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The NYC millionaire was insulted when the elevator was opened and stabbed in the chest by a killer in a ninja outfit


Friends said Fahim Saleh (left and right) was a homemade millionaire with a passion for gadgets and video games. He also enjoyed bringing technology companies to underdeveloped countries like Nigeria and Indonesia. In the picture (right) his motorcycle company in Nigeria

Fahim Saleh, the tech millionaire who got kicked off by a killer in a & # 39; ninja outfit & # 39; brutally murdered in his luxury Manhattan apartment was stabbed several times by his killer before he was dismembered. This resulted in an autopsy.

The 33-year-old's limbs and head were cut open by his sister when she arrived at the entrepreneur's $ 2.2 million Lower East Side apartment at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday.

Saleh was last seen alive just over 25 hours earlier. Surveillance footage from 265 East Houston showed the tech guru entering an elevator on Monday at 1:40 p.m. and an attacker – wearing a suit, tie, mask, and with a large bag – following closely behind him.

Law enforcement officials said Saleh, wearing shorts and a t-shirt, seemed suspicious when the masked man fumbled with the elevator, which required a keychain to operate.

When the doors to the seventh floor opened, words were said to have been exchanged between the two before Saleh reportedly fell to the ground when he entered his apartment.

Then there was a fight between Saleh and the attacker, but the elevator doors closed and obscured the view of the camera of what happened next.

An autopsy has since determined that his killer incensed him with a stun gun before stabbing him several times in the chest until he died, the Daily Beast reported.

When the police arrived at the complex the next day, they were greeted with a terrible scene: Saleh's torso was found in the corner of his living room, head, arms and legs separated in plastic bags.

A source from law enforcement officials told the New York Post that Saleh's limbs were "surgically cut", his arms cut off at the shoulders, and his legs just below the knees.

The killer, who described the murder as "professional," had reportedly held Saleh's blood in a corner of the room and drawn an almost "perfect outline" around his body.

Investigators also found a number of threatening items nearby, including industrial-sized plastic bags – the way contractors dispose of trash, countless cleaning products, and an electric saw that was still attached to the wall.

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Fahim Saleh is pictured with his two sisters Rif Saleh (center) and Ruby Bashir (right). It is not known which of them made the gruesome discovery

Fahim Saleh is pictured with his two sisters Rif Saleh (center) and Ruby Bashir (right). It is not known which of them made the gruesome discovery

The house where Saleh lived. His dismembered body was found by his sister at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday

The house where Saleh lived. His dismembered body was found by his sister at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday

Detectives in front of the building on Wednesday. The police have yet to find or arrest the murderer

Detectives in front of the building on Wednesday. The police have yet to find or arrest the murderer

The entrance to the expensive, exclusive building, in which there are only seven units

The entrance to the expensive, exclusive building, in which there are only seven units

All apartments in the building have their own elevator. The killer followed Saleh out of his after riding up with him, the police said. Above is a floor plan of his apartment, showing the stairs from which the killer probably escaped

All apartments in the building have their own elevator. The killer followed Saleh out of his after riding up with him, the police said. Above is a floor plan of his apartment, showing the stairs from which the killer probably escaped

Saleh's apartment is one of only seven in the exclusive Lower East Side Building. Above one of the marketing images with which the sale was advertised. It is unclear whether this is his apartment

Saleh's apartment is one of only seven in the exclusive Lower East Side Building. Above one of the marketing images with which the sale was advertised. It is unclear whether this is his apartment

Saleh was sued by a former prison guard, Kirk Eady, who was detained for using Saleh's PrankDial app to eavesdrop on employee phone calls

Saleh was sued by a former prison guard, Kirk Eady, who was detained for using Saleh's PrankDial app to eavesdrop on employee phone calls

Police believe the masked butcher may have been interrupted by Saleh's sister when she stopped by her brother's apartment on Tuesday to check on him after she hadn't seen or heard from him in more than a day.

The murderer is said to have escaped from the building through a fire escape while his victim's sibling took the elevator up, the police said.

Sources reported to the New York Post that the sister was likely to press the buzzer of Saleh's apartment before entering the building, alerting the murderer and forcing him to give up his efforts to remove the remains.

In addition to the still inserted saw, the investigators found that the blood around Saleh's upper body was not yet blackened.

