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The retired doctor criticizes the bureaucratic chaos clogging the introduction of mass vaccination in the UK


A retired doctor has beaten the NHS for bureaucratic controls like anti-radicalization training that delayed them in delivering the Covid vaccine.

Former occupational doctor Celia Palmer from London blew up the health service because of its “bureaucratic” volunteer admission system.

It comes when doctors say they will defy government orders to give a second thrust to elderly patients who were promised on their first shot.

Officials said patients who received one dose should postpone their second – which they were told would receive three weeks later – for up to 12 weeks.

But doctors have been outraged, saying they will not deny vulnerable patients the vaccines they promised them because just one push won't work as well.

Former occupational doctor Celia Palmer from London blew up the health service because of its “bureaucratic” volunteer admission system

It comes when doctors say they will defy government orders to give a second thrust to elderly patients who were promised on their first shot. Pictured: NHS England boss Sir Simon Stevens

It comes when doctors say they will defy government orders to give a second thrust to elderly patients who were promised on their first shot. Pictured: NHS England boss Sir Simon Stevens

Officials (pictured, Chris Whitty) said patients who received one dose should have their second dose - which was to be given to them three weeks later - postponed for up to 12 weeks

Officials (pictured, Chris Whitty) said patients who received one dose should have their second dose – which was to be given to them three weeks later – postponed for up to 12 weeks

Dr. Palmer said she was contacted about returning to the front lines in April, but it took 21 emails to be accepted and she still needs additional training.

It pushed through the controls that required medical professionals to demonstrate they were trained in issues such as counterterrorism and racial equality.

She told the Today program: "I was first contacted by the GMC in early April saying that my registration had been temporarily restored and invited me to respond to the Covid crisis, which of course I did.

Twenty-one emails later, I was accepted as a vaccine, but I was invited to take a survey as I have not yet been contacted with a start date or place of work.

"I still have to train a little and I don't know what this training involves."

When asked if she was asked to fill out certain forms about her background, she said, “Nobody asked me to do it, I didn't, I can't see how relevant it is to a mass vaccination program.

"We'll probably be working in groups, and I don't see doctors who are vaccinated – like most of us, I believe – need anti-radicalization programs."

She said, “I think you have to work the first principle to say that you are looking at the job you have to do. If it is fairly easy, you can identify the risks and for such a mass task there has to be a special way that allows us to do it safely, but does not delay the process of introducing the vaccination program. & # 39;

She added, "If, as I mentioned earlier, they vaccinate two million people a week, I can't see exactly how you can expect busy GPs looking after patients … how are they going to possibly do that?" without additional help. & # 39;

Meanwhile, general practitioners have classified the one-dose policy as "grossly unfair," and frustrated scientists warned that clinical trials only tested how well they worked with a three-week gap.

Chris Whitty, chief medical officer, said in a letter with his colleagues in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that a single dose could provide 70 percent protection.

He said having this on a larger number of people would be more effective than 95 percent protection on half as many.

Margaret Keenan, the first person in the world to receive a Covid-19 vaccine, received her second bump earlier this week.

But thousands of others across the UK will postpone their second appointments so the NHS can focus on providing more people with bumps.

According to the Department of Health, a total of 944,539 people across the UK had received the first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine by December 27.

The Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association (HCSA) warned that the "ill-conceived" plan to postpone the second dose would keep many vulnerable workers in suspense while a doctor said they would be elderly patients who had been promised continue to give the second dose.

However, those in support of the new plan say that every second dose administered is one less first hit for someone at high risk of dying from Covid-19.

Margaret Keenan returned to the hospital this week to get her second round of the Covid-19 vaccine, but thousands of other patients are expected to reschedule their appointments as part of a new program to get more people to get their first dose

Margaret Keenan returned to the hospital this week to get her second round of the Covid-19 vaccine, but thousands of other patients are expected to reschedule their appointments as part of a new program to get more people to get their first dose

Doctors across the country say they will continue the original three-week vaccination schedule for patients who were promised this when they received their first sting.

