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The rise of "poor funerals": The agony of mourning as the cost of cremations increases despite the corona virus


The rise of "poor burials": The agony of the bereaved is increasing, although the cost of cremations increases despite the Covid crisis after two-thirds of the councils have raised prices by up to 16%, bringing the average ceremony to GBP 775

The cost of rest for your loved ones increased during the coronavirus pandemic – despite the providers who offer "poor funerals" in closures.

Although only a limited number of family members and friends can attend the ceremonies, two thirds of the councilors have raised their prices to 16%.

The rise of Covid-19 has meant that fewer mourners can attend funerals in order to maintain social distance.

However, the average cost of cremation by a local authority in the UK is £ 775, compared to £ 752 in the past financial year. Ten years ago the average funeral was £ 470.

The rules for burials during the state pandemic must be followed

Some councils have responded by cutting costs while a quarter of them have simply frozen their prices.

A widower told the BBC that barring his wife was like "poor funeral."

Neville Wilson said only five mourners could send Ms. Doreen after she died of lung cancer in March.

He said the funeral procession was just a hearse, with no family attending the ceremony with their own cars.

The Coventry city council, which headed the service, reduced it from 45 minutes to 15 minutes, but still charged the same price.

Mechanical engineer Wilson, 66, said: “It felt incredibly bad.

Crematoria have increased from £ 752 last year to £ 775, although services are limited

Crematoria have increased from £ 752 last year to £ 775, although services are limited

Churches do not reopen for funerals, but leadership means that a large number cannot attend to show respect to the deceased

Churches do not reopen for funerals, but leadership means that a large number cannot attend to show respect to the deceased

& # 39; It felt like a poor man's funeral. It couldn't get any worse if we tried.

"Then I did my own research to see which councils and which councils freeze costs, and I thought if some councils did, why didn't the Coventry councils do it?"

Local authorities have defended price increases, pointing out that they were agreed before the pandemic, which also made it more expensive.

Andrew Walster of the Coventry City Council said service times need to be shortened to introduce thorough cleaning between service jobs.

He said: "Unfortunately, this did not reduce our cost of providing this service to the public, but actually increased it by providing those additional facilities for survivors," he said.

"We did not pass on these additional costs."

Down to Earth, an organization created to end "burial poverty", hit the price hikes.

Managing Director Lindesay Mace said: “What we see here are increases in cremation fees up to six, seven and even 10% in some places over the past year.

"These types of price increases are clearly beyond the possibilities of the average person, especially considering that incomes have not increased nearly as much."

Julie Dunk, managing director of the Institute for Cemetery and Crematorium Management, said the councils should invest in environmentally friendly equipment.

But widower Wilson said prices are increasing fear of struggling families,

He added: “My two sons are still very angry. My wife's family is also very annoyed that they were unable to attend. I really wouldn't wish my worst enemy, ”he said.

"The word is terrible."

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