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The police ordered the police dog to attack a black man who was on his knees with his hands up


This is the horrific moment when a police dog was ordered to attack a black man who was on his knees with hands in the air and was injured so badly that his leg could be amputated.

Salt Lake City police crawled to Jeffery Ryans, 36, after a phone call was made when someone overheard him arguing with his wife, who had previously filed a domestic violence protection order against him.

Ryans says he had been back home smoking outside for several weeks before leaving for his job as a train engineer when Utah police used excessive force on April 24.

Ryans – an Alabama native who has lived in Utah for 15 years – says police in the city treat black people differently. As he prepares to sue the department, his lawyer says he was assaulted in such a violent manner for being black.

"I felt like a chew toy," Ryans told the Salt Lake Tribune. "I didn't know why this happened to me. That went through my head. Why?"

Jeffery Ryans is suing the Salt Lake City Police Department after being attacked by a K9

Police ordered the dog to launch an attack on Ryans and brutally injure his leg outside his Utah home on April 24

Police ordered the dog to launch an attack on Ryans and brutally injure his leg outside his Utah home on April 24

Ryan's lawyers say medical professionals haven't ruled out the possibility that amputation might be required due to the severity of his injuries

Ryan's lawyers say medical professionals haven't ruled out the possibility that amputation might be required due to the severity of his injuries

“What is different between the two of us that could make this happen to him, but I couldn't imagine what was happening to me? Nobody ever showed up at my house, ”attorney Gabriel White told The Salt Lake Tribune.

You shared the police Body camera footage amid discussions of racial injustice following the George Floyd murder, which occurred a month later.

In the clip, the police asks his wife: “Shouldn't he be here? Because he has a protection order? & # 39;

She replies that he was there when she got home.

In a white top and dark trousers, officers frighten Ryan as they beam their torches and shout, "Get on the ground or you will get something."

A dog barks violently as Ryans puts his hands in the air and calmly replies, "I'm just going to work."

Officers rush into Ryan's back yard when it is alleged that he is trying to jump over the fence.

They repeatedly order him to get on the ground and threaten that the dog will bite him if he doesn't.

Although Ryans kneels on the floor with his hands up, the officers order the dog Tuco to launch his attack.

They repeatedly instruct the dog to "hit" and Tuco rushes forward to Maul Ryan's leg.

"I'm down, why are you biting me?" he pleads and asks the officials to "stop".

Even so, the officers appear to be ordering the dog to continue its attack.

Ryans kneels on the ground and raises his hands to comply with the officers' instructions, but Ryans, who moved to town 15 years ago, has said the police treat black people there differently

Ryans kneels on the ground and raises his hands to comply with the officers' instructions, but Ryans, who moved to town 15 years ago, has said the police treat black people there differently

Ryan's bloody left lower leg can be seen above. He says the injuries he sustained resulted in multiple surgeries, a lost job, and means he can't do as much sports with his children

Ryan's bloody left lower leg can be seen above. He says the injuries he sustained resulted in multiple surgeries, a lost job, and means he can't do as much sports with his children

Tuco is seen clamping his jaw around Ryan's leg as he screams in pain.

Officers praise the & # 39; good boy & # 39; while Ryan rolls over on his front in agony.

He yells, "Why are you doing this?" and asks: "What have I done?"

The officers handcuff Ryan while he puts the police down while Tuco holds on to his leg.

"I just got my clothes to work," he says.

After Tuco withdraws from his attack, an officer pats the dog on the side and says, "Good boy".

An officer is looking for a paramedic for a "dog bite on the leg".

Then he says to Ryans, "Bro, you're listening great now, you weren't listening great a minute ago."

Ryans said the devastating injuries he sustained to his leg resulted in multiple surgeries, a lost job, and the inability to exercise with his children as much.

He told the Salt Lake Tribune, “I didn't fight. I just cooperated. We went through this. We saw that. Always cooperate with the police no matter what. & # 39;

Ryans has since taken the first steps to file a lawsuit against the Salt Lake City Police Department.

In a statement of a lawsuit on July 20, his lawyers said Ryans had nerve damage, tendon damage, infection, and was still having difficulty walking.

They say doctors haven't ruled out the possibility of his leg having to be amputated.

The city has 60 days to respond to the notice, or Ryans will sue.

