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The police are fighting to disperse the crowds celebrating on the street at 10 p.m. according to the new Covid rules


Crowds of night owls flocked to the streets last night after bars and pubs kicked them out at 10 p.m., gathered in large crowds, and violated social distancing rules.

In Soho, London, huge crowds of Saturday night drinkers were seen walking on empty streets while others rushed to buy liquor from licenses in Leeds after newly imposed rules meant the venues were closed prematurely.

Meanwhile, a huge line of people formed outside Tesco Express in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and many chose to keep the night going with cans and bottles bought in a supermarket.

In the popular waterfront district of Bristol, in the streets of the nightlife hotspot Newcastle and in the student city of York, crowds of alcohol also gathered.

The influx of happy party-goers increased the risk of spreading the virus even more than they huddled on public transport – after Uber rates rose 2.6 percent due to increased demand in London.

The Prime Minister's decision to impose the 10 p.m. curfew has been criticized after it was revealed that the move was not endorsed by Sage – the panel of scientific experts chaired by Sir Patrick Vallance.

According to the Daily Telegraph, wise members are increasingly frustrated that they are being outvoted while being scapegoated for the tougher measures.

A former director of the World Health Organization, Professor Karol Sikora, also raised concerns, saying, “Where is the evidence? Closing a little early is going to hurt so many business owners. & # 39;

Wise scholars are reportedly calling on the government to make its advice public in order to exempt them from any involvement in dealing with a pub curfew.

A huge line of people formed in front of the Tesco Express in Portsmouth, Hampshire. Many chose to keep the night going with cans and bottles bought in a supermarket

Police officers were on patrol in Soho, London, before closing after pubs and restaurants were put on curfew at 10 p.m. to combat the surge in coronavirus cases

Police officers were on patrol in Soho, London, before closure after pubs and restaurants were put on curfew at 10 p.m. to combat the surge in coronavirus cases

Groups of revelers were in Soho, London last night when Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there had been "an acceleration in Covid-19 cases across the country".

Groups of revelers were in Soho, London last night when Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there had been "an acceleration in Covid-19 cases across the country".

In York, huge crowds gathered in the streets to keep the party going after restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

In York, huge crowds gathered in the streets to keep the party going after restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

In their numbers there were police officers trying to clear the crowd of Londoners to take to the streets in the city's West End

In their number there were police officers trying to clear the crowd of Londoners to take to the streets in the city's West End

The influx of happy party-goers increased the risk of spreading the virus even more as they huddled together on public transport

The influx of happy party-goers increased the risk of spreading the virus even more as they huddled together on public transport

The 10pm curfew also brought large crowds onto the streets of Bristol. Hardly anyone wore a mask and many appeared to be closer than two meters apart

The 10 p.m. curfew also brought large crowds onto the streets of Bristol. Hardly anyone wore a mask and many appeared to be closer than two meters apart

After the 10 p.m. curfew, many revelers were seen crowded in front of a snack bar in Newcastle

After the curfew at 10 p.m., many night owls in Newcastle were crowded in front of a snack bar

To make matters worse, party-goers wanting to return home after the curfew have been exposed to the Uber price hikes

To make matters worse, party-goers wanting to return home after the curfew have been exposed to the Uber price hikes

After the 10 p.m. curfew, people gathered on the London Underground. Many chose to use public transport as Uber prices rose

After the 10 p.m. curfew, people gathered on the London Underground. Many chose to use public transport as Uber prices rose

After the curfew at 10 p.m., masked partygoers stood on a platform in the London Underground

After the curfew at 10 p.m., masked partygoers stood on a platform on the London Underground

A group of women carrying their drinks in Soho, London after pubs and restaurants closed their doors at 10pm

A group of women carrying their drinks in Soho, London after pubs and restaurants closed their doors at 10pm

Crowds walk down St Mary Street in Cardiff, Wales after the pubs close at 10pm on September 26th

Crowds walk down St Mary Street in Cardiff, Wales after the pubs close at 10pm on September 26th

A bar employee clears a table in the street before work in Soho, London, while people brave the cold to dine out

A bar employee clears a table on the street before work in Soho, London, while people brave the cold to eat out

It is because households in the Welsh town of Llanelli were banned from entering each other's houses and gardens from 6 p.m. The country's two largest cities, Cardiff and Swansea, followed suit. Residents are also prohibited from entering or leaving the areas without a "reasonable excuse".

It comes after lockdowns have already been imposed in much of the North East and North West of England. More than a quarter of the UK is subject to more severe restrictions, including half of the Welsh population.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there has been "an acceleration in Covid-19 cases across the country, particularly in the northwest and northeast".

"Working with our science and public health experts and local leaders, we stand ready to take swift and decisive action to reduce virus transmission and protect communities," he said. "I recognize the stress and impact of these additional measures on our daily lives, but we must act together and quickly to fight infection."

Meanwhile, London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the capital is at "a very worrying high" with rising Covid-19 cases, NHS 111 calls, hospital admissions and intensive care patients.

This group of women headed for downtown Newcastle when the 10pm curfew forced many revelers onto the streets at once

This group of women headed for downtown Newcastle when the 10pm curfew forced many revelers onto the streets at once

Police were on site in Newcastle city center when the new 10 p.m. curfew went into effect to prevent a surge in Covid cases

Police were on site in Newcastle city center when the new 10 p.m. curfew went into effect to prevent a surge in Covid cases

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the capital was at a "very worrying high". The curfew, which forced bars like this one in Soho to close at 10 p.m., is designed to stem the rise in cases

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the capital was at a "very worrying high". The curfew, which forced bars like this one in Soho to close at 10 p.m., is designed to stem the rise in cases

People queuing outside Compton News supermarket in Soho, London after a 10 p.m. curfew in pubs and restaurants

People queuing outside Compton News supermarket in Soho, London after a 10 p.m. curfew in pubs and restaurants

Night owls in Leeds no longer had a license to buy alcohol once the bars and restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

Night owls in Leeds no longer had a license to buy alcohol once the bars and restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

Two people wearing masks are seen after attending an off license after a night out in Leeds city center

