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The pubs are preparing for the last evening before 10pm. The curfew on Covid starts tomorrow


Restaurant owners are seeing a wave of rejections ahead of Boris Johnson's new curfew on Covid tomorrow – as drinkers prepare to visit the city and downtown for one final evening of late drinking.

A restaurant chef says he could lose up to 20 percent of his evening business following the new measures announced by the prime minister yesterday.

The new rules come as the government wants to avoid a second national lockdown amid rising numbers of coronavirus infections.

However, just hours after Mr Johnson's announcement in a televised address to the nation, restaurants that had only just recovered from months of total Covid lockdown were faced with a wave of cancellations from affected customers.

George Madgwick, who runs The Wicks Bistro in Cosham, Portsmouth, said he has already received eight cancellations from worried guests who booked tables late at night.

Madgwick, 30, who went into business in February, a month before the lockdown began, said: “People are in no hurry and are concerned that it's not the last 10pm orders, but all at 10pm .

“It took away our ability to do three sessions in one night. Around 50 percent of our business is done at 7:30 p.m., and we get around 20 to 25 percent for tables at 5:00 p.m. So the tables at 8.45pm make up about 20 to 25 percent of our nightly business.

& # 39; We have already had eight cancellations since the announcement and in the past 24 hours we have had no bookings after 8:30 p.m. when we would normally have three or four.

Mr Madgwick says the cost of the business could be around £ 300 a night. But he says the biggest impact the curfew will have on his employees.

He said, “Instead of working until 11.30pm, everything has to close at 10pm so it's closer to 10:15 pm, which is an hour and a quarter fewer hours a day.

& # 39; It also has an impact on our deliveries because we will use less. We use local suppliers so that this also affects the entire chain. & # 39;

Party-goers are expected to hit the city across the country tonight before the rule changes, with pubs, bars and restaurants closing at 10 p.m.

The rule is part of a series of new measures announced by the Prime Minister yesterday as the government wants to avoid a second national lockdown amid rising numbers of coronavirus infections.

The night owls will be staying in pubs and bars for one final evening with nightly drinks before Boris Johnson's new curfew on Covid starts tomorrow. Pictured: revelers leave a student bar in Birmingham last night

During the academic year, students partied in Birmingham yesterday, but the nights could change dramatically from Thursday onwards

Party-goers are expected to hit the city across the country tonight before the rule changes, with pubs, bars and restaurants closing at 10 p.m. Pictured: Revelers are pictured outside in Birmingham last night

The rule is part of a series of new measures announced by the Prime Minister yesterday as the government wants to avoid a second national lockdown amid rising numbers of coronavirus infections. Pictured: Students enjoying an evening in Leeds last night

The rule is part of a series of new measures announced by the Prime Minister yesterday as the government seeks to avoid a second national lockdown amid rising numbers of coronavirus infections. Pictured: Students enjoying an evening in Leeds last night

But hours after the announcement was made on a television broadcast to the nation last night, dozens of revelers took to the streets of London (Image: people drinking socially distant in a bar in London), Leeds and Birmingham to enjoy their drinking maximize time before curfew from Thursday

But hours after the announcement was made on a television broadcast to the nation last night, dozens of revelers took to the streets of London (Image: people drinking socially distant in a bar in London), Leeds and Birmingham to enjoy their drinking maximize time before curfew from Thursday

But hours after the announcement, revelers hit the streets of London, Leeds and Birmingham to maximize their drinking time before the Thursday curfew.

Party-goers, including those who had recently arrived in Leeds and Birmingham to begin their academic year at university, swapped a night at home to visit the numerous pubs and bars in the area and party with friends.

Crowds of alcoholic night owls were in high spirits as they huddled in large groups without face masks and took to the streets of Leeds city center until the wee hours amid the coronavirus pandemic.

"Six months" restrictions at a glance

  • All pubs, bars and restaurants in England must be closed from Thursday at 10:00 p.m., while the premises must kick all customers out by the closing date.
  • The hospitality sector will also be limited to table service only, as the government has banned drinkers taking a trip to the bar.
  • All indoor employees and customers must wear masks unless they are seated to eat or drink.
  • All employees who can work from home will be asked to do so from tomorrow.
  • The fines for disregarding the rule of six and missing a mask increase to £ 200 for first offenses.
  • Police will now have the option to call on the military for assistance, with soldiers possibly being called in to guard protected areas so that officers have more time to take action against violations.
  • The number of people allowed to attend weddings in England will be reduced to 15 from Monday, but the number of people allowed to attend a funeral will remain at 30;
  • Plans for partial return of sports fans to the stadiums have been halted;
  • The exception to the rule of six is ​​tightened to ban team sports such as five-on-five football games

Meanwhile, others were seen queuing outside the Bristol Pear Pub in Selly Oak, Birmingham to enjoy a drink and to mark the start of the academic year.

The scenes came just hours after the Prime Minister took a series of measures to combat the virus, which so far has killed more than 40,000 people and infected more than 400,000 people in the UK.

As well as the curfew that Mr Johnson is adamant that the premises all their customers up to the limit, the The hospitality sector will also be limited to table service only, as the government has banned drinkers taking a trip to the bar.

All indoor retail workers and indoor hospitality customers must wear masks – except when they are sitting to eat or drink – while all employees who can work from home will be encouraged to do so starting tomorrow.

The fines for breaking the Rule of Six and missing face covering increase to £ 200 for a first offense.

Police will now have the option to call on the military for assistance, with soldiers possibly being called in to guard protected areas so that officers have more time to take action against violations.

Members of the government's emergency scientific advisory group (Sage) said the curfew would not be enough to slow the rate of infection.

However, Mr. Johnson insisted that his approach was based on an attempt to "balance saving lives with protecting jobs and livelihoods".

However, he said he reserved the right to "use greater firepower" if necessary.

Mr Raab said today that a second national lockdown may be needed to control the spread of the coronavirus if the latest measures don't work.

He told Sky News: “We always said we have some sort of repository for actions in the arsenal.

“I don't think we'd speculate about what else could be done.

"But the reality is that they will be more intrusive or we could end up in a national lockdown." We want to avoid that. & # 39;

The foreign minister said if "everyone is playing by the rules" a national lockdown may not be required at Christmas.

He said, “Let's hope that if we take these measures and if we all stick to the rules and we go into the Christmas season we can get through the winter months without going into this national lockdown with all the implications for society and families but also the damage it would do to businesses. & # 39;

Mr Raab also defended the government's 10 p.m. curfew on hospitality, though figures say only five percent of coronavirus cases are related to pubs, bars and restaurants.

"We know that in bars and restaurants, especially after people have had a few drinks in the late evening hours, there is a risk that compliance may deteriorate a bit," he said.

"We are taking this action and are confident, based on the evidence we have at home and abroad, that it is an element of what we must do."

The scenes came just hours after the Prime Minister took a series of measures to combat the virus, which so far has killed more than 40,000 people and infected more than 400,000 people in the UK. Pictured: revelers outside a bar in Selly Oak, Birmingham, last night

The scenes came just hours after the Prime Minister took a series of measures to combat the virus, which so far has killed more than 40,000 people and infected more than 400,000 people in the UK. Pictured: revelers outside a bar in Selly Oak, Birmingham, last night

Students in Selly Oak, Birmingham, were seen walking past a bar with a box of Carling lager hours after the new restrictions were announced last night

Students in Selly Oak, Birmingham, were seen walking past a bar with a box of Carling lager hours after the new restrictions were announced last night

The students in Birmingham made their way to Broad Street on Tuesday evening before pubs and bars had to observe a 10 p.m. curfew from tomorrow

The students in Birmingham made their way to Broad Street on Tuesday evening before pubs and bars had to observe a 10 p.m. curfew from tomorrow

Punters did a little worse in Birmingham as they made the most of their local pubs just hours after Boris Johnson told the nation that Covid-19 restrictions would be tightened

Punters did a little worse in Birmingham as they made the most of their local pubs just hours after Boris Johnson told the nation that Covid-19 restrictions would be tightened

In Leeds, some students tried to wear masks as they walked through night owls on the street, but most were out to socialize

In Leeds, some students tried to wear masks as they walked through night owls on the street, but most were out to socialize

Groups of students gathered on the streets of Leeds last night to enjoy the start of the academic year before the 10pm curfew goes into effect

Groups of students gathered on the streets of Leeds last night to enjoy the start of the academic year before the 10pm curfew goes into effect

The new rules will be a special blow to students who have already faced a completely different "Freshers Week" due to the government's previous Covid restrictions.

In September, students coming to Birmingham were urged to adhere to social distancing rules and Covid's guidelines to help prevent outbreaks of the virus in the city's universities.

It came after the city, home to more than 1.5 million people, was hit by draconian lockdown rules after the number of coronavirus patients admitted to hospitals in the city rose sharply.

This month, people in Birmingham and the neighboring towns of Solihull and Sandwell have been prohibited from mingling with anyone outside their own household in a private home, pub, restaurant or garden.

The move came after two days of crunch talks between the government and local health officials after the 7-day infection rate in Birmingham rose to 78 cases per 100,000.