General practitioners working for NHS bodies in Black Country and West Birmingham, as well as a doctor in Oxford, said they would keep the commitments they made to patients.

A medic in Walsall told the Telegraph, "Our patients agreed to a two-dose vaccination schedule and anything else would do them a disservice."

And Dr. Helen Salisbury, from an operation in Oxford, told BBC Radio 4's Today program that it was a matter of not breaking our promise.

She said, “We have been told we can use our clinical discretion, and that is exactly what we are doing.

PFIZER strikes back in the UK plan to give people one dose, not two

Pfizer warned yesterday that there is "no data" to show that a single dose of its coronavirus vaccine offers long-term protection after the UK abandoned its original jab rollout plan.

The UK medical regulator is now recommending that two doses of Covid should be given three months apart instead of four weeks so that millions of people can be immunized in less time.

The strategy applies to both Pfizer / BioNTech's vaccine and the newly approved Oxford / AstraZeneca sting, although there is limited data on the effectiveness of the starting doses.

It is a direct response to the emergence of Covid cases and hospitalizations across the UK caused by a new, highly infectious strain that emerged in the south east of England in September.

Virtually all of England faces a brutal lockdown by the spring, with Covid vaccines the only hope to end the devastation.

Health bosses now want to give as many people as possible an initial dose rather than withhold the second dose so more people can enjoy at least some protection.

AstraZeneca praised the move and announced that it had tested the three-month strategy in its studies on a small subset of test subjects.

However, Pfizer said there was no data in its studies to show that its vaccine protects against Covid every 12 weeks.

In a thinly veiled slap in the UK, the US company warned that all "alternative" dosing regimes should be closely monitored by health authorities.

Data from the Phase 3 study showed that although partial protection from the vaccine appears to begin as early as 12 days after the first dose, two doses of the vaccine are required to provide maximum protection against the disease, a vaccine effectiveness of 95 percent, ”Pfizer said in a statement.

"There is no data to show that protection is maintained after the first dose after 21 days."

& # 39; There are several reasons. One of them is science – we really don't have any data as far as I could tell, maybe there is data that they haven't published – but we don't have any data on immunity after the first dose after 21 days when people put their booster in their trial, we don't know what is happening.

“But the second, and in my opinion more important, concerns our patients and our very vulnerable patients, the elderly, whom we want to protect the most, and the relationship we have with them. Your trust in us, your trust in science and the vaccine.

"When you started treatment with a patient and said," This is the plan. Here is a push. Please come back in three weeks. It's really important that you have the second bump that is fully protected. "and then to turn around five minutes later and say," Don't worry about that, it's okay, you can have it in 12 weeks, not three weeks. "- I think that's actually not good enough.

A statement released yesterday evening by the UK chief medical officer said the decision had been made on a “balance between risks and benefits”.

The medical officers are Professor Whitty (England), Dr. Frank Atherton (Wales), Dr. Gregor Smith (Scotland) and Dr. Michael McBride (Northern Ireland).

They said, “We need to make sure we maximize the number of people eligible to receive the vaccine.

& # 39; Currently the main obstacle to this is the availability of vaccines, a global problem and it will remain so for several months and especially during the critical winter period.

& # 39; The availability of the AZ vaccine (Oxford / AstraZeneca) reduces but does not eliminate this main problem. Vaccine shortages are a reality that one cannot wish for. & # 39;

Doctors explained the rationale behind the dosage change, saying they were "confident" that a dose of the vaccine from Pfizer or Oxford and AstraZeneca would provide "significant protection" against Covid-19 for most people.

They added: “In terms of priority group protection, a model where we can vaccinate twice as many people in the next two to three months is obviously much preferable in terms of public health than one where we can vaccinate half vaccinate the number, but only slightly greater protection. & # 39;

The letter was released yesterday after a violent backlash against government plans to postpone the second dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

This prick, which was first approved by the UK and put into service from December 8th, has been tested as a two-dose vaccine and has been shown to be 95 percent effective at preventing it in clinical trials where the three doses were given of Covid-19 weeks apart.