Two people wearing masks are seen after attending an off license after a night out in Leeds city center

The night was not over for these three guys, although pubs and bars closed at 10 p.m. under new Covid restrictions

The night was not over for these three guys, although pubs and bars closed at 10 p.m. under new Covid restrictions

The UK's coronavirus R rate could now be up to 1.5, government scientific advisors warned on Friday after spikes across all regions of the country

The UK's coronavirus R rate could now be up to 1.5, government scientific advisors warned on Friday after spikes across all regions of the country

A woman was drinking Prosecco from the bottle when a male companion smoked a cigarette and others laughed as they strolled into town

A woman is running down a street in Leeds

A woman was drinking Prosecco from a bottle when a male companion smoked a cigarette and another ran down the street without shoes

Meanwhile, in Soho, in the West End of London, three women were pictured with their face covers on the floor outside a bar

Meanwhile, in Soho, in the West End of London, three women were pictured with their face covers on the floor outside a bar

The crowds were out in trendy Soho in the West End of London on Saturday evening before the new curfew at 10 p.m.

The crowds were out in trendy Soho in the West End of London on Saturday evening before the new curfew at 10 p.m.

Three women smile as they take a selfie in Leeds as they head into town ahead of the new 10 p.m. curfew to help slow the spread of the coronavirus

Three women smile as they take a selfie in Leeds as they head into town ahead of the new 10 p.m. curfew to help slow the spread of the coronavirus

This couple did not let the 10pm curfew tarnish and was spotted playing around in Leeds city center last night

This couple did not let the 10pm curfew tarnish and was spotted playing around in Leeds city center last night

Public Health England data shows that only a handful of London's 32 boroughs have sustained increases in infections - including Redbridge, Hounslow, Barking, and Dagenham and Enfield. The data is due to be updated on Friday but does give an indication of which districts are struggling the most

Public Health England data shows that only a handful of London's 32 boroughs have sustained increases in infections – including Redbridge, Hounslow, Barking, and Dagenham and Enfield. The data is due to be updated on Friday but does give an indication of which districts are struggling the most

Rolling 7-day rate of new Covid-19 cases in hotspot areas in England

In Burnley, 228 new cases were recorded in the seven days ended September 23, the equivalent of 256.4 per 100,000 people.

Burnley has the highest rate in England, of 145.1 in the seven days leading up to September 16.

Liverpool has the second highest rate of 131.1 to 243.8 with 1,214 new cases.

Knowsley ranks third, where the rate rose from 132.6 to 241.9 with 365 new cases.

Other areas where the 7-day rates have risen sharply are:

  • Newcastle upon Tyne (from 87.2 to 228.8 with 693 new cases)
  • Pendle (from 97.7 to 203.0 with 187 new cases)
  • Sunderland (from 78.9 to 180.0, with 500 new cases)
  • Halton (from 125.2 to 214.0 with 277 new cases)
  • Sefton (from 74.2 to 162.8, with 450 new cases)

Health bosses are reportedly considering plans to make face masks mandatory in most workplaces to help contain the spread of the virus. Office workers are expected to be exempt from the measures while seated, but must wear a mask in corridors, elevators or common areas.

As cases continue to rise, a surge in cases and hospital admissions has put London on the national watchlist for bans as the capital's R-rate is between 1.2 and 1.5 – the same level as the Northwest, Northeast and of the USA Midlands, all of which have been hit by additional Covid-19 measures.

The Mayor of London, Mr Khan, has already called for a ban on mixing people in each other's households, saying in a conversation with the Prime Minister that "if you are late we are in a north-east, north-west situation , Birmingham ". .

Hundreds of students in Manchester have now been isolated after 127 tested positive for the virus on the Birley campus and Cambridge Halls of Manchester Metropolitan University, as the rate of spread in the city went from 93.2 a week ago to 185.6 per 100,000 rises.

Number 10's panel of experts, SAGE, also warned that the virus reproductive rate could be as high as that for the UK as a whole. This is the advisory panel's highest forecast since it began tracking the growth of the disease in June, and is slightly above last week's estimate of 1.1-1.4.

If the R-rate – the number of people each infected patient passes on the disease to – stays above one, the outbreak will continue to rise and cases will continue to rise, putting the risk of local Covid-19 outbreaks out of control advised and become regional and even national problems.

Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson said the scenes in Liverpool last night showed that the curfew was not working. After crowds gathered in the city center, the queues for buses and licenses were extremely full after 10pm

Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson said the scenes in Liverpool last night showed the curfew was not working. After crowds gathered in the city center, the queues for buses and licenses were extremely full after they stopped at 10pm

This angry social media user announced that people will simply go out early and start their evenings, making the curfew ineffective

This angry social media user announced that people will simply go out early and start their evenings, making the curfew ineffective

Crowds gathered at the Oxford Circus reportedly had an "impromptu party," according to this video posted on social media

Crowds gathered at the Oxford Circus reportedly had an "impromptu party," according to this video posted on social media

While on patrol in Soho, London, when the curfew went into effect at 10 p.m., police officers faced a large crowd while on patrol

While on patrol in Soho, London, when the curfew went into effect at 10 p.m., police officers faced a large crowd while on patrol

Police officers are working to disperse large groups of people who have gathered near the harbor in Bristol to drink and dance

Police officers are working to disperse large groups of people who have gathered near the harbor in Bristol, drinking and dancing

Many night owls took their own drinks to party on Bristol Harbor when bars, pubs and restaurants closed at 10pm

Many night owls took their own drinks to party on Bristol Harbor when bars, pubs and restaurants closed at 10pm

Some people in the crowd did not wear masks, like this one in Bristol

Some people in the crowd did not wear masks, like this one in Bristol

Policemen like the one pictured here were trying to disperse the large crowds that had gathered in Bristol after 10 p.m. last night

Policemen like the one pictured here were trying to disperse the large crowds that had gathered in Bristol after 10 p.m. last night

Two people in pink and blue wigs are seen among the crowds at Bristol Harbor last night

Two people in pink and blue wigs can be seen among the crowds at Bristol Harbor last night

These groups chose to sit by the water at Bristol Harbor after restaurants, pubs and bars closed their doors at 10pm

These groups chose to sit by the water at Bristol Harbor after restaurants, pubs and bars closed their doors at 10pm

There are many bars and restaurants in Bristol's harbor district (pictured), all of which had to close at 10 p.m. according to new rules

There are many bars and restaurants in Bristol's harbor district (pictured), all of which had to close at 10 p.m. according to new rules

Large crowds, like the one pictured here in Bristol, could be seen across the UK last night when the 10pm curfew went into effect

Large crowds, like the one pictured here in Bristol, could be seen across the UK last night when the 10pm curfew went into effect

These night owls sat on the floor next to a few of their own bottles while the group chatted and some smoked in Bristol

These night owls sat on the floor next to a few of their own bottles while the group chatted and some smoked in Bristol

As coronavirus infections increase in the UK:

  • Boris Johnson's 10pm curfew was based on "back-of-fag package calculations" and was not endorsed by SAGE.
  • The restrictions imposed in March could kill 75,000 in five years, including 31,000 non-Covid-related deaths. This is evident from documents submitted to SAGE.
  • Unions are calling for personal university tuition to be interrupted as 3,000 students are banned.
  • MailOnline analysis shows that the UK's outbreak began to rise after the reopening of Super Saturday.
  • The Wales lighthouse laboratory, due to open in August and run thousands of tests, is still empty.
  • Sadiq Khan calls for Londoners to be prevented from visiting friends and family.

Matt Hancock said the strict lockdown measures are in line with those in Leicester, where they have successfully suppressed spikes in some cases, and in the West Midlands.

"This is going to be difficult news for people in these areas who profoundly affect their daily lives," he said. "These decisions are not taken lightly, and such measures are no longer reviewed and implemented longer than necessary."

Office workers "wear masks in corridors, elevators and common areas"

Health chiefs have been reported to be considering plans to introduce face masks in offices.

The stricter measures would mean that employees do not have to wear a mask when sitting, but have to wear one in corridors, elevators or common rooms.

The rules will be part of a broader crackdown on indoor workspaces, with data from Public Health England showing 18 percent of the 729 respiratory disease outbreaks recorded in the week ended September 13th. They also show that only five percent occurred in grocery stores, 45 percent percent in nursing homes and 21 percent in schools.

A minister told the Daily Express: “The rules are expanding. We have to accept that this will be a new way of life that will be around for a while and that we will get used to.

"The fines send a strong, clear message about how to behave."

Further restrictions are expected to be rolled out across the country in the coming weeks if the 6pm and 10pm curfew does not reduce the number of newly reported cases.

Local authorities have already started banning mixing in other households and there is increasing demand for this measure to be rolled out across the UK amid fears that lessons will still be learned from March.

The tightened restrictions occur after an increase in cases in the areas. The latest seven-day Covid-19 rate in Leeds was 113.3 per 100,000 people, according to government data, while Leeds health director Victoria Eaton said a positive test rate of 8.4 percent.

The 7-day moving average in Blackpool rose from 48.8 per 100,000 a week ago to 69.6 per 100,000 on Friday, the government's coronavirus dashboard shows. In Wigan, the rate has increased to 122.6 per 100,000 people, while in Stockport it has increased to 77.4 per 100,000 people.

On Thursday, Cardiff Council chairman Huw Thomas said 38.2 cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 people had occurred in the capital in the past five days. Swansea's rate is 49.8.

In the past seven days, Cardiff's positivity rate has hit 3.8 percent, exceeding the Welsh government's amber threshold of 2.5 percent – part of the traffic light roadmap strategy to fight the pandemic.

Infectious disease modeling expert Professor Graham Medley, member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE), warned that 100 coronavirus deaths would occur daily in a few weeks.

Professor Medley told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the new restrictions will not stop deaths but will keep the toll from getting higher.

"A level of 10,000 (cases) that we see now means that in three or four weeks we will see 100 deaths a day," he said. “To prevent this process from picking up again, we need to ensure that the transmission is interrupted now as this doubling time continues. The things we are doing now won't stop 100 people from dying every day, but they will keep them from going much higher. & # 39;

Leeds City Council chair Judith Blake said there was "a lot of confusion" and "ambiguity" this morning as the draconian rules took effect in the city.

She told BBC Breakfast: “We know that the restrictions don't just work on their own, but must be part of a whole series of actions in the city.

A police officer leads revelers to downtown Newcastle, where people brave the cold for a night on the town

A police officer leads revelers to downtown Newcastle, where people brave the cold for a night on the town

This group posed for a picture during an evening in Newcastle, where pubs, bars and restaurants closed at 10pm

This group posed for a picture during an evening in Newcastle, where pubs, bars and restaurants closed at 10pm

At 10 p.m., police officers move in to prevent other night owls from entering the takeaway at Bigg Market in Newcastle city center

At 10 p.m., police officers move in to prevent other night owls from entering the takeaway at Bigg Market in Newcastle city center

Police and bouncers tried to control the crowd in bustling Newcastle city center last night amid the new Covid curfew

Police and bouncers tried to control the crowd in bustling Newcastle city center last night amid the new Covid curfew

“The important message that we know from other areas is that there is a lot of confusion and ambiguity, especially in areas where there are different rules in one district and the neighboring district has another. This has to be a wake up call for people.

“If things go on as they are, I can't see how the government won't be forced to take more action that will have more impact on our lives, on our ability to go out and do the things we do need to do to keep the economy going. & # 39;

Leeds' director of public health, Ms. Eaton, told reporters last night that the spread of the virus in the city is "very dynamic" and that "it is clear that we have very widespread community transmission" .

& # 39; We have high rates in some of our student areas that we've been increasing recently. It is clearly not just a problem for student areas, "she said before warning incidents started surfacing in all age groups and compliance with self-isolation rules was low."

Daughter stuck in Wales after flying 9,500 miles from Australia to be at the bedside of her dying father

Pearl Findlay-James with her father Patrick James

Pearl Findlay-James with her father Patrick James

A daughter is stranded in Wales due to coronavirus restrictions after flying 9,500 miles from Australia to say goodbye to her father.

