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The RAF reservist killed herself after severe insomnia and called her wedding day free


A former army reservist took her own life after suffering severe insomnia when she canceled her wedding.

Leanne Carroll, 37, was due to get married, but she ended her engagement to her fiancé six months before the ceremony for reasons unknown.

The PE teacher later started seeing a new friend, but was so overwhelmed by the anxiety and depression associated with sleep loss that she sent her father a text saying, "Dad, I'm not feeling well please. I do not know what to do. I feel like I'm going crazy & # 39;

The tragic Leanne Carroll (pictured) was supposed to get married, but ended her engagement to her fiancé six months before the ceremony

Despite the help of her family and health professionals, Miss Carroll was found dead by her family at her home in Middleton, Greater Manchester.

An investigation found that police investigating the tragedy on December 20, 2018 found sticky notes in the apartment expressing concerns, including "letting people down" and "being alone". Her new boyfriend should visit her this weekend.

The Rochdale hearing had previously learned that Miss Carroll was also a police officer on the RAF reservations. Her family described her as "a loving and kind soul who brought love and light to the people she touched".

Her father, Bernard Carroll, said in a statement: “She joined the Army Reserves at the age of 33 and there met her longtime partner Jay. She then joined the RAF reserves as a police officer and was still a duty officer at the time of her death.

She was supposed to get married in October 2018, but canceled the wedding last April. The family was worried at first, but Leanne seemed to be fine.

In September she threw herself into work for the RAF and spent weeks away from home. The family believes there may have been too many night shifts.

She worked three weeks with only one night off, and we didn't see much of her at the time, and when we did she looked shaken.

Police investigating the December 2018 tragedy found sticky notes in Leanne's apartment (pictured) expressing concerns, including "letting people down" and "being alone".

Leanne (pictured) had texted her father Bernard Carroll saying she had to go to the hospital, felt suicidal for weeks, and feared she might harm herself

Leanne had started suffering from sleep, loss of function, and worries about unemployment after breaking off her engagement

Her sister Gemma received a message from Leanne that she was not feeling right. She said she hadn't been to work in a week and hadn't slept properly in weeks.

She was feeling really, really scared and not sleeping and had eczema in her eyes.

Leanne had asked for advice, but each time she visited her GP, she was prescribed a different medication.

"I had received a text message that said," Dad, I am not feeling well, please, I think I have to go to the hospital, felt suicidal for weeks and feared I would harm myself.

Father Bernard Carroll (pictured with his daughter Leanne) had received a text message from his daughter saying she had been feeling suicidal for weeks and was afraid I would harm myself.

Father Bernard Carroll (pictured with his daughter Leanne) had received a text message from his daughter saying she had been feeling suicidal for weeks and was afraid I would harm myself.

"I don't know what to do. I feel like I'm going crazy." It's the first time she mentions harming herself.

She had a flashback of feeling like she didn't want to be here. I tried to contact Leanne when I received the text but she didn't respond. She answered Gemma and cried hysterically.

She said she drove her car on the M66 that afternoon to cause an accident but couldn't get through it and came home. She told me that she hadn't slept in a while and that everything was coming her way.

She said she had to go to North Manchester General Hospital and she seemed relieved that everything would be sorted out.

"She was told she qualified for a voluntary infirmary, but it was full of drunkards and drug addicts and it wasn't the best place for them."

Leanne seemed to accept that, but admitted that she was afraid of being alone. The crisis team visited her and was told that someone would be in contact about medication – but no one rang the bell.

"Leanne went to her apartment before the weekend of December 20th to sort things out. That day Gemma tried to contact her from 2pm and when she got no response we walked around."

Commenting on the exam, Gemma Carroll said, “Leanne was just incredibly low and going through the motions. I know what it feels like to be scared and she just didn't have a lot of energy and was very low.

Leanne (pictured) threw herself into work at the RAF and spent weeks away from home. The family believes there may have been too many night shifts

Leanne (pictured) threw herself into work at the RAF and spent weeks away from home. The family believes there may have been too many night shifts

“She went running and she could do that because she was in control and had hit the gym a few times during that time.

"She said her boyfriend Bill was coming to stay, but I raised concerns that she needs to focus on getting better."

Mental health nurse Gillian Fletcher, who treated Miss Carroll, told the hearing: "In April 2018, Leanne and her partner had split up and since then she had suffered from sleep, loss of function and worry, and had been to work for the past three weeks .

She was concerned about not sleeping, which caused her more anxiety and distress.

“She didn't want to end her life – she wanted to work toward recovery and formulated a safe plan with self-help techniques, had family support for her and she would use it.

“She could see signs of relapse and when she got worse she knew how to get professional help and support. She felt able to do so while her father and sister understood her condition.

Leanne was a very pleasant woman and believed that she would recover from her current phase of bad mood and anxiety. She wasn't suicidal and gave a reason to be like her family.

The investigation found that Leanne (pictured) did not want to end her life and she wanted to work towards a recovery and formulated a safe plan using self-help techniques

The investigation found that Leanne (pictured) did not want to end her life and she wanted to work towards a recovery and formulated a safe plan using self-help techniques

"She was not seen as a risk to herself at this point and denied that she was at such risk and was positive about working toward recovery."

A report examining how Miss Carroll's case was treated in the hospital found that she had been referred to the home treatment team but there was no communication with family members and confidence in Greater Manchester's mental health about the results was informed.

Coroner Michael Salt, who recorded a suicide conclusion from carbon monoxide poisoning, said, "Leanne may not have shared her circumstances with those who tried to help her.

“The family could have had more information about what Leanne was thinking and actually doing.

“It may not have changed the course of treatment, but I'm taking the family point on board in relation to that.

“However, I don't think I can expand that to say it contributed to her death. My condolences to the family and no doubt friends for their sad loss. & # 39;

A Just Giving page set up by her sister Gemma raised £ 915 for the Mind charity and the RAF Benevolent Fund.

If you are affected by any of the issues raised in this article, you can call the Samaritans on 116 123. Alternatively, you can visit the website by clicking Here.

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