It was now Leeds It was on the verge of a local lockdown and was placed on Public Health England's list of problem areas after the infection rate rose to 32.4 new cases per 100,000 people in the city of Yorkshire, home to half a million people.

The students in Leeds decided to go to the city instead of staying and watching Boris Johnson speak before the nation about Covid restrictions

Leeds students decided to go to town rather than stay and watch Boris Johnson speak to the nation about Covid restrictions

Leeds is close to a local lockdown and has been placed on Public Health England's list of problem areas

Leeds is close to a local lockdown and has been placed on Public Health England's list of problem areas

Many people predict that the punters will simply get to the pubs earlier and drink faster before the 10pm curfew that starts later this week

Many people predict that the punters will simply get to the pubs earlier and drink faster before the 10pm curfew that starts later this week

Drinking at home could be an alternative when the pubs close at 10pm. Some opt for this option in Birmingham

Drinking at home could be an alternative when the pubs close at 10pm. Some opt for this option in Birmingham

A group of students took to the streets in Leeds just hours after the government announced tougher measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus

A group of students took to the streets in Leeds just hours after the government announced tougher measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus

Revelers took to the streets of Leeds partying until the wee hours of the morning, just hours after the Prime Minister took a series of measures to fight the coronavirus

Revelers took to the streets of Leeds partying until the wee hours of the morning, just hours after the Prime Minister took a series of measures to fight the coronavirus

Numerous revelers and college students break social distancing guidelines when they congregate in the city until the wee hours of the morning without face masks

Numerous revelers and college students break social distancing guidelines when they congregate in the city until the wee hours of the morning without face masks

Revelers and college students came to the Bristol Pear Pub in Selly Oak, Birmingham, to spend the evening before the new 10 p.m. curfew went into effect

Revelers and college students came to the Bristol Pear Pub in Selly Oak, Birmingham, to spend the evening before the new 10 p.m. curfew went into effect

Earlier this month, thousands of ministers blocked young people preparing for university from attending freshman events. Health Secretary Lord Bethell urged freshmen and returning college students not to go to mass gatherings “in pubs, clubs and bedrooms”.

Meanwhile, University Secretary Michelle Donelan angrily warned major organizers that police would take "serious action" against them after reports that some companies were promoting mass social freshers events.

And Health Secretary Matt Hancock asked students to follow the rules for the sake of their education and the health of their parents and grandparents.

Health Secretary Lord Bethell said: “We are deeply concerned about the spread among students. Some of this dissemination will take place in universities, and I appreciate the vice chancellors' efforts to establish social distancing agreements in universities. We hope it will have an impact.

“However, part of the impact lies in their social life – in pubs, clubs and bedrooms across the country.

"That is the responsibility of the students themselves, and we are examining measures to improve and enforce the social distancing measures that are stopping the spread of this disease."

Revelers enjoy an evening in Leeds city center

A group of revelers party in Leeds until the wee hours of the morning

Groups of night owls appeared in high spirits as they huddled in large groups without face masks and partied until the wee hours of the morning

Revelers are breaking social distancing guidelines when they take to the streets of Leeds and spend a night amid the coronavirus pandemic

Revelers are breaking social distancing guidelines when they take to the streets of Leeds and spend a night amid the coronavirus pandemic

A group of night owls take to the streets of Leeds without a mask, enjoying an evening just a few days before the pubs, bars and restaurants curfew at 10pm

A group of night owls take to the streets of Leeds without a mask, enjoying an evening just a few days before the pubs, bars and restaurants curfew at 10pm

Crowds stand in front of a pub in Leeds to spend an evening despite the current six rules measures

Crowds stand in front of a pub in Leeds to spend an evening despite the current six rules measures

In Leeds, people cross a street as dozens of revelers take to the city streets to spend a night amid the coronavirus pandemic

In Leeds, people cross a street as numerous revelers take to the city streets to spend a night amid the coronavirus pandemic

Party-goers gather in the streets of Leeds to spend an evening partying into the wee hours of the morning, just days before the new curfew goes into effect

Party-goers gather in the streets of Leeds to spend an evening partying into the wee hours of the morning, just days before the new curfew goes into effect

People are gathering on the streets of Leeds to spend a night just days before the new 10 p.m. curfew comes into effect

People are gathering on the streets of Leeds to spend a night just days before the new 10 p.m. curfew comes into effect

Just hours after the government tightened its coronavirus measures, people are lining up outside the Bristol Pear Pub

Just hours after the government tightened its coronavirus measures, people are lining up outside the Bristol Pear Pub

Crowds of students disobey the rule of six as they cluster in large groups without face masks in a nearby par

Crowds of students disobey the rule of six as they cluster in large groups without face masks in a nearby par

The scenes come as Boris Johnson today announced a new wave of Covid-19 restrictions that could last up to six months – including a 10 p.m. curfew on bars, pubs and restaurants in England.

The 10pm curfew in the hospitality industry sparked an immediate backlash in the industry when the UKHospitality group said it was "another major blow".

There are also fears that the move could have unintended consequences if warned of a possible “increase in unregulated events and house parties”.

Tory MPs also expressed concern about the curfew, calling it a "terrible blow" to the hotel industry and warning that there could be no further "major lockdown".

It was alleged overnight that Mr Johnson had initially advocated a full shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors before Chancellor Rishi Sunak persuaded him to adopt a less stringent course after warning of economic slaughter.

As part of the new measures, plans for a partial return of sports fans to the stadiums have been "suspended" from October 1st, while the number of people allowed to attend weddings will be reduced to 15.

Mr Johnson also announced the end of the government's return to work and urged the British to work from home when they can.

Bar-goers at the Westminster Arms pub in London watch the Prime Minister address the nation on new coronavirus restrictions

Bar-goers at the Westminster Arms pub in London watch the Prime Minister address the nation on new coronavirus restrictions

Customers at the Westminster Arms pub in London watch Boris Johnson make an emotional plea for the country

Customers at the Westminster Arms pub in London watch Boris Johnson make an emotional plea for the country

Face masks must also be worn in public transportation and in many indoor spaces, including shops, shopping malls, transportation hubs, museums, galleries, cinemas, and public libraries.

Those who don't wear face masks can expect a £ 200 fine.

Just hours after the new measures were in place, the Prime Minister made an emotional appeal to the nation, warning the British they are facing a long, harsh winter of police-enforced restrictions on their freedom to fight off the coronavirus.

He also hit on his critics – including Tory MPs and business leaders, who warned of the economic ramifications of the tough measures, adding, “For those who say we don't need this stuff and we should let people do their own Taking risks I say these risks are not our own.

“The tragic reality with Covid is that your mild cough can be someone else's death knell.

The prime minister said it was necessary to reintroduce measures to avoid a dramatic increase in deaths and a second, economically devastating total lockdown

The prime minister said it was necessary to reintroduce measures to avoid a dramatic increase in deaths and a second, economically devastating total lockdown

“And as for the suggestion that we should just imprison the elderly and vulnerable – with all the suffering that would entail – I have to tell you that this is just not realistic.

"Because if you let the virus get through the rest of the population, it would inevitably get to the elderly, and in much larger numbers."

Despite the Prime Minister's new move, some experts have already warned the measures will not be enough after Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance said yesterday that the UK could suffer 50,000 cases a day by mid-October and more than 200 deaths a day by November, unless Britain changes course.

ARE CURFEWS WORKING FOR THE SPREAD OF THE VIRUS?

From Thursday evenings, bars, pubs and restaurants across England will have to close at 10pm every night.

The step is an "intermediate step" in the fight against the virus and follows the steps of Thailand.

When Thailand imposed a curfew from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. on April 3, it counted just over 100 cases of coronavirus a day. By the time the curfew was lifted on June 15, that number had fallen to the low tens.

Although the country's success is due to the curfew, some scholars deny it, saying the lockdown and other social measures in place at the time had a greater impact.

Britain hopes its curfew can help reflect the success of the Southeast Asian nation.

Linda Bauld, Professorin für öffentliche Gesundheit an der Universität von Edinburgh, sagte, HuffPost-Ausgangssperren würden verwendet, weil "wir wissen, dass Nachtwirtschaft im Allgemeinen riskant ist".

"Es gab Ausbrüche in Verbindung mit Nachtclubs, Bars und Restaurants", sagte sie. "Wir wissen das seit Monaten."

"Je länger die Leute an diesen Orten sind, desto mehr lassen sie wahrscheinlich ihre Wachsamkeit hinter sich und die Mischung aus sozialer Distanzierung und Alkohol ist trotz der besten Bemühungen von Zöllnern und Veranstaltungsortbesitzern nicht gut."

Die Verhaltensexpertin Professor Susan Michie, Mitglied der Wissenschaftlichen Beratergruppe für Notfälle (SAGE), meinte, die Zeit um 22 Uhr sei gewählt worden, um die Bedürfnisse der Nachtwirtschaft mit der Notwendigkeit der Viruskontrolle in Einklang zu bringen.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Boris Johnson (t) Coronavirus