Pearl Findlay-James was allowed to leave Victoria State for compassionate reasons and be at her father's bed in Pembroke Dock in West Wales, but cannot come home now.

She had already paid for a ticket to Melbourne for AUS $ 8,900 (£ 5,000) but had to pay an additional AUS $ 4,000 (£ 2,200) for a new ticket to Sydney after the flight was canceled. She will have to spend an additional AUS $ 3,000 (£ 1,600) on quarantine measures when she eventually returns home.

Her father Patrick James died four days after arriving in the UK.

“My whole family is in Australia. My husband, my children and my 10 grandchildren. It's time to go home, ”she said.

“The UK is going into the second wave and I am concerned that it will be even more difficult to get home.

“I was kidding my daughters – you'd better get ready to cook the Christmas turkey because I don't know if I'll be there.

“I can take to my grave that I sat and held my father while he went to God.

"Nobody can ever take that away from me, no matter how my journey is now."

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford has urged the people of Cardiff to act as if the new restrictions are in place, even though they won't take effect until Sunday evening.

He told LBC that police enforcement is the last resort, adding, “If there are people who are clearly deliberately breaking the law, you need to enforce it.

& # 39; Yes, with fines if necessary. But for us this is the last resort, not the first resort. In Caerphilly (the first area in Wales to be closed) we worked very, very well together. My experience is that people want to do the right thing.

The country's health minister, Vaughan Gething, warned the spiraling infections were akin to late February, when "we stopped large chunks of NHS activity about two weeks later."

He added, “We have seen a sharp increase in cases from exposure to indoor households in all areas where we comply with local restrictions.

"That has expanded to include licensed premises where people don't follow the rules."

The latest data for Cardiff on the government's dashboard shows the 7-day moving average of cases rose from 11.6 a week ago to 21.9 per 100,000 on September 18. And in Swansea, they more than tripled from 6.4 per 100,000 on September 11 to 19.4 a week later.

Blackpool has been exempt from the restrictions imposed in the rest of Lancashire to this day and the seaside resort has now been adapted to its neighbors.

Blackpool South Conservative MP Scott Benton said the area initially avoided restrictions as its infection rate was 23 cases per 100,000. However, by Wednesday this had risen to 63 cases per 100,000, which is still below the average for the whole of Lancashire, but represents a significant increase.

Mr Benton said on Facebook: “The spike in cases is particularly high in areas north of Blackpool and there is evidence that this is due to intra-community transmission rather than tourism (which explains why our local infection rate has remained low compared to other areas in the northwest, although visitors come here all summer).

& # 39; It is important that we take sensible steps now to reduce the transfer rate, which is why these new restrictions are being applied.

"Nobody wants a second full lockdown and this idea behind these new rules is to slow the spread of Covid-19 so we don't end up in a position where a full lockdown needs to be considered."

Wigan reportedly put restrictions on after they were first eased on Aug. 26 as case numbers rise again. Stockport also sees restrictions after a ban on mixing in each other's households was lifted on Sept. 2.

The health chiefs announced 6,874 more Covid-19 infections and 34 more deaths on Friday. The daily number of cases is a record high, bringing the total number of cases to 423,237, despite millions of Britons undiagnosed during the first wave of the pandemic due to the government's lackluster testing regime.

Government figures show the number of victims who succumbed to the life-threatening infection is now 29 to 73 percent higher than the 17 average last Friday. But they are Far from the 1,000 recorded daily during the darkest weeks of the crisis in March and April. However, SAGE warned that the small number of deaths does not reflect how fast the outbreak is growing.

Hospital admissions – another measure of the severity of an outbreak – have also risen again. 314 newly infected patients in need of NHS treatment in England on Wednesday were up from 183 the week before.

Meanwhile, in Liverpool, crowds moved downtown to spend an evening with friends as the city has so far avoided a local lockdown

Meanwhile, in Liverpool, crowds moved downtown to spend an evening with friends as the city has so far avoided a local lockdown

And people also came to downtown Birmingham (pictured) walking to a bar on a cold night in the country's second city

And people also came to downtown Birmingham (pictured) walking to a bar on a cold night in the country's second city

A man gives a piggyback ride to a woman in Birmingham city center

Another woman crouches on the floor after going out overnight

One man piggybacks a woman (left) in Birmingham city center while another crouches on the floor after going out for the night (right).

London is believed to be on the verge of a localized lockdown. Official government data shows the capital recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday - double what it was last week

London is believed to be on the verge of a localized lockdown. Official government data shows the capital recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday – double what it was last week

Covid-19 hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in 14 days. The seven day average increased from 11 on September 2 to 33.4 by September 18. However, the number of hospital stays in the city is still far from the 700+ at the height of the pandemic in the spring and only marginally higher than in early July (around 25) when the country was considered safe to reopen

Covid-19 hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in 14 days. The seven day average increased from 11 on September 2 to 33.4 by September 18. However, the number of hospital stays in the city is still far from the 700+ at the height of the pandemic in the spring and only marginally higher than in early July (around 25) when the country was considered safe to reopen

Scientists at King & # 39; s College London (KCL) behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate that at least 16,310 cases of the disease have occurred daily for the past week, more than twice as many as in the past week

Scientists at King & # 39; s College London (KCL) behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate that at least 16,310 cases of the disease have occurred daily for the past week, more than twice as many as in the past week

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that it has increased by 60 percent over the same period and that there are now 9,600 infections per day

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates that it has increased by 60 percent over the same period and that there are now 9,600 infections per day

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded on Friday, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago. The MailOnline analysis shows that this is the sixth day in a row on which the average has increased compared to the previous week

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded on Friday, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago. The MailOnline analysis shows that this is the sixth day in a row on which the average has increased compared to the previous week

London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged further action to stop the increase in cases before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nationwide curfew on pubs and restaurants at 10 p.m. and encouraged people to return to work from home. Pictured: Soho

London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged further action to stop the increase in cases before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nationwide curfew on pubs and restaurants at 10 p.m. and encouraged people to return to work from home. Pictured: Soho

Leeds is also expected to be hit by new restrictions from midnight, including "more budget restrictions" on the lines of those already in place in three West Yorkshire counties, as the number of cases has risen

Leeds is also expected to be hit by new restrictions from midnight, including "more budget restrictions" on the lines of those already in place in three West Yorkshire counties, as the number of cases has risen

WHICH AREAS ARE ON THE LATEST WATCHLIST?

