TOP TRENDING

The pub landlord claims that a competitive dining contest couldn't brave the lockdown


A pub landlord was beaten up for holding a competitive eating contest during the lockdown and claiming he was not breaking the rules because it was a "top sport".

Craig Harker, 33, received a call from the council after complaints about a dining contest were filed on Saturday at the George Pub & Grill in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham.

The event was held in conjunction with the British Eating League, but a complaint was filed after it was feared it would violate lockdown rules.

However, Mr Harker, who runs the pub, hit back on those who complained and insisted no rules were broken.

According to government policy, eateries such as restaurants and pubs must be closed except for the provision of take-away food and drink.

Craig Harker (pictured), 33, received a call from the council after complaints about a dining contest filed at the George Pub & Grill in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, on Saturday

However, the venues may be open for a small number of optional activities, including elite athletes who wish to train and participate in competitions.

Mr Harker says he followed the guidelines in classifying competitive food as a top sport.

He told Teesside Live, “On Saturday we held a British Eating League event in the pub during the national lockdown.

& # 39; The venue was closed to the public and only the TV production team and athletes were allowed to enter the grounds.

& # 39; Government guidelines state that elite sport can continue during the lockdown and there is no higher league for competitive eating than the British Eating League.

The event was held in conjunction with the British Eating League, but a complaint was filed after it was feared it would violate lockdown rules. Pictured: a competitor

Pictured: a competitor

The event was held in conjunction with the British Eating League, but a complaint was filed after it was feared it would violate the lockdown rules. Pictured: competitor

& # 39; Food Sports TV was also in charge of production, and government guidelines allow all TV production to continue.

"A covid risk assessment was carried out and advice was given by the UKCEO and CEGA, the UK governing body for competitive food."

In a video posted on his Facebook page shortly after receiving a call from the council on Monday, Mr Harker said he was not being "bullied" or "not holding events".

He said, “We were watched by five million people last month. How many sports are not seen by so many?

“We're entertaining, and we're entertaining everyone during the lockdown, and we will continue to do so.

However, Mr Harker, who runs the pub, hit back on those who complained and insisted no rules were broken

However, Mr Harker, who runs the pub, hit back on those who complained and insisted no rules were broken

“So I am not bullied into not doing events. I don't really appreciate phone calls to question them and ask if it's a sport if that's a matter of opinion.

"Other people's opinions are irrelevant, entertaining, safe, and as long as government guidelines state what we can do, we will."

Despite the inquiries, the council confirmed that no further action would be taken against the pub.

Why the landlord did NOT break the blocking rules

Craig Harker's Pub, The George Pub, was used as the setting for a filmed dining contest.

The venues may be opened for a small number of activities, including for top athletes to train and compete.

Mr Harker says he followed the guidelines in classifying competitive food as a top sport.

He told Teesside Live, “On Saturday we held a British Eating League event in the pub during the national lockdown.

& # 39; The venue was closed to the public and only the TV production team and athletes were allowed to enter the grounds.

"Government guidelines state that top-level sport can continue during the lockdown and that there is no higher league for competitive eating than the British Eating League."

Mr. Harker did not sell food or drinks during the competition, so he did not violate the ban rules that pubs and restaurants are not allowed to sell products.

A Stockton Council spokesman said, “Our licensing team has received a complaint regarding the delivery of food on the premises that is currently restricted by national lockdowns.

"The officers investigated and quickly determined that there was no licensable activity on the premises at this point. Therefore, no further licensing action will be taken."

A Stockton Council spokesman said, “Our licensing team has received a complaint regarding the delivery of food on the premises that is currently restricted by national lockdowns.

"The officers investigated and quickly determined that there was no licensable activity on the premises at this point. Therefore, no further licensing action will be taken."

Mr. Harker is no stranger to controversy and even disguised himself as Hitler in a marketing stunt three years ago.

And more recently, in June, he posted a brutally honest job advertisement in hopes of hiring new employees.

In the ad, potential applicants were warned that they would work for an "a *** ****".

In 2017, he came under fire for a provocative social media post that used Nazi images.

Mr. Harker said controversial posts promoting The Buck Inn in Sadberge, County Durham were "cheeky, a little funny" and that he would continue to market "like us" as long as people visit his pubs.

It's not the first time the 30-year-old has been criticized by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) after filing a complaint about an ad for another of his venues asking customers to parm your ex Face Slapping 'was confirmed last year.

In September, his controversial Facebook post for a "German Grub Night" included the sentences "Graham Ze Chef", "Don't Mention Ze War" and a black and white cartoon soldier wearing a swastika and a Nazi Greeting executes ASA ruled.

The Buck Inn defended the post, claiming it was a quote from the hit television series Fawlty Towers that was meant to be "light-hearted and humorous" – and not to promote the NSDAP or mock war history in any way.

Harker told the newspaper, "It was all a wink, a bit of fun – these are things I saw as a kid, things like & # 39; Allo & # 39; Allo.

They asked me why I liked people's comments on this, but we like all of the comments on the page.

& # 39; The night was a great success, everyone was dressed up like Oktoberfest.

During the night I disguised myself as Hitler. The locals loved it.

"The bratwurst curry was very well received, everyone loved the German food."

His pub's social media post promoting Parmo Night also angered domestic violence groups last year.

Harker added, “I wasn't surprised that there were complaints. It always bothers someone when we do a bit of marketing.

Hundreds of thousands of people saw (the Buck Inn) Post and there were three complaints.

& # 39; The (George) post has been viewed by 6.5 MILLION – and we only received one complaint.

& # 39; Both pubs are doing well.

"As long as people keep coming here, we'll continue marketing the way we do."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns