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The North East of England is facing tougher crackdown on the mixing of households


More stringent restrictions are being put in place across much of the north-east of England prohibiting people from mixing between households in any setting, the Health Secretary said.

In the House of Commons, Matt Hancock said existing measures – for Northumberland, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham – would be tightened at the request of local authorities as the virus was still spreading.

It had been illegal for two households to mingle in the yard or garden, but it was only guidance that they should not meet in public places, including restaurants and pubs.

From Wednesday People are not allowed to mix with others outside of their household or to bubble indoors, including pubs and restaurants. The restriction is legally enforceable and can come with a fine.

Mr Hancock said: “Today I have to announce further action for those parts of the Northeast where we started local action two weeks ago. Unfortunately, the number of cases continues to rise sharply.

& # 39; The incident rate across the region is now over 100 cases per 100,000. We know that a large number of these infections occur indoors, outside the home.

“At the request of the local councils, with whom we have worked closely, we will therefore introduce legal restrictions on mixing households indoors in any environment.

“We're not taking these steps lightly, but we need to take them now because we know that quick action is more likely to get the virus under control and the faster we can get this virus under control, the faster we can restore the freedoms that we have all enjoy in the northeast and across the country. & # 39;

The latest rule changes are taking place in pubs and bars amid growing anger over the "idiotic" 10 p.m. curfew, where many drinkers have been pushed onto the streets at the same time to continue partying.

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, told Radio 4 & # 39; s Today that a 9 p.m. curfew on alcohol sales in stores could lessen the damage by preventing bar-goers from rushing for licenses at 10 p.m., to get more alcohol.

In other twists and turns of today's coronavirus crisis:

  • Boris Johnson faces a growing Tory rebellion over action and evasion of parliamentary scrutiny – although spokesman Lindsay Hoyle is expected to save him from a humiliating Commons defeat to coronavirus powers by refusing to speak about an amendment this week Vote rebels.
  • No10 has tried to cool the argument over students being forced to self-isolate and insisted that they "expect" to be allowed to return home for Christmas.
  • Matt Hancock has ignored requests from former Minister Simon Clarke and other Teesside MPs to announce restrictions on the mixing of households in the northeast.
  • Tory MP Steve Baker compared Mr. Johnson to Lord of the Rings character Theoden, who was put into a trance by evil advisors who wreaked havoc on the kingdom.
  • Downing Street has insisted that it is too early to assess whether the rule of six is ​​working, despite a two-week timeframe for evaluation when it was introduced on Sept. 14.
  • Chris Hopson, head of the NHS operator, warned the government must run a million tests a day until winter and that the contact tracing system is now as important as catching criminals or putting out fires.

Much of the north-east of England is about to put stricter restrictions prohibiting people from mixing between households in any setting, the Health Secretary said

In the House of Commons, Matt Hancock said existing measures - for Northumberland, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham - would be tightened at the request of local authorities as the virus was still spreading

In the House of Commons, Matt Hancock said existing measures – for Northumberland, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham – would be tightened at the request of local authorities as the virus was still spreading

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, told Radio 4 & # 39; s Today that a 9 p.m. curfew on alcohol sales in stores could lessen the damage by preventing bar-goers from rushing for licenses at 10 p.m., to get more alcohol

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, told Radio 4 & # 39; s Today that a 9 p.m. curfew on alcohol sales in stores could lessen the damage by preventing bar-goers from rushing for licenses at 10 p.m., to get more alcohol

It had been illegal for two households to mingle in the yard or garden, but it was only guidance that they should not meet in public places, including restaurants and pubs. Pictured: a group of girls take to the streets of Newcastle

It had been illegal for two households to mingle in the yard or garden, but it was only guidance that they should not meet in public places, including restaurants and pubs. Pictured: a group of girls take to the streets of Newcastle

New laws and fines for the whole country

  • Fines for those who refuse to self-isolate start at £ 1,000 and rise to £ 10,000 for repeat offenders.
  • However, if you find that you have left self-isolation “recklessly” the fine starts at £ 4,000
  • It recklessly describes how one deliberately goes to a crowded place where one could infect others – like in an office.
  • A £ 1,000 fine if you maliciously claim someone may have been exposed to the coronavirus and the lie will then be discovered.
  • Pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes cannot play more than 85 decibels of music – about as loud as in a busy restaurant or in heavy traffic. L.Live performances are exempt from this rule.
  • Landlords and managers must take "all reasonable steps" to prevent customers from singing and dancing by anyone in groups of six or more in their premises. Weddings are exempt from this rule.
  • Fines of £ 4,000 for “reckless” people who come into contact with other people knowing they should be isolated in the home.
  • Examples of this are people who work in an office or other crowded place when they should be at home.
  • £ 50 fine for employees who fail to tell their workplace to self-isolate.
  • Employers are prohibited from forcing employees to work when they should self-isolate or follow an employee's desire to work instead of self-isolating

Mr Burnham told the program that he had received reports that "supermarkets were packed to the rafters" as people gathered after 10pm.