Jeffery Ryans points to his ankle as he speaks at his attorney's office on Aug. 5 about his encounter with the Salt Lake City police. They say doctors have not ruled out the need to amputate his leg

Jeffery Ryans points to his ankle as he speaks at his attorney's office on Aug. 5 about his encounter with the Salt Lake City police. They say doctors have not ruled out the need to amputate his leg

Ryans' attorneys, Daniel Garner and Gabriel White, allege the officers used unnecessary force because Ryan was black

Ryans' attorneys, Daniel Garner and Gabriel White, allege the officers used unnecessary force because Ryan was black

“People need to know that black lives are important. Everyone is important, but you can't just treat people differently because of their religion or skin color, ”said Ryans. He filed a notice of his intention to sue on July 20th

“People need to know that black lives are important. Everyone is important, but you can't just treat people differently because of their religion or skin color, ”said Ryans. He filed a notice of his intention to sue on July 20th

Ryans' attorneys Daniel Garner and Gabriel White allege the officers used unnecessary force.

White claims the officers reacted because Ryan was black.

Police say they wanted to arrest Ryans for violating a protection order from his wife that meant he should not be home.

It's not clear who called the police to Ryan's home, but the man said it was not his wife.

Court records show he will be charged with domestic violence in a December incident.

But Ryans claims his wife told him the protection order had been lifted but it was still pending.

He said he was back home weeks before the police called and didn't know that her request for the order to be lifted was pending.

Ryans is now charged with violating this protection order, although the court dates have not yet been set.

He said he wanted to tell his story at a time when people are supporting the Black Lives Matter movement and protesting against police brutality.

“People need to know that black lives are important. Everyone is important, but you can't just treat people differently because of their religion or skin color, ”said Ryans. "I developed myself to get where I am right now. I should have the same respect as others. We don't get it."

They shared the police body camera footage amid discussions of racial injustices following the murder of George Floyd (pictured), which occurred a month later

They shared the police body camera footage amid discussions of racial injustices following the murder of George Floyd (pictured), which occurred a month later

Protesters are seen outside the Cottonwood Heights Police Department in Cottonwood Heights, Utah on Monday August 3. Groups of dueling protesters faced each other outside the Salt Lake City Police Department in response to the use of force by officials in a protest the night before that arrested eight people

Protesters are seen outside the Cottonwood Heights Police Department in Cottonwood Heights, Utah on Monday August 3. Groups of dueling protesters faced each other outside the Salt Lake City Police Department in response to the use of force by officials in a protest the night before that arrested eight people

The Salt Lake City Police Department responded to reports from the Salt Lake Tribune.

They said, “Since there is litigation, we cannot go into the details of the case.

“Although this incident occurred in April, no internal affairs complaint was ever made. Upon learning of the situation this morning, our department immediately opened an internal affairs investigation to determine if the use of force was within guidelines.

This investigation takes into account the entirety of the events that night.

"As with any complaint about the use of force, the Salt Lake City Civilian Review Board has an opportunity to conduct its own investigation."

Mayor Erin Mendenhall also urged Police Commissioner Mike Brown to investigate Tuesday evening: "Although I am unable to fully comment on the pending litigation, I have communicated the urgency to finalize the internal affairs investigation into Mr. Jeffery to Ryans and am so transparent as possible to the public about the process and the results. & # 39;

The mayor signed an executive order on August 3 that made certain violent practices in the department part of official policy.

The SLCPD officers must now use de-escalation techniques before using force. De-escalation tactics are no longer suggested or preferred – they are mandatory before force is used to carry out an arrest, unless it is inappropriate, "reads one of seven actions.

Officials will use effective communication techniques to achieve voluntary compliance. Officials are expected not to contribute to a situation that could lead to the use of force by taking unnecessary, overly aggressive measures. "

Two levels of supervisor are required to investigate any use of force, not just those that lead to injury.

Officials who witness violence they believe to be illegal must intervene.

The police chief must implement the new policy by September 5th at the latest.

Police were scrutinized more than ever when widespread anti-brutality protests spread across the world following the murder of unarmed black man George Floyd in May.

All four officers involved in Floyd's arrest were released by Minneapolis police.

Lane, Kueng and Thao are charged with assisting and facilitating second degree murder and second degree manslaughter.

Chauvin is charged with second degree murder, third degree murder, and manslaughter. All four were fired.

Locals said they wanted to protest Ryan's case this coming Sunday.

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