The last watchlist published last Friday contained:

INTERVENTION (number of infections registered by September 15 per 100,000 people living there)

BOLTON – 212.7

BLACKBURN WITH DARVES – 122.9

OADBY AND WIGSTON – 119.2

HYNDBURN – 117.6

PRESTON – 105.1

WARRINGTON – 105.0

TAMESIDE – 103.5

SUNDERLAND – 103.1

OLDHAM – 98.9

BIRMINGHAM – 98.0

BRADFORD – 97.5

LIVERPOOL – August 95

WIRRAL – 95.6

BURNLEY – 93.8

KNOWSLEY – 92.9

ST HELENS – 91.6

BURY – 90.5

SALFORD – 88.8

LEICESTER – July 86

SOUTH TYNESIDE – 86.5

ROCHDALE – 84.1

MANCHESTER – 83.6

GATESHEAD – 77.5

SOLIHULL – 77.2

SANDWELL – 72.1

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE – 69.6

PENDULUM – 61.3

HOLD – 60.7

KIRKLEES – April 60

WOLVERHAMPTON – 60.3

CALDERDALE – 59.5

ROSSENDALE – 57.8

SOUTH RIBBLE – 52.5

SEFTON – 49.0

NORTH TYNESIDE – 48.5

WEST LANCASHIRE – April 47

COUNTY DURHAM – 7/46

TRAFFIC – 45.7

CHORLEY – 1/35

WYRE – February 34

FYLDE – 28.8

NORTHUMBERLAND – 7/24

LANCASTER – 22.9

RIBBLE VALLEY – 18.3

IMPROVED SUPPORT

LEEDS – 75.5

BLABY – 65.7

STOCKPORT – 7/48

CONCERN, WORRY

SELBY – 65.1

HARTLEPOOL – 55.8

SHEFFIELD – 53.7

SPELTHORNE – 53.4

CORBY – 8/50

MIDDLESBROUGH – 47.0

NORTHAMPTON – 42.6

SCARBOROUGH – 42.3

HERTSMERE – 37.4

PETERBOROUGH – 3/30

STOKE-ON-TRENT – April 27th

A weekly report from SAGE on Friday said the R-rate appears to be between 1.2 and 1.5 for the UK and is the same in the UK. These are the highest estimates the Chief Scientists have made since their periodic updates began.

The R appears to be highest in London, the Midlands, the North West and the North East, where it is believed to be as high as in the UK. This means that each infected case passes it on to 1.2 to 1.5 others, or infects every 10 12 or 15 others.

However, SAGE warns that R's estimates are about three weeks out of date each time it is published, as they are calculated by watching the number of positive tests and hospital cases change over time.

The advisory board also says the growth rate has increased and the outbreak could now increase by four to eight percent on a daily basis. Last week it was a little lower at three to seven percent.

But it admitted that outbreaks in the southwest could increase by up to nine percent each day.

The decision to put London on the national watchlist was suggested on Friday by an eye-catching MailOnline card, suggesting that London's Covid-19 hotspots may be connected by the city's busy underground network. Bexley, Bromley, Croydon, Kingston upon Thames, and Sutton – none of which have a tube station – have the lowest infection rates in the city.

The Council Presidents met in London on Friday to confirm that the response to the capital's crisis would escalate. Stricter measures are not yet in place, but health chiefs have committed to increasing testing capacity to control flare-ups. Formal confirmation is expected to be announced later by Public Health England.

Official government figures show London recorded 620 more cases of Covid-19 yesterday – double what it was last week. However, the capital city's eruption appears to have plateaued since the surge in early September, considering separate data analyzing when positive samples were actually taken and not recorded. It can take several days for suspicious patients to get their test results back.

Hospital admissions in the capital have tripled in 14 days. The moving average increased from 11 on September 2 to 34.7 by September 19. However, the number is still a long way from the over 700 at the height of the pandemic in spring and only slightly higher than in early July (around 25). By comparison, 13 times as many approvals were registered in March (425 on March 22) – before the national lockdown was imposed.

London Councils, a bipartisan organization representing all 32 boroughs and the City of London, said the English capital would be placed on the national Covid-19 watch list.

The list is broken down into “Intervention Areas”, which are typically subject to local lockout restrictions, “Enhanced Assistance” areas that, for example, are subject to more testing, and “Problem Areas” that are closely monitored.

London councils said no additional action has been taken in the city but that "the city's testing capacity will be increased so that Londoners have timely access to Covid-19 testing and the government must ensure this is maintained from now on." ".

The organization said London's entry on the list should serve as a "strong reminder that now is the time for all Londoners to band together and take action".

The watchlist is set by Health Secretary Matt Hancock after studying the epidemiological advice provided by the Chief Medical Officer, NHS Test and Trace, the Joint Biosecurity Center and Public Health England.

Sian Berry, co-chair of the Greens and candidate for the mayor of London, said: "We haven't had test information in London in weeks, which is a major concern for all of us in local and regional government," said The Evening Standard.

& # 39; The news that Public Health England has added London to its list of problem areas using estimates from other data shows how important this is and how all of our actions can make a difference.

“The closure of bars and restaurants at 10 p.m. has already resulted in crowded scenes in public transport that worry me very much. My strong advice to Londoners is not to go out for the next few days unless you have to and find other ways to see friends and family.

"Like you, I am sad, tired and tired after six months of a major national crisis, but we are at a dangerous moment, there is a lack of data and testing, and we must work together as a city amid increasing signs of infection."

London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged further action to stop the increase in cases before Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a nationwide curfew on pubs and restaurants at 10 p.m. and encouraged people to return to work from home.

Infections across the city have more than doubled since August. The average number of cases seven days a week rose from 86 per 100,000 to 262 per 100,000.

Ministers are due to consider a decision to put even stricter restrictions on more than 9 million people in the city in case the new series of national social distancing measures the government announced this week fails to contain the rising numbers.

The most recent statistics from Public Health England (PHE), covering the week ending September 18, show that only one district in the capital – Redbridge – is among the 40 hardest hit regions in the country.

However, infection rates in 20 boroughs of London are higher than areas of England already affected by restrictions. PHE released its latest infection figures Friday afternoon, which also confirmed London's place on the watch list.

During a behind-closed-door briefing earlier this week, Kevin Fenton, director of Public Health England in London, told Mayor Khan and leaders of all 32 boroughs that all signs indicated that the disease was rapidly resurrecting in the city.

Professor Fenton argued that the testing infrastructure had been removed from the capital and redistributed to hotspots in the north, which means many Londoners may have gone undiagnosed.

He warned that cases could be massively underreported because Londoners were struggling to access tests and that increased hospital admissions and calls to 111 were better indicators that London was in the middle of such a serious outbreak like in the US Northeast.

Professor Fenton told The Times: “We are seeing a rising tide of coronavirus cases in London across a wide range of age groups. This is no longer limited to young people in their twenties. & # 39;

He said that "while the number of cases varies by neighborhood, the general trend in the city is for transmission to increase and if this continues the situation may escalate".

Professor Fenton announced that this month about a fifth of the test capacity had been removed from the capital and redistributed to hotspots in the north.

The ONS has found an increase in infections in all age groups in England - although the sharpest increase was observed in 17 to 24 year olds

The ONS has found an increase in infections in all age groups in England – although the sharpest increase was observed in 17 to 24 year olds

Data from King College London's app, where millions of Britons have signed up and reported their symptoms, suggests nearly 150,000 people are currently suffering from symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will not have symptoms

Data from King College London's app, where millions of Britons have signed up and reported their symptoms, suggests nearly 150,000 people are currently suffering from symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will not have symptoms

HOW DID THE RATE CHANGE FROM THE LAST WEEK?

AREA

United Kingdom

England

– –

east

London

Midlands

NE and Yorks

northwest

South east

southwest

THIS WEEK

1.2-1.5

1.2-1.5

1.1 – 1.3

1.2-1.5

1.2-1.5

1.2-1.5

1.2-1.5

1.0-1.3

1.1 – 1.4

LAST WEEK

1.1 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.4

1.0-1.3

1.1 – 1.4

1.2-1.5

1.2 – 1.4

1.2-1.5

1.1 – 1.4

0.9 – 1.6

HOW HAS THE GROWTH RATE CHANGED FROM THE LAST WEEK?

AREA

United Kingdom

England

– –

east

London

Midlands

NE and Yorks

northwest

South east

southwest

THIS WEEK

4% to 8%

4% to 8%

1 to 4%

4% to 9%

3% to 7%

4% to 8%

3% to 9%

1% to 5%

1% to 6%

LAST WEEK

3% to 7%

2% to 7%

0% to 5%

3% to 7%

4% to 8%

3% to 8%

3% to 8%

3% to 7%

0% to 9%

News of coronavirus cases across the country didn't deter this group from the idea of ​​going out in Leeds on Saturday

News of coronavirus cases across the country didn't deter this group from the idea of ​​going out in Leeds on Saturday

Awoman takes a picture of her companion, who was seen curled up on the floor after a night out in Leeds city center

Awoman takes a picture of her companion, who was seen curled up on the floor after a night out in Leeds city center

Around 90,000 tests were being done in London every week in mid-August, but only 65,000 tests were done last week, according to Professor Fenton.

However, the latest health ministry figures show that testing in London has increased week by week.

In the week leading up to September 16, 85,000 tests were carried out across the capital, up from 75,000 in the last seven days. Even the capital's hotspots have more access to swabs – Barking performed 2,669 tests in the week leading up to September 16, 25 percent more than the week before when 2,036 swabs were performed. In Redbridge, 3,370 residents were screened for the virus in the last reporting period, compared to 3,046 the week before, an increase of nearly 10 percent.

BETWEEN 9,000 AND 16,000 PEOPLE INFECTED EVERY DAY SHOW DATA

The northwest still bears most of the brunt of the second wave, but Yorkshire, London and the northeast are seeing significant bursts

The northwest still bears most of the brunt of the second wave, but Yorkshire, London and the northeast are seeing significant bursts

According to researchers monitoring the UK outbreak, between 9,000 and 16,000 British people become infected with coronavirus every day.

Scientists at King & # 39; s College London (KCL) behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate that at least 16,310 cases of the disease have occurred daily for the past week, more than twice as many as in the past week.

The National Statistics Bureau, a government-run agency, issued a more modest estimate on Friday. It estimates around 9,600 people contract the virus every day, a 60 percent increase from 6,000 a week earlier.

Both surveillance projects are growing far more than the government's official testing program, which recorded more than 6,000 cases on Thursday and Wednesday.

KCL gathers its data by sending tests to people reporting tell-tale symptoms of Covid-19 in the mobile app, while the ONS study is sending tests to random households regardless of their state of health.

Data from the symptom-tracking app, which millions of Britons have signed up to, suggests nearly 150,000 people currently have symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will not have symptoms. That number has more than doubled since last week when there were approximately 70,000 symptomatic patients. The chief scientist behind the app said it was fresh evidence that the crisis is "rising at an alarming rate."

The ONS, on the other hand, estimates that around 113,000 people are currently infected with the virus – this corresponds to about one in 500 people – although the figure calculation body only looks at England and Wales.

It comes when Matt Hancock suggested yesterday that the actual number of daily cases was in the region of 10,000. And the Minister of Health pointed out that in the darkest days of the crisis in March and April, when 100,000 people were infected every 24 hours, the surge is nowhere near as high as it is today.

Official figures show the outbreak may be slowing, despite hospital admissions for coronavirus tripling in 14 days and public health chiefs warning of a "rising tide" of the virus in the capital.

Only a handful of counties are currently seeing a sustained surge in infections – including Redbridge and Barking and Dagenham, two of the three hardest-hit parts of the capital.

Redbridge, in east London, has the highest number of infections in the capital as of September 18, with a weekly case rate of 34.2 per 100,000 people, according to PHE data.

The 300,000-inhabitant district currently only has the 40th highest infection rate in the UK, but has seen a sustained surge in diagnoses of Covid-19 for the past month and a half.

Figures show that infections in Redbridge have tripled since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have increased ten-fold since early August (3.3).

And Redbridge's actual number of new infections diagnosed each day – numbers provided by the Department of Health – is one of the few counties still on the rise. It went from a seven-day rolling average of three cases in late August to nearly 23 at the end of last week.

The Department of Health's data, published on the government's coronavirus dashboard, takes into account the daily cases by sample date, which means it was a few days ago as it can take up to 72 hours for a result to come back.

The west London borough of Hounslow was the second most affected area in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 in the week ending September 18. Like Redbridge, Hounslow has tripled three cases in the last three weeks of his rise, 5.9 new infections per 100,000 people in early August.

However, health department data shows cases have decreased in Hounslow, which is home to 290,000 people. Around 16 actual cases were diagnosed daily as of September 7, out of four in late August. However, on the last full day of the data, September 16, that number fell below nine.

Hounslow has one of the largest South Asian populations in the country – about 20 percent compared to the national average of 2 percent – disproportionately affected by the virus during the crisis.

Weekly infection rates in both counties are still well below the UK average, which is 47 per 100,000. Though that number is shifting up due to outbreaks like Bolton, Blackburn and Oldham.

The boroughs of Barking and Dagenham in east London suffer from 29.3 infections per 100,000, which have more than doubled since the beginning of the month when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000 and have quadrupled since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000).

Health ministry figures suggest that the average number of daily infections within seven days also continues to rise. In the community, where around 210,000 people live, an average of four cases per day were recorded at the end of August. That number rose to around nine in early September before leveling off.

However, last week's numbers, which are not yet considered accurate due to the three-day delay in analyzing the coronavirus test samples, suggest that another spike may still be hit.

Enfield (27.3), Newham (27), Ealing (26.9), Hackney (25.7), Tower Hamlets (25.5), Hammersmith and Fulham (24.8), Harrow (24.8) round the top 10 hardest hit boroughs in London from 4/24) and Havering (4/24), all of which except Newham were active the week before.

Numbers show that infections in Redbridge have tripled since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have increased ten-fold since early August (3.3)

Numbers show that infections in Redbridge have tripled since September 4, when the rate was 11.2 per 100,000 per week, and have increased ten-fold since early August (3.3)

The borough of Barking and Dagenham in east London suffers from 29.3 infections per 100,000, which have more than doubled since the beginning of the month when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000 and have quadrupled since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000).

The borough of Barking and Dagenham in east London suffers from 29.3 infections per 100,000, which have more than doubled since the start of the month when the case rate was 12.3 per 100,000 and have quadrupled since August 1 (5.9 per 100,000).

The west London borough of Hounslow was the second most affected area in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 for the week ended September 18

The west London borough of Hounslow was the second most affected area in the capital, with a weekly case rate of 32.5 per 100,000 in the week ending September 18

Is the UK's COVID-19 outbreak coming back?

Some top scientists had insisted that there was no real increase in cases because the test positivity rate - how many cases were found for each completed swab - hadn't changed much. However, this no longer appears to be the case. NHS test and trace data shows that nearly 3.3 percent of people tested get a positive result, compared to lows of 1.1 in July

Some top scientists had insisted that there was no real increase in cases because the test positivity rate – how many cases were found for each completed swab – hadn't changed much. However, this no longer appears to be the case. NHS test and trace data shows that nearly 3.3 percent of people tested get a positive result, compared to lows of 1.1 in July

According to official data, the UK coronavirus outbreak appears to be accelerating again.

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded on Friday, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago. The MailOnline analysis shows that this is the sixth day in a row on which the average has increased compared to the previous week.

Before last Saturday, the weekly growth rate of the coronavirus had been falling every day for a full week. It had fallen from 84 percent on September 12 to 20 percent on September 19.

Professor Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance, key scientific advisors to the government, terrified the nation with their dire prediction that if nothing is done, cases could hit 50,000 a day by mid-October. They claimed that infections were doubling every week, commensurate with the growing outbreaks in Spain and France.

But scientists shot down the claims, warning that they were based on ancient data based on only a few hundred positive cases. Even Boris Johnson distanced himself from the claims, saying the outbreak could double up to every 20 days.

Other numbers from NHS Test and Trace also suggest cases decreased last week. However, the latest stats – released yesterday – only go as far as September 16, which means an increase over the past week has not yet been confirmed in another government dataset.

MailOnline revealed on Friday that London's Covid-19 hotspots could be connected through the city's busy subway network, according to an eye-catching map based on government data.

The group of cases appears to be concentrated along the 11 subway lines – which were used by around 2 million people every day before the pandemic.

This means areas in the north-west and north-east of London may suffer from larger outbreaks than the south simply because they have more public transport links. Bexley, Bromley, Croydon, Kingston upon Thames, and Sutton – none of which have a tube station – have the lowest infection rates in the city.

The link has already been discovered by experts studying other contagious respiratory diseases that spread via droplets, such as the coronavirus. British scientists have previously linked busy underground stations to worse flu outbreaks.

The more changes passengers had to make on their journey, the more contact they were likely to have with other people. That could possibly be the case with London's top three hotspots – Redbridge, Hounslow, Barking and Dagenham – all of which are only served by one tube line.

Nine out of 32 districts that have had higher cases of flu because of their London Underground connections alone now also have higher rates of Covid-19 infection. Scientists say the tube is the "perfect environment" for a virus to spread, as people crowd, are poorly ventilated, and dirty surfaces are touched by millions.

However, experts say the pattern could be more complicated – it could be more key workers who are prone to picking up the virus because they come in close contact with many people and choose to live near a subway line to get around easier, while those who can work from home live further out in the suburban commuter belt.