The discovery suggests the 33-year-old was recently dismembered – probably in the last hour of the 25 hours that the killer appears to have spent in the apartment.

TECH ENTREPRENEUR & # 39; S PLEASE TAKE AFRICAN OFFICIALS RUNNING ITS FIGHTING COMPANY IN FEBRUARY

In February, Saleh defended his Lagok-based company Gokada after officials banned motorcycles as taxis – which paralyzed the business model and forced him to fire hundreds of people.

The company was founded to bypass the constant traffic in Nigeria, which means that people often get stuck in cars for hours.

Commuters in Lagos relied on the service to get to work, and the drivers relied on it for money.

When the ban was introduced, Saleh had to gear the business to courier and delivery services.

In a heartfelt video to Nigerian officials, he said, "It is not my country. It is a country that I believe has amazing potential and amazing people and an opportunity to shine.

“The drivers, each of them, weren't there because they just wanted to make money. They were there because they had families, children, dreams, they wanted to start businesses. They wanted to go to school.

“They already had degrees, but couldn't find a job. We were hoping that many of these drivers would not be drivers forever, we were hoping that we could place them in higher jobs in Gokada and create a nice community that was developing slowly and that really got me to the point where I was was okay to put all my money in all my effort.

& # 39; Gokada is not just a business. We do things that nobody did back then.

"It was definitely a blow."

The company confirmed his death on Wednesday in a tweet.

& # 39; Fahim was a great leader, inspiration and positive light for all of us. Our hearts go to his friends, family and all those who feel the pain and heartache that we are currently experiencing here in Gokada.

& # 39; All updates and changes will be communicated to you over time. Forever in our hearts. & # 39;

The New York Times reported that some efforts had been made to clarify the evidence.

The killer will be released on Thursday, and the police are now desperately looking for evidence of the case.

According to a nameless friend, the neighbors heard screaming and loud noises on Monday afternoon, but no one called 911.

Police experts believe the murder was financially motivated, probably the fatal outcome of an acid business.

Investigators investigate the victim's business affairs for possible motives or suspects.

"I think it was an overseas situation in which they hired a killer to do this, and maybe the person is out here on a plane," an unnamed friend of Saleh told NBC4.

Investigators say they see this theory as a possibility.

The tech tycoon's family has since asked the NYPD to find Saleh's "evil" murderer, and has described the 33-year-old's death as unimaginable.

"The headlines speak of a crime that we still cannot investigate," the family said in their statement. “No words or actions that give comfort to any of us, except the capture of the person who did nothing but evil to our loved one.

"We need and urge the NYPD and other law enforcement officials to work diligently to investigate this terrible crime and bring justice to Fahim …"

"Fahim is more than what you read. It is so much more. His brilliant and innovative mind took everyone who was part of his world on a journey and made sure no one was left behind. & # 39;

Saleh, who was born in Saudi Arabia but grew up in a Bengali family in New York, bought his luxury pad last year for $ 2.25 million and was clearly proud of his purchase – he published pictures and pictures regularly Videos on his Instagram.

His LinkedIn profile shows that the former website developer was the CEO of a motorcycle hail company in Lagos, Nigeria.

The Gokada company has recently had severe setbacks after being banned by the Nigerian government earlier this year.

It was forced to fire staff and switch from a rideshare service to a delivery courier.

The ban came at a difficult time for Gokada, which had just raised $ 5.3 million from Rise Capital, a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm, in May 2019.

After the ban was issued, the company stopped hiring money and around 800 bikers who worked for Gorkada were also fired immediately.

Saleh worked on new ideas and a new direction for the company.

At the time of his death, he was also sued by a former prison guard who became a criminal and was detained for using his PrankDial app to secretly record and listen to employees' phone calls.

He founded the app in 2015.

Using the app, Kirk Eady, the former deputy director of the Hudson County Correctional Facility, could call two employees without knowing he was behind it and then hear what they said.

He listened to their complaints about him and their work, and then took revenge on them at the workplace, according to prosecutors.

He was detained for 15 months and sued Saleh in 2017 for fraud. He claimed the app made him believe what he was doing was legal.

On June 2, Saleh tweeted menacingly: "I have a very good feeling for 2020."