Scientists have yet to publish data on how well the vaccine would work if the doses were more widely distributed, with a longer period between puffs.

Pfizer itself hit back on the UK government's plan to change the way the vaccine is used, saying this week: "Although partial protection from the vaccine appears to begin as early as 12 days after the first dose, two doses of the Any vaccine required will provide the maximum protection against the disease, a vaccine effectiveness of 95 percent.

"There is no data to show that protection is maintained after the first dose after 21 days."

Doctors are furious with the decision, which means they'll have to cancel appointments that have already been made for hundreds of thousands of patients who have already received a first dose.

Paul Donaldson, general secretary of the Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association (HCSA), said the decision was "bizarre" and "poorly thought out".

He said: “While a planned and orderly use of Oxford vaccination including longer deadlines makes epidemiological sense, the decision to throw a wrench into the work of the existing Pfizer rollout seems simply bizarre unless there is an unknown problem in the supply.

& # 39; We hear that vulnerable hospital doctors at high risk of Covid have been instructed not to show up for the second dose and are therefore not receiving full protection.

& # 39; You are now being left in the balance by hastily phrased policy that seems extremely ill-conceived.

"For example, to get in touch with only 2,000 elderly or vulnerable patients, a team of five has to work in a practice for about a week, and that is simply untenable."

Other health experts have stated that delaying the second dose will cause major problems for thousands of partially vaccinated elderly and vulnerable people.

Richard Vautrey, Chairman of the British Medical Association's GP Committee, said, “It is gross and obviously unfair to tens of thousands of our most vulnerable patients to try to reschedule their appointments now.

"The decision to ask general practitioners to rebook the patients for three months at such short notice will also cause enormous logistical problems for almost all vaccination centers and practices."

Is Britain's Great Vaccination Drive Ready?

Retired doctors desperate to roll up their sleeves and help the UK give 2 million Covid vaccines every week to end the continuous cycle of lockdowns through spring have today overcome the NHS bureaucracy after which they Have to prove they are not terrorists before they are allowed to participate.

Ex-meds wanting to go straight to the front line to deliver the thrusts have complained about the bizarre requirement to include up to 21 documents in their application, including proof that they have completed radicalization prevention training.

Dr. Melanie Jones, a former anesthetist in South Wales, urged the NHS to "bend some rules" so they could use the "Dad's Army" of up to 40,000 retired doctors and nurses who volunteer in the spring have reported. Another retired medical professional claimed he would not bother to apply after being told by Dr. Jones & # 39; had heard of the ordeal on social media.

Despite their appeals, the general practitioners in charge of the vaccine supply say they urgently need more manpower to help Britain drastically speed up the mammoth surgery. This is believed to be the only hope Britain ever has of getting back to normal life before spring.

However, the NHS has not yet asked the army to support the introduction of the turbocharger. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace today insists that the military stands ready to dispense up to 100,000 doses a day should health care ever need to. Even Tesco has offered to hand over its network of refrigerated trucks and warehouses to charge the roll-out.

Matt Hancock has repeatedly promised that the draconian restrictions, which have been continuously enforced since March, can be lifted once millions of the most vulnerable members of society have been given the sting – but No10 has never committed to an actual number and the nation completely leave unsuspecting when they will be able to live normal lives again.

And Downing Street's plan to vaccinate 2 million people against Covid every week could be doomed before the biggest vaccination campaign in British history even started, despite Labor urging ministers to “move heaven and earth “And accelerate the introduction quickly.

In yet another blow to plans to drastically speed up vaccination campaigns, NHS England numbers showed today that the rate at which puffs were delivered slowed during the Christmas break – from around 292,000 puffs a week to 243,000 within seven Days end December 27th.

And a MailOnline analysis found that the UK may not be able to vaccinate all 30 million Britons on the priority list by December 2022 if the NHS can only keep going at the current pace. And it would take twice as long to make sure they got the second dose they needed.

