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The panoramas of the Library of Congress show the men and women who served the United States during the First World War


These centuries-old panoramas from the Library of Congress in the USA show the immense sense of duty of American soldiers, officers, nurses and hospital corps – as well as that of their mothers.

More than two million American citizens responded to their country's call for weapons during the war, and more were willing to risk their lives – 815 men signed up on the day the fighting ended.

Their commitment, their patriotism and their despair are recorded in the archive's collection, as are some rare flashes of joy.

Pictured are thousands of soldiers on horseback who remember dead comrades in the Suresnes American Cemetery on the outskirts of Paris in 1920, the officers and the crew of the United States of America. Mount Vernon, who survived a German torpedo attack, and the freshly installed war graves in the Argonne cemetery near Verdun.

Other cheering scenes show US troops returning home to their loved ones and a regiment of relieved men who signed up on the day the war ended.

Under President Woodrow Wilson, the United States remained neutral until 1917 and then went to war on the side of the Allies – the United Kingdom, France, and Russia.

Wilson sought to keep the United States out of the grueling war of wear and tear, in which thousands of people died every day in terrible conditions as they struggled to win just a few inches of devastated no man's land.

But he was ultimately unable to keep the United States out of the war, mainly because of the escalating German aggression.

On May 7, 1915, the Germans sank the British ocean liner RMS Lusitania, which had over a hundred Americans on board. Wilson warned that the United States would not allow unrestricted submarine warfare or further violations of international law.

Germany ignored the President's warning and resumed the submarine war a few months later, even trying to team up with Mexico to fight the United States. After further American deaths on ships, Wilson had no choice but to declare war on April 6, 1917.

Top Brass: Divisional Commander, 84th Division, Maj. Gen. Hale, with division staff and attached French officers at Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, November 21, 1917. The United States entered the war in April of this year after President Woodrow Wilson tried Keep them out of the conflict for two and a half years

Officers, nurses and hospital corps on June 24, 1918 at Camp MacArthur Base Hospital in Waco, Texas. Over 1.3 million U.S. citizens responded immediately to their country's call for weapons, and a million more enrolled a few months later after compulsory military service

Officers, nurses and hospital corps on June 24, 1918 at Camp MacArthur Base Hospital in Waco, Texas. Over 1.3 million U.S. citizens responded immediately to their country's call for weapons, and a million more enrolled a few months later after compulsory military service

No Mans Land in Flanders Field, France, 1919. The caption on the front of the photo reads: “Photo by W. L. King, Millersberg, Ohio; Courtesy of Military Intelligence Div., U.S. Army General Staff. & # 39;

No Mans Land in Flanders Field, France, 1919. The caption on the front of the photo reads: “Photo by W. L. King, Millersberg, Ohio; Courtesy of Military Intelligence Div., U.S. Army General Staff. & # 39;

A parade in 1918 to thank the brave soldiers who fought for peace in Europe. The weapons felt silent on November 11, 1918, killing more than 40 million people, including 50,000 Americans

A parade in 1918 to thank the brave soldiers who fought for peace in Europe. The weapons felt silent on November 11, 1918, killing more than 40 million people, including 50,000 Americans

Officers and crew in front of the US Mount Vernon on October 30, 1918. The ship carrying troops to Europe had been involved in a hectic battle with German submarines a year earlier and was lucky enough not to sink after torpedoing

Officers and crew in front of the US Mount Vernon on October 30, 1918. The ship carrying troops to Europe had been involved in a hectic battle with German submarines a year earlier and was lucky enough not to sink after torpedoing

These undoubtedly very relieved 815 men registered on November 11, 1918, the day the war was concluded. When the war ended with a victory for the Allies, more than 2 million US troops had served on the western front of Europe and more than 50,000 of them died

These undoubtedly very relieved 815 men registered on November 11, 1918, the day the war was concluded. When the war ended with a victory for the Allies, more than 2 million US troops had served on the western front of Europe and more than 50,000 of them died

U.S. flight officers at Love Field in Dallas, Texas. Aircraft technology developed rapidly in the First World War. The American inventors Elmer Sperry and Peter Hewitt developed the first pilotless drone for the US Navy in 1916

U.S. flight officers at Love Field in Dallas, Texas. Aircraft technology developed rapidly in the First World War. The American inventors Elmer Sperry and Peter Hewitt developed the first pilotless drone for the US Navy in 1916

Argonne Cemetery, Argonne Forest, France, 1919. Many of the dead here were killed in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, a major part of the last Allied offensive of the First World War that spanned the entire western front. It was fought for a total of 47 days from September 26, 1918 until the armistice on November 11, 1918. The Meuse-Argonne offensive was the largest in US military history, with 1.2 million American soldiers

Argonne Cemetery, Argonne Forest, France, 1919. Many of the dead here were killed in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, a major part of the last Allied offensive of the First World War that spanned the entire western front. It was fought for a total of 47 days from September 26, 1918 until the armistice on November 11, 1918. The Meuse-Argonne offensive was the largest in US military history, with 1.2 million American soldiers

The fourth Liberty Loan Parade, St. Helena Training Station on October 11, 1918 - exactly one month before the armistice. The 11th minute of the 11th day of the 11th month marked the end of the bloody Four Years' War, in which more than 40 million people lost their lives

The fourth Liberty Loan Parade, St. Helena Training Station on October 11, 1918 – exactly one month before the armistice. The 11th minute of the 11th day of the 11th month marked the end of the bloody Four Years' War, in which more than 40 million people lost their lives

Mounted guards pay tribute to their fallen brothers at a Memorial Day ceremony in the Suresnes American Cemetery on May 30, 1920. The cemetery is the final resting place for 1,541 American soldiers killed in World War I

Mounted guards pay tribute to their fallen brothers at a Memorial Day ceremony in the Suresnes American Cemetery on May 30, 1920. The cemetery is the final resting place for 1,541 American soldiers killed in World War I

Welcome home: Arrival in Boston on April 10, 1919 in Troopship Mongolia with boys from the 26th division ("Yankee"). It was the first US ship to sink a German submarine

Welcome home: Arrival in Boston on April 10, 1919 in Troopship Mongolia with boys of the 26th division (& # 39; Yankee & # 39;). It was the first US ship to sink a German submarine

Bring him home: Mothers of the McLennan Company, whose hearts and hopes are in France, gathered for the 4th Liberty Loan Parade on September 27, 1918

Bring him home: Mothers of the McLennan Company, whose hearts and hopes are in France, gathered for the 4th Liberty Loan Parade on September 27, 1918

Homecoming: The boys of Calumet Co. from Chilton, Wisconsin, on September 20, 1919, almost a year after the end of the war

Homecoming: The boys of Calumet Co. from Chilton, Wisconsin, on September 20, 1919, almost a year after the end of the war

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