A bouquet of flowers is seen outside of 265 East Houston on Thursday as a police investigation into the murder on the property continues

A bouquet of flowers is seen outside of 265 East Houston on Thursday as a police investigation into the murder on the property continues

Shortly after the police arrived at the scene to investigate, a woman was seen in the lobby of the building

Shortly after the police arrived at the scene to investigate, a woman was seen in the lobby of the building

A crowd is gathered in front of the apartment building in Manhattan's Lower East Side

A crowd is gathered in front of the apartment building in Manhattan's Lower East Side

The victim was last seen alive on Monday afternoon and was caught by surveillance cameras climbing into the elevator with the suspect

The victim was last seen alive on Monday afternoon and was caught by surveillance cameras climbing into the elevator with the suspect

Saleh bought the luxury pad last year for $ 2.25 million and was clearly proud of his purchase - he regularly posted pictures and videos on his Instagram

Saleh bought the luxury pad last year for $ 2.25 million and was clearly proud of his purchase – he regularly posted pictures and videos on his Instagram

The police believe the man was attacked as soon as he entered his apartment

The police believe the man was attacked as soon as he entered his apartment

Saleh regularly posted pictures with him and his sisters, at least one of whom lived in New York, on social media

Fahim's sister Rif is featured in this Instagram post

Saleh regularly posted pictures with him and his sisters, at least one of whom lived in New York, on social media

Gorkada had problems with its operation in Nigeria, which had been banned by the local government

Gorkada had problems with its operation in Nigeria, which had been banned by the local government

Friends of Saleh paid tribute to him and said: “He was extremely smart, ambitious and very nice. Always smile & # 39;

He never said he was afraid, ”remembered another friend. "(He was) always very happy-happy"

Friends of Saleh paid tribute to him and said: “He was extremely smart, ambitious and very nice. Always smile & # 39;

NYPD crime scene detectives are pictures taken outside the apartment block

NYPD crime scene detectives are pictures taken outside the apartment block

On Tuesday afternoon, the police were seen in the lobby of the apartment at 265 East Houston Street, speaking to a woman who had burst into tears and was probably one of Saleh's sisters who had found the body.

& # 39; She was really upset. Cry. Shivering, ”neighbor Danny Faust said to The Post. “She was just sitting there, but you can tell that her legs were shaking. She is nervous. She cried as if she had wiped her eyes. «

"She screamed when she first came down," said Faust.

& # 39; dead body? Okay. But when you hear chopped and dismembered?

& # 39; This is it. It's a sick kind of mind for someone who does that, ”he added.

Friends appeared in his building on Tuesday afternoon. A couple said they believe Saleh must have been targeted.

& # 39; He was very smart, ambitious, very kind. Always smiling, ”said a friend of the Daily News.

The friends said he was a homemade millionaire with a passion for gadgets and video games.

He also enjoyed bringing technology companies to underdeveloped countries like Nigeria and Indonesia.

He never said he was afraid, ”remembered another friend. "(He was) always very happy."

On Tuesday evening, Saleh was also recognized online.

& # 39; rest in peace, Fahim Saleh. Deepest condolences to his family and friends. The world is becoming inhumane every day, ”wrote Ashiq Rahman, a software engineer living in Toronto.

Friends said he was like the "Elon Musk of Developing Countries" because he was so determined to invest in countries to improve them.

He started his business in his parents' house in Hopewell Junction, New York.

Revealed: The tech CEO's humble beginnings, who attributed his love of computer games as a teenager to the development of a Nigeria motorcycle sharing app that raised millions of dollars from investors

Fahim Saleh was born in July 1986 to a middle-class Bengali family in Saudi Arabia. He and his parents eventually settled in Rochester, New York, with his two sisters – Rif Saleh and Ruby Bashir.

But Saleh is said to have dreamed of earning money since he was a teenager and found that his interest in computers can help make those dreams come true.

As a young teenager, his enthusiasm for the Internet, which was still in its infancy, led him to search for Google's founder and other big tech names during the dot-com boom in the late 1990s.

After playing computer games for hours, he decided to focus his computer magic on building a website.

Fahim Saleh, far left, was born to a middle-class Bengali family in Saudi Arabia. He is pictured here with his two sisters and his parents. The family eventually settled in New York State

Fahim Saleh, far left, was born to a middle-class Bengali family in Saudi Arabia. He is pictured here with his two sisters and his parents. The family eventually settled in New York State

Saleh started out small and created a website for his family when he was in eighth grade, but the dotcom boom in 1990 made him interested in website programming and development

Saleh started out small and created a website for his family when he was in eighth grade, but the dotcom boom in 1990 made him interested in website programming and development

He started small and started with a simple site for his family – Salehfamily.com. It would draw about five visitors a month, mainly driven by its proud father, who sent friends and relatives to view the pages.