Even if health chiefs manage to increase injections to a million a week, it could be until August next year for # 10 to complete phase one by giving a dose of the push to the most vulnerable members of society.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock promised yesterday that the UK would deliver the bumps as soon as it receives them. The head of AstraZeneca – whose coronavirus vaccine got the green light yesterday – insisted they could dispense 2 million doses a week by mid-January.

But supply problems could ruin the grand plans. No10's Vaccine Task Force originally promised 30 million doses of the Oxford / AstraZeneca push by the end of the year before reducing its claim to 4 million – but has since warned of "manufacturing challenges". Mr Hancock announced yesterday that the UK will only have 500,000 cans ready as of Monday.

Professor David Salisbury, a former vaccination director at the Department of Health and now an expert in the Chatham House think tank, spoke out on behalf of the government, saying it was all about saving lives.

He said vaccinating as many people as possible is a top priority now, even if that means the vaccines are a little less effective than what would be an ideal scenario.

He told Radio 4: 'The reason is to save lives …

“In a perfect world there would have been huge supplies of vaccines, getting the vaccines in as soon as needed wouldn't be a problem, but we're facing increasing cases, increasing hospital admissions and increasing deaths.

"We have to do something, and administrative inconvenience really isn't a good reason not to save lives."

He added, "Every time we give a second dose now, we are holding it back from someone who is likely to die from developing coronavirus. And much more likely to die than someone who has already received a single dose.

"I just think it's so clear that we should do that."

The approval of the vaccine by Oxford University and AstraZeneca should expedite roll-out once administration begins on Monday 4th January.

Unlike Pfizer, this bump can be kept in a regular refrigerator instead of a dedicated freezer and is much easier to transport and store. This means that it can be distributed in larger quantities at vaccination centers and used for a longer period between deliveries.

The number of vaccines the UK will issue before lockdown rules can be relaxed depends on the government's “risk appetite” and how well they work in real life, scientists say.

There are around 31.7 million people on the official waiting list for a sting, including everyone over 50, younger but critically ill people, and millions of NHS and social workers.

The UK is currently dispensing 300,000 doses a week, a number that is expected to accelerate as clinics use the pioneering Oxford University and AstraZeneca Jab, which were approved yesterday.

MPs and experts are calling for the vaccines to be delivered at lightning speed in order to stop the spread of the new coronavirus variant. New evidence suggests that they may be so contagious that lockdowns can barely contain them.

Labor shadow health minister Jonathan Ashworth yesterday urged ministers to "move heaven and earth to introduce vaccination at 2 million hits per week".

Even at this ambitious pace – almost six times as many vaccinations are currently in progress – it would be until April for everyone on the priority list to get a dose.

However, there is hope that some restrictions could be lifted before the list is finalized. Matt Hancock said No. 10 can lift restrictions "if enough people susceptible to Covid-19 have been vaccinated". However, he never committed to an actual number.

However, one scientist told MailOnline that it was impossible to give a logical number when this would happen and it would depend on how much risk the government wants to take. If the locks are lifted too early, there may be spikes in severe cases, hospital admissions, and deaths in groups with medium risk but no priority for a vaccine like middle age.

According to the NHS, people over 70 and people with the most serious long-term health conditions are at "high risk" from Covid-19. Together with health and nursing staff, they form a group of 14.3 million people who could each be given a single dose within seven weeks at an ambitious rate of 2 million per week by mid-February.

However, lifting the lockdown rules would mean that younger groups, for example in their 60s, 50s and 40s, would be at risk from a virus that was then uncontrollable, and that would mean that those already vaccinated would not have the full protection of two doses that both need vaccines.

Herd immunity, where so many people are vaccinated that the virus can no longer spread, will be impossible with the current strategy, scientists warned. U.S. director of infectious diseases Anthony Fauci said he doesn't expect the country to get anywhere near 'normal' by the end of 2021, even if 80 percent of the population is vaccinated.

UK restrictions are more likely to be lifted for an extended period of time to halt the virus spiral in younger people who are still at low risk of hospitalization, death or long-term complications.

Scientists believe that the current lockdown cycles will last into late spring or even summer, even if the vaccination program goes according to plan, meaning England will face many months of misery.

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