ENTERTAINMENT

The Nottingham Christmas Market has to close after just 24 hours


An outdoor Christmas market in Nottingham will not reopen as it had to close after just 24 hours due to overcrowding – as thousands of shoppers ignored social distancing rules.

Shocking images showed hundreds of people being rammed together on the first day of the Christmas markets on Saturday in the Old Market Square in the center of the Tier-Drei-Stadt.

And now organizers have announced that the market will remain closed for the remainder of the year after locals outraged the lack of social distancing. You said earlier the closure was temporary.

The Mellors Group events firm, which runs the Christmas market, said it was "sorry it didn't work out."

In a joint statement with Nottingham City Council, the Mellors Group said: “There were plans to control access to manage the number of people entering the site at the same time and to monitor this continuously throughout Saturday.

"However, the numbers were too big to be implemented effectively."

The city center was said to have seen significant visitor numbers on the first Saturday since the second national lockdown in England was lifted and was "significantly busier than expected".

It continued, “After seeing yesterday (Saturday) how busy the city center was overall, we decided not to reopen the market at all this year.

"We know this will be very disappointing to many locals looking forward to visit and to the stallholders, many of whom were locals, for whom this was an important opportunity to do business in an incredibly difficult year. "

Huge crowds can be seen at the Christmas market in Nottingham on Saturday. The market has now been temporarily closed after large crowds gathered at the attraction

The British flocked to the main streets to do Christmas shopping on Sunday after stores reopened after the nationwide lockdown was lifted. Oxford Street is pictured in London

The British flocked to the main streets to do Christmas shopping on Sunday after stores reopened after the nationwide lockdown was lifted. Oxford Street is pictured in London

Many have also wrapped up warm to close Debenhams (pictured) and Nike stores on Oxford Street in central London

Many have also wrapped up warm to close Debenhams (pictured) and Nike stores on Oxford Street in central London

However, in Nottingham, which is under Tier 3 restrictions, the crowd was too large. Pictures showed thousands of people huddled together in Old Market Square (pictured) on the first day of opening on Saturday

However, in Nottingham, which is under Tier 3 restrictions, the crowd was too large. Pictures showed thousands of people huddled together in Old Market Square (pictured) on the first day of opening on Saturday

It added: “The views that are being expressed both for and against are very important to us and we have listened carefully.

& # 39; The decision to go ahead with the market was not taken lightly, nor was the decision made to close.

"We're sorry it didn't work out."

Nottinghamshire Police said officers were in the market all day to ensure a visible presence and to break up large crowds.

The Meadows, Nottingham, 24-year-old game designer Luke Brown said there were at least a few hundred people in the market, which he called "insane".

He said, “I was on the edge of the market because there were so many people inside, many people weren't wearing masks at all, and it was definitely not two meters away.

"I was very uncomfortable being there so after five minutes we literally went home."

The city has been placed in Tier 3 – toughest measures – of the new Covid-19 restrictions that went into effect in England from Wednesday after the four-week national lockdown ended.

Nottinghamshire Police said officers were in the market all day to ensure a visible presence and to break up large crowds in the area. The market should be open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day until Christmas Eve.

The original decision to enter the market came when similar events were canceled in other cities, including Birmingham and Manchester.

It's the second day off since the lockdown ended on December 2nd, which shoppers have been in effect in hopes of doing Christmas sales.

Shoppers in Kington, Herefordshire were shown holding bags of goods and waiting in line at Marks and Spencer. Many have also wrapped up warm in anticipation of the Debenhams and Nike stores on Oxford Street in central London closing soon.

The Nottingham Christmas Market, which was temporarily closed after large crowds gathered at the attraction on Saturday. Today it's empty (picture)

The Nottingham Christmas Market, which was temporarily closed after large crowds gathered at the attraction on Saturday. Today it's empty (picture)

Shoppers in downtown Nottingham on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions eased

Shoppers in downtown Nottingham on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions eased

In addition to the closure of the Nottingham Christmas markets, the city center was very busy with shoppers

In addition to the closure of the Nottingham Christmas markets, the city center was very busy with shoppers

Mellors Group, which is running the event in partnership with Nottingham City Council, said: "Given the unprecedented number of retail visitors both domestically and internationally, we have decided to temporarily close the Christmas market today."

Mellors Group, which is running the event in partnership with Nottingham City Council, said: "Given the unprecedented number of retail visitors both domestically and internationally, we have decided to temporarily close the Christmas market today."