Infection rates can also be heavily influenced by the district's disadvantage, as government studies have shown poorer areas have more Covid-19 deaths and ethnic diversity, as black, Asian, and ethnic minorities are affected by the pandemic for a large number of Establish.

Millions of travelers were kicked off the subway during the height of the first wave of coronavirus because the government ruled against any other than essential trip.

But with restrictions lifted in response to the dwindling outbreak, hundreds of thousands more trips are now being made. The pipe capacity has increased from four percent in April and May to around 35 percent. Along with the surge in travel, cases in London also seem to continue to increase.

Last week's MailOnline analysis found that a total of 20 boroughs across London had higher rates of infection than areas in England already affected by restrictions, including Kensington and Chelsea (23.7), Wandsworth (23) and Brent 22, 7th

Public Health England's most recent watchlist shows that the agency in England with the lowest case rate considered an "area of ​​intervention" – the highest level of concern – is Ribble Valley, with 18.3 cases per 100,000.

In the meantime, several districts of the capital have managed to keep the virus cases suppressed since August despite the nationwide upward trend.

The south London borough of Sutton is one of the 25 least affected areas in England with a current weekly case rate of 9.3 per 100,000 according to PHE data until September 18.

This has actually decreased compared to the previous week (10.3) and has only been 45 percent since the beginning of August (6.4). Bromley (11.8), Bexley (12.1), Merton (13.6), Croydon (14) and Kingston upon Thames (14.3) have the five lowest weekly infection rates according to Sutton.

All of these counties, with the exception of Merton, do not have a tube station, which may partly explain the low number of cases. British scientists have previously linked busy underground stations to worse flu outbreaks.

Test bosses say they needed to prioritize resources at a time when the country is struggling to increase capacity fast enough to deal with the looming second wave.

Boris Johnson has pledged that the UK can have 500,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of next month, more than double the current 242,000. However, industry insiders say that this target could be missed due to delays in machinery and chemicals.

Between 9,000 and 16,000 Britons are now infected with coronavirus every day, according to researchers monitoring the UK outbreak.

Scientists at King & # 39; s College London (KCL) behind the COVID Symptom Tracker mobile app estimate that at least 16,310 cases of the disease have occurred daily for the past week, more than twice as many as in the past week.

The National Statistics Bureau, a government-run agency, issued a more modest estimate on Friday. It estimates around 9,600 people contract the virus every day, a 60 percent increase from 6,000 a week earlier.

Both surveillance projects are growing far more than the government's official testing program, which recorded more than 6,000 cases on Thursday and Wednesday.

KCL gathers its data by sending tests to people reporting tell-tale symptoms of Covid-19 in the mobile app, while the ONS study is sending tests to random households regardless of their state of health.

Data from the symptom-tracking app, which millions of Britons have signed up to, suggests nearly 150,000 people currently have symptomatic Covid-19, although many more will not have symptoms. That number has more than doubled since last week when there were approximately 70,000 symptomatic patients. The chief scientist behind the app said it was fresh evidence that the crisis is "rising at an alarming rate."

The ONS, on the other hand, estimates that around 113,000 people are currently infected with the virus – this corresponds to about one in 500 people – although the figure calculation body only looks at England and Wales.

It comes when Matt Hancock suggested yesterday that the actual number of daily cases was in the region of 10,000. And the Minister of Health pointed out that in the darkest days of the crisis in March and April, when 100,000 people were infected every 24 hours, the surge is nowhere near as high as it is today.

KCL based its latest estimates on nearly 7,000 tests this week, of which 151 were positive – about three times more than the ONS.

More positive tests improve the accuracy of the data, but the study may have a slight bias by only swabbing people who are already sick.

The ONS study sends tests to random groups of people, which may give a better indication of the true extent of the virus. The actual number of infections is likely to be somewhere in the middle, however, and both sets of data are being fed into the government to help steer them through the crisis.

The new data from KCL was based on 6,847 swab tests carried out by people across the UK between September 7 and 20. 151 people tested positive for the virus.

Die Forscher extrapolieren diese Daten dann auf die allgemeine Bevölkerung, um Schätzungen über die Flugbahn des Virus vorzunehmen.

Die App schätzt, dass derzeit in Großbritannien 147.498 Menschen an symptomatischem Covid-19 leiden, mit 55.201 Patienten in England, 14.319 in Schottland und 9.075 in Wales. Sie haben keine Schätzungen für Nordirland gemacht.

Fast die Hälfte der neuen täglichen Infektionen tritt im Norden Englands auf (7.778), aber auch in London, Glasgow und Belfast gibt es laut KCL-Team „besorgniserregende“ Anstiege.

Aufgeschlüsselt wird der Nordwesten Englands am stärksten von der jüngsten Zunahme von Infektionen heimgesucht. Die geschätzten Fälle haben sich in den letzten sieben Tagen von 12.544 auf 36.316 verdreifacht.

Im Nordosten sowie in Yorkshire und London haben sich die Infektionen von 12.916 auf 27.731 bzw. 9.291 auf 18.200 mehr als verdoppelt.

Die Forscher sagen nun voraus, dass die Reproduktions-R-Rate – die durchschnittliche Anzahl von Menschen, die jeder Covid-19-Patient infiziert – in Großbritannien gefährlich hoch ist – 1,4 in England und Wales und 1,3 in Schottland.

Experten sagen, dass es wichtig ist, das R unter 1,0 zu halten, um zu verhindern, dass der Ausbruch exponentiell wächst und außer Kontrolle gerät.

Tim Spector, Professor für genetische Epidemiologie am King's College London und der Kopf hinter der App, sagte: 'Die Zahl der Fälle in Großbritannien steigt weiterhin alarmierend an, da sich die Zahlen im ganzen Land wöchentlich verdoppeln, insbesondere wir Sorgen um Orte wie London und andere Großstädte wie Manchester, Belfast und Glasgow, in denen die Fälle zunehmen und der R-Wert bei 1,4 liegt. & # 39;

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Downing Street (t) London