But at the age of 15, Saleh started to develop a knack for programming and set up a blogging site just for his friends.

What started as a teen hangout (teenhangout.com) eventually turned into a blogging forum for the community as more people heard about the website and published articles. Eventually, around $ 3 a month began to flow in.

A blog notes that high school Saleh made a profit of between $ 100,000 and $ 150,000 a year when he created websites that focused on young people.

After graduation, he attended Bentley University in Boston, Massachusetts, where he studied computer information systems and developed a Facebook app that students could use to have groceries delivered.

He then set up a phone prank phone app that allowed a user to select a prank call before calling his friends to hear their surprised reaction.

What started generating about $ 20 a day soon grew to $ 1,000. Saleh notes in an article for Medium that PrankDial.com has generated $ 10 million in his lifetime.

The website still grosses around $ 1 million to $ 2 million a year, and has allowed Saleh to start other businesses: TapFury, an entertainment company, and Ninja Fish, which focused on gaming.

With the money that was literally generated while sleeping, he founded a venture company that allowed him to invest in startups in developing countries.

Saleh's current focus was on a Nigerian transportation service app called Gokada - essentially an Uber for motorcycles

Saleh's current focus was on a Nigerian transportation service app called Gokada – essentially an Uber for motorcycles

He is currently focusing on a Nigerian transportation service app called Gokada – essentially an Uber for motorcycles – co-founded by Saleh in 2018.

The original idea was to have people transported by motorcycle through Lagos, Nigeria's largest city.

SALEHS SHOPS

KickBack apps

KickBack Apps has four apps, including Prank Dial, which enables recorded prank calls.

Gokada

Motorbike taxi app in Lagos that commuters could use to avoid the busy traffic.

The company received a $ 5.3 million injection from Silicon Valley last year and has recently had to switch to a courier company.

Pathao

The Bangladeshi-based company started as a carpool app and now enables people to buy food and clothing.

Worth $ 100 million

Adventure capital

Venture capital firm focusing on developing countries.

Among them was Picap, Colombia's first $ 15 million rideshare app.

In its first year of operation, Gokada is said to have secured 1,000 bicycles that enable around 5,000 trips through the crowded city every day.

In February of this year, however, the company got into trouble after a ban came into force that explicitly prohibited motorcycle taxis.

The ban came suddenly and without warning after the The government of the State of Lagos said a ban was due to & # 39;Accidents and disorder caused by the vehicles. "

As a result of the ban, commuters were left stranded and many had to use packed public transport instead.

The company stopped making money and around 800 bikers who worked for Gorkada were immediately fired.

The ban came at a difficult time for Gokada, which had just raised $ 5.3 million from Rise Capital, a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm, in May 2019.

"As a company, we just have to roll the beatings and a lot of the people we had to fire were very focused on the company's transportation sector," Saleh told CNN earlier this year.

In an emotional request to Nigerian officials to reverse the February decision, Saleh said, "It is not my country. It is a country that I believe has amazing potential and amazing people and an opportunity to shine.

“The drivers, each of them, weren't there because they just wanted to make money. They were there because they had families, children, dreams, they wanted to start businesses. They wanted to go to school.

“They already had degrees, but couldn't find a job. We were hoping that many of these drivers would not be drivers forever, we were hoping that we could place them in higher jobs in Gokada and create a nice community that was developing slowly and that really got me to the point where I was was okay to put all my money in all my effort.

& # 39; Gokada is not just a business. We do things that nobody did back then.

"It was definitely a blow."

The company decided to develop into a delivery and logistics company with a new boat service that was designed to carry ships with a capacity of up to 24 people. But then the global pandemic hit and put future plans on hold.

"The drivers here in Gokada weren't there to make money, they were here because they had families, children, dreams," Saleh told Nirametrics.

“They want to start a business, they want to go to school, they already have degrees, but they couldn't find a job. For many, Gokada was not the last place in their lives. It was a stepping stone to get to this next venture. & # 39;

"I'll tell you that Gokada is not just a business, it's a mission. And every part of this mission is to always be safe and create jobs. & # 39;

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