It's not clear when the Nottingham Christmas Market (which was very busy yesterday) will reopen, but it was the first weekend it opened

It's not clear when the Nottingham Christmas Market (which was very busy yesterday) will reopen, but it was the first weekend it opened

On the second day off since the lockdown ended on December 2, shoppers had gone into effect in hopes of doing Christmas sales with prices up to 80 percent lower. Oxford Street is pictured in London

On the second day off since the lockdown ended on December 2, shoppers had gone into effect in hopes of doing Christmas sales with prices up to 80 percent lower. Oxford Street is pictured in London

On the second day of a likely £ 1.5 billion holiday spree, shoppers in Kington, Herefordshire were pictured with shopping bags and queues in front of Marks and Spencer

On the second day of a likely £ 1.5 billion holiday spree, shoppers in Kington, Herefordshire were pictured with shopping bags and queues in front of Marks and Spencer

Shoppers riding electric scooters on Oxford Street in London for the first weekend after the end of the second national suspension in England

Shoppers riding electric scooters on Oxford Street in London for the first weekend after the end of the second national suspension in England

The Meadows, Nottingham, 24-year-old game designer Luke Brown said there were at least a few hundred people in the market, which he called "insane".

He said, “I was on the edge of the market because there were so many people inside, many people weren't wearing masks at all, and it was definitely not two meters away.

"I was very uncomfortable being there so after five minutes we literally went home."

Hundreds of young people tried to enter Harrods last night, creating chaos by gathering outside the London shop and making four arrests after police rushed in.

On Main Street, retailers are hoping today's shopping will bring life to a sector that has been hit by the shutdown caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The lifeline for struggling stores is on Main Street after a week of trouble as 26,500 retailer jobs were at risk, including Sir Philip Green and Debenhams' Arcadia Group, which have been hard hit by the pandemic.

Two out of three smaller companies and the self-employed had to stop trading at some point in the past six months, as new studies show.

In less than three weeks leading up to Christmas, shoppers will be urged to shop locally to save small businesses from financial ruin.

Despite a festive turmoil on the first Saturday since the second national lockdown was lifted, retail industry figures show that around a third fewer people frequented main English streets than at that time last year.

Data from retail analyst ShopperTrak shows that visitor numbers are down 29 percent year-on-year as many were cautionary wrong even though non-essential stores are allowed to reopen on Wednesday.

On a cold Sunday afternoon in London, shoppers walk down Oxford Street past queues for shops. There were similar scenes in the capital yesterday

On a cold Sunday afternoon in London, shoppers walk down Oxford Street past queues for shops. There were similar scenes in the capital yesterday

Shoppers on Oxford Street in London on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions being relaxed

Shoppers on Oxford Street in London on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions being relaxed

In less than three weeks leading up to Christmas, shoppers will be urged to shop locally to save small businesses from financial ruin. Oxford Street is pictured in London

In less than three weeks leading up to Christmas, shoppers will be urged to shop locally to save small businesses from financial ruin. Oxford Street is pictured in London

Andy Sumpter, retail advisor for the consumer analytics firm, said retailers are hoping the pent-up demand will continue until the last Saturday before Christmas – known as Super Saturday – on December 19, when stores are hoping for a decent success by Christmas.

While customer traffic increased by 193 percent nationwide from week to week on Saturday, Sumpter said, "Many are still feeling the effects of the lockdown."

"Building confidence in physical shopping trips and keeping consumers safe in stores will be the cornerstone of ensuring shoppers return time and again to support not only stores but their local communities that rely on the high street ", he said.

There was a decline in numbers towards London's West End, home to one of the world's most popular shopping destinations.

The New West End Company, which represents 600 companies in London's shopping district, saw visitor numbers drop by 37 percent year over year.

A spokesman said: "Safety is our top priority. Since the lockdown was lifted, we've regularly updated safeguards like hygiene hubs and clear road markings to encourage social distancing."

Buyer numbers fell last month with the reintroduction of stricter coronavirus restrictions. Data from the British Retail Consortium and ShopperTrak showed that visitor numbers across the UK in November were down 65.4 percent from the same month last year.

Simply Business insurers estimated that two out of three smaller businesses and self-employed people had to stop trading at some point in the past six months due to the crisis.

It found that Covid-19 could cost small businesses up to £ 69 billion, while a separate study by American Express found that almost half of non-essential independent retailers believed their survival depended on pre-Christmas sales.

When the British hit stores, data from travel agent TomTom showed that congestion rates in all of England's major cities were higher than last week at this time.

The shopping scenes come after thousands of drinkers broke into bars in Soho, London last night.

Shoppers queue outside the Nike Town London store on Oxford Street before it opens this morning

Shoppers queue outside the Nike Town London store on Oxford Street before it opens this morning

Buyers line up outside Debenhams on Oxford Street in London today. Shoppers returned to the main streets of England this week as stores reopened after a four-week coronavirus lockdown ended

Buyers line up outside Debenhams on Oxford Street in London today. Shoppers returned to the main streets of England this week as stores reopened after a four-week coronavirus lockdown ended

Shoppers on Oxford Street in London on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions being relaxed

Shoppers on Oxford Street in London on the first weekend after the end of England's second national lockdown, with coronavirus restrictions being relaxed

When the British hit stores, data from travel agent TomTom showed that congestion rates in all of England's major cities were higher than last week at this time. Oxford Street is pictured in London

When the British hit stores, data from travel agent TomTom showed that congestion rates in all of England's major cities were higher than last week at this time. Oxford Street is pictured in London

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) London (t) Christmas