ENTERTAINMENT

The police are taking action against the murderous husband who strangled his wife with a bathrobe when he was imprisoned for 22 years


A murderer who strangled his wife with a dressing gown was sentenced to at least 22 years in prison.

Ian Hamer, 54, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison on Friday after a three-week trial in Hull Crown Court.

The former manager had evaded arrest for 24 hours after strangling Joanne Hamer with a dressing gown in her home in Worlaby, North Lincolnshire.

Ian Hamer, 54, (pictured right) was convicted Friday after a three-week trial in Hull Crown Court and was imprisoned for life following the murder of Ms. Joanne (left).

After he committed the crime, he went to drink and was discovered and followed by a police officer, who attacked and arrested him.

He had exposed Joanne to domestic violence for over two years, controlling her every move, spying on her, and isolating her from friends and family.

Joanne was a distinguished North Lincolnshire Council official, popular with colleagues and referred to by the family as a "beautiful, kind, and loving woman."

Hamer had claimed Joanne was untrue to him and had affairs, but days before she died she texted another woman to arrange a meeting.

Claiming he was "mocked" by Joanne before killing her in her home, Hamer said she told him one of her daughters was not his – something for which there was no evidence.

The former manager had evaded arrest for 24 hours after strangling Joanne Hamer with a dressing gown in her home in Worlaby, North Lincolnshire

The former manager had evaded arrest for 24 hours after strangling Joanne Hamer with a dressing gown in her home in Worlaby, North Lincolnshire

After Hamer had committed the crime, he called Joanne's terminally ill mother and told her that Joanne had a bad throat and would not call her that day, which the judge described as "sadistic".

Then he went into a pub and laughed and joked as he went on a drink and drug frenzy.

He then wandered the North Lincolnshire countryside before being found and arrested in a parking lot in Barton-upon-Humber five miles away.

He was brought to the ground in the parking lot off Finkle Lane by a lone policeman who sat on top of him for more than five minutes after asking for assistance.

Uniformed officers assigned to search for Hamer arrived, and he was arrested and taken to a police car.

Shortly after his arrest, Hamer said, "I want to say it's manslaughter through decreased responsibility due to insanity."

During the sentencing, a statement by Joanne's deceased mother, who died in August last year, was read out by her son and Joanne's twin brother.

She said: “Jo & # 39; s death broke our hearts.

Ian took a loving daughter from her mother who cared for her and a mother who broke the family from her children.

“She will never see her children get married or see the grandchildren she wanted. Your daughters will miss the love and support only a mother can give.

& # 39; Jo was a beautiful, kind, and loving woman and always saw the best in people. She stayed with Ian even though she was asked to leave him.

He went to drink after committing the crime and was discovered and pursued by a police officer who attacked and arrested him (picture)

He went to drink after committing the crime and was discovered and pursued by a police officer who attacked and arrested him (picture)

“I find it difficult to understand how someone can kill someone like Jo.

Judge Peter Kelson QC described Hamer as a "danger to women".

He said, “It is clear that everyone who knew Joanne knew her as a faithful, loving, caring, long-suffering woman who was true to her vows.

“She couldn't have worked harder on the marriage. You were a haughty, violent, domineering, aggressive husband and father.

“Your neighbor thought you were a man who didn't like women. Your stalking behavior is not due to your love for Joanne.

You told a psychiatrist that you never stopped loving Joanne, but I don't think your behavior came from love, but from a desire to control her and your love of money.

“You said you were going to say it was manslaughter based on decreased responsibility due to insanity.

Shortly after his arrest, Hamer said, "I want to say it's manslaughter through decreased responsibility due to insanity."

Shortly after his arrest, Hamer said, "I want to say it's manslaughter through decreased responsibility due to insanity."

"Well, Mr. Hamer, that was your last act of control and manipulation for many, many years."

Screams from Joanne's family members rang out through the court as Hamer was led to the cells below by a port official and showed no emotion or remorse for the life he supposedly loved but taken.

In response to Hamer's verdict, Senior Investigator Detective Chief Inspector Christine Calvert said, “My thoughts today stay with Joanne's family and friends, and I would like to thank you for your understanding and patience during the investigation and trial.

Joanne was a kind, loving mother and wife who endured years of mental and physical abuse from her abusive husband.

“I hope today's conclusion will make Joanne's family feel that a certain sense of justice has been achieved for their loved one.

& # 39; Hamer is a violent man who has shown no remorse for taking the life of the woman he should love and care for.

Joanne (pictured) was a distinguished North Lincolnshire Council public health officer, popular with colleagues and described by the family as a "beautiful, kind, and loving woman."

Joanne (pictured) was a distinguished North Lincolnshire Council public health officer, popular with colleagues and described by the family as a "beautiful, kind, and loving woman."

Joanne had suffered mental and physical abuse from Hamer monitoring her phones, checking who she was talking to and where she was going, and controlling her movements even when she was at work.

“It's something we take incredibly seriously, and I encourage anyone who is a victim or has a concern about a loved one to get in touch with us.

“We would always encourage anyone who feels they are a victim of domestic violence to come forward, to come forward.

"You can call our non-emergency 101 line or anonymously contact the Crimestoppers independent charity on 0800 555 111. In an emergency, always dial 999."

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