leave for work. Workplaces must implement the safe instructions from Covid-19.

I live in this area. Can I still go to cafes, restaurants, the gym, and other public places?

Yes. However, you should only go with members of your own household – even if you are outside the restricted area.

I live in the area. Can people from outside the restricted area visit me in my house?

No, it will be illegal.

Do I still need to shield myself when I live in this area?

Clinically extremely vulnerable people will no longer need to follow protection guidelines from August 1st unless they live in Blackburn with Darwen in the North West and other locally affected areas across England where the protection measures continue.

Can I visit a nursing home?

You should not visit friends or family in nursing homes, except in exceptional cases. Nursing homes should limit visits to these circumstances.

Can I still have my wedding if it is in the restricted area?

Weddings and civil marriages can still take place in these areas. No more than 30 people should participate in a marriage or partnership, where this can be safely housed in a safe place by COVID-19 with social distancing. You can find more information here.

No major wedding receptions or celebrations should be taking place at the moment, and any celebration after the ceremony should follow the more general social distancing policy, which involves no more than two households in one place or outdoors up to six people from different households.

Can I travel outside the restricted area to attend a wedding ceremony?

Yes.

Can I travel to the restricted area to attend a wedding ceremony?

Yes. Weddings should be limited to a maximum of 30 people and be subject to the COVID-19 Secure guidelines.

People who live outside the restricted areas can travel to the areas to attend a wedding, but should not go to a private home or garden.

Can I still visit a place of worship in the restricted area?

Yes, but you need to distance yourself socially from people outside your household. This means maintaining a distance of 2 meters or 1 meter with attenuations (e.g. face coverings). At this time, we recommend that prayer / worship be held outdoors if possible.

Can funerals still take place in the restricted areas?

Yes. Funerals should be limited to no more than 30 people and should be subject to the COVID-19 Secure guidelines.

People living outside the restricted areas can travel to the areas to attend a funeral.

Can I go on vacation in the restricted area or visit shops, leisure facilities or cafes?

Yes. However, you need to avoid getting in touch with people indoors if you do.

Can I drive in a car with someone I don't live with?

You should try not to share a vehicle with anyone outside of your household or social bubble. If you have to, try:

  • Share the shipment with the same people each time
  • Stick to small groups of people at all times
  • Open window for ventilation
  • Travel side by side or behind other people instead of facing them where the seating arrangement allows you to move away from each other
  • Consider seating arrangements to maximize the distance between people in the vehicle
  • Clean your car between journeys with standard cleaning agents. Clean the door handles and other areas that can be touched by people
  • Ask the driver and passengers to wear facewear

When is the blocking checked?

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the measures would be reviewed weekly.

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