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The rising trend for boomeranged young adults to return to live with their parents is here to stay, the study says


According to a study, an increasing trend of young adults moving back in with their parents will continue.

The researchers found that nearly two-thirds of childless single adults aged 20-34 in the UK either never left home or had to move back in due to a precarious job market, sky-high rents, low wages and life shocks.

The number is an estimated 3.5 million single young adults.

Given the growing economic and social impact of the coronavirus pandemic, this trend is likely to accelerate, the researchers said.

The study's author, Katherine Hill of Loughborough University's Center for Social Policy Research, said the trend was "here to stay".

According to a study, an increasing trend of young adults moving back in with their parents will continue

She said, "Children who live at home until their 20s are not a passing phenomenon, they are here to stay."

"Many young people will spend most of their lives living this way."

Their study found that staying in a family home after the age of 18 is now common for people of all ethnicities and most income groups.

The Loughborough Research was the first large-scale study of the boomerang phenomenon.

It found that between 2008 and 2018, the proportion of single 20- to 34-year-olds without children who lived with their parents rose from 55 percent to 63 percent.

Around 71 percent of people in their early 20s live with their parents, compared to 54 percent in their late 20s.

Around a third of people in their early 30s still live at home, according to the researchers.

Overall, 27 percent of 20 to 34-year-olds – including those who are not single – lived at home in 2019, an increase of five percent since 2008.

In 1999 it was 20 percent.

The researchers found that nearly two-thirds of childless single adults aged 20 to 34 in the UK either never left home or moved back in due to a precarious job market, sky-high rents, low wages and life shocks

The researchers found that nearly two-thirds of childless single adults aged 20-34 in the UK either never left home or had to move back in due to a precarious job market, sky-high rents, low wages and life shocks

Overall, 27 percent of 20- to 34-year-olds - including those who are not single - lived at home in 2019, an increase of five percent since 2008

Overall, 27 percent of 20 to 34-year-olds – including those who are not single – lived at home in 2019, an increase of five percent since 2008

The researchers said the prospect of sharing a home with adult children for up to 10 years would require a reassessment of expectations for both parents and their offspring.

Negotiating factors such as adult children paying rent, contributing to bills and helping with housework can cause "some agony".

Privacy and independence issues also arise, especially when the house is crowded.

Senaka Rupasinha, 26, of Maidstone, Kent, is a chemistry teacher who moved home to London in February after teaching six months.

"It didn't feel good," says the 26-year-old chemistry teacher, who had to move home

Chemistry teacher Senaka Rupasinha, 26, from Maidstone, Kent, had to move back in with his parents in February.

He told MailOnline that having to return home was "not good" and initially wanted to "be out there as soon as possible".

He said, “It took me some time to adjust and I kept wanting to move out as soon as I could because I wanted independence back.

Chemistry teacher Senaka Rupasinha, 26, from Maidstone, Kent, had to move back in with his parents in February

Chemistry teacher Senaka Rupasinha, 26, from Maidstone, Kent, had to move back in with his parents in February

“The main thing is that you are back in the parent-child dynamic.

“You are no longer your own boss.

"You have to do what your mom or dad says because they're there."

Mr. Rupasinha, who had to move home for health reasons and now teaches online, said living with his parents felt like a "step backwards".

“You definitely feel like it's a step back.

“But I think it feels that way, but it's not necessarily the case.

“In reality it can sometimes be useful to do this, but it is exactly what you need to do under the circumstances.

“I think it all depends on your relationship with your family.

"If it's not a good relationship, it becomes really difficult."

However, Mr. Rupasinha said the move had some "good effects".

He was able to save a lot of money and now has a good relationship with his parents.

"It has had some good effects that I have become much closer to my parents," he said.

"My parents don't charge me rent so I can save most of the money I got."

“I'm saving as much money now as in London.

"It's crazy to think that I'm making a lot less but still saving the same amount," he added.

He told MailOnline that having to return home was "not good" and initially wanted to "be out there as soon as possible".

He said, “The main thing is that you are back in the parent-child dynamic. You are no longer your own boss. You have to do what your mom or dad says because they're there. & # 39;

However, Mr Rupasinha, who had to move home for health reasons and now teaches online, said he could save a lot of money by no longer having to pay rent in London.

"That was one of the advantages," he said.

"My parents don't charge me rent so I can save most of the money I got."

The Loughborough study also claimed that low-income families are most affected by the tendency for children to move home, as it may mean they are less entitled to benefits than if they were supporting a child under 18.

In some cases, this can be offset by the young adult's income, although parents can still lose depending on how much their adult children contribute to the family costs.

The total combined income for a couple with a child aged 24 living with them is £ 25 per week less than that for a youth aged 14.

This is because the working-age benefits for a 24-year-old are less than the tax credits and child benefit for a 14-year-old.

Overall, a family using benefits with a 24 year old at home is up to £ 90 per week worse off than having a child aged 14 if the cost of living is included.

The investigation came after figures showed that 538,000 under 25s claimed a record of universal loan freezes.

And on Monday the government was urged to hold an employment summit warning that up to a million young people could be unemployed within weeks.

The Alliance for Full Employment (AFFE), launched by former Labor Prime Minister Gordon Brown, said ministers would need to come up with a joint plan agreed with the decentralized governments of the tube mayors of Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England fight youth unemployment.

Research for the alliance suggests 1.5 million young people will need help in the coming year to cope with rising unemployment.

Professor Paul Gregg, who wrote a report for AFFE, said the government's Kickstart youth unemployment program will not offer nearly enough places for those in need.

Around 60 percent of the layoffs since March have struck those under the age of 25, and the unemployment rate for young men is already more than three times that for adults, the report said.

Mr Brown said: “This report describes the arithmetic of hardship and desolation when youth unemployment gets out of hand, and that will alarm every parent in every region and nation in the UK.

“We are facing a far greater challenge today than we were in the 1980s, and what is needed is a UK Employment Summit to bring regions and nations together with the Prime Minister.

& # 39; Some will say this is too difficult to organize given the current breakdown in relations between Number 10 and the Regions and Nations, but unless we listen to what is happening on the ground and mobilize all the resources of the whole of the UK and Britain If we work together to coordinate our response, we will fail a generation of young people as surely as we did for too long in the 1980s.

"The prime minister should recognize that all of his initiatives – Kickstart and the other related training and employment initiatives – when brought together, simply fail to deliver on his promise of 'helping all' create opportunities."

"The current plans do not yet cover a large number of the young people in need of support, and they do not yet provide all of the quality work experience and training that young people need."

On Monday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown called on the government to hold an employment summit, warning that up to a million young people could be unemployed within weeks

On Monday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown called on the government to hold an employment summit, warning that up to a million young people could be unemployed within weeks

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