“I think there is an urgent need to review emerging evidence from police forces across the country.

“My gut feeling is that this curfew does more harm than good and brings me back to my central point.

“Perhaps there could be a 9pm curfew on alcohol sales in supermarkets and stores that would prevent the rush to shops once the pubs close. We saw that on Saturday. & # 39;

It is because pubs, restaurants, bars and cafes are now banned from playing loud music according to the draconian rules that ministers sneaked out overnight in increasing anger over the “idiotic” curfew on number 10 at 10pm.

New laws mean that no music above 85 decibels may be played on premises in England – similar to what happens in a busy restaurant or in heavy traffic. However, live performances are exempt from the rules.

And the strict Covid-19 rules that were tacitly introduced today mean that managers mTake all reasonable steps to discourage customers from dancing and groups of six or more. But the ministers have spared wedding ceremonies and receptions by law.

The new laws were introduced along with a new £ 4,000 fine for those who "recklessly" break self-isolation and a £ 1,000 fine for maliciously isolating people by falsely telling authorities that they might have come into contact with the virus.

They came, as government statistics showed A tiny fraction of the Covid-19 outbreaks have been linked to pubs and restaurants. Only 17 out of 532 (3.2 percent) of the coronavirus clusters reported in England occurred in the hospitality industry last week – up from around 5 percent in the week before the draconian restriction was introduced.

Meanwhile, the proportion of schools has doubled to more than 40 percent after thousands more students returned to classrooms and universities, which likely had a massive impact on nursing homes, where the rate has dropped from 44 percent to 25 percent.

The results will likely be used to demand answers from ministers as to why they chose to target pubs and restaurants with economically crippling measures to contain the spread of the coronavirus, although official data suggests it is hardly to blame and that most cases this can be traced back to schools and offices.

Downing Street today dismissed a spate of convictions of the 10pm curfew, despite Tory MPs calling it a "sick experiment" and the mayor of one of the UK's largest cities warning that they are doing "more harm than good".

The prime minister faces growing anger over his management of the crisis after Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the government drinking period has only moved the party indoors.

In trendy Moseley, Birmingham, numerous drinkers were spotted on Saturday night turning to marching bands despite restrictions that demanded social distancing. Similar extraordinary scenes were seen in London and Manchester when restrictions appeared to backfire spectacularly.

But the Prime Minister's spokesman defiantly said this afternoon and insisted that there is no intention of changing the rules again – even denying that they have caused serious problems.

Meanwhile, Mr Johnson is scrambling to contain a Tory insurgency as he renews the government's extensive powers to enforce coronavirus curbs without parliamentary scrutiny. MPs also responded with outrage at signs that ministers might soon tighten measures further by banning indoor mixing – something Nicola Sturgeon has already done in Scotland.

The UK today recorded 4,044 more cases of coronavirus – meaning the daily average number of new infections has fallen for the first time in a fortnight. But they're still nowhere near as high as they were in the darkest days of the UK's Covid-19 crisis in March and April, when top scientists estimate that more than 100,000 cases have actually occurred every day.

Health chiefs also recorded 13 more coronavirus deaths today, bringing the total number of laboratory-confirmed victims to 42,000 within 28 days of being diagnosed. Only the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico, all countries with much larger populations, have suffered more deaths.

How the proportion of outbreaks in different environments changed from the week leading up to August 9th. Silver = educational institutions, nursing homes = dark blue, workplaces = pink, restaurants = green, hospitals = brown, prisons = yellow, and other settings = orange

How the proportion of outbreaks in different environments has changed since the week leading up to August 9th. Silver = educational institutions, nursing homes = dark blue, workplaces = pink, restaurants = green, hospitals = brown, prisons = yellow, and other settings = orange

Only 22 of 532 outbreaks of acute respiratory infections were reported in grocery stores in England between September 14 and 20. Of these, 17 were due to Covid-19, while the others may have been flu or other viral diseases

Only 22 of 532 outbreaks of acute respiratory infections were reported in grocery stores in England between September 14 and 20. Of these, 17 were due to Covid-19, while the others may have been flu or other viral diseases

Separate data released by Public Health England showed that eating out, shopping and vacationing were the most common activities reported by people who tested positive for Covid-19 before developing any symptoms

Separate data released by Public Health England showed that eating out, shopping and vacationing were the most common activities reported by people who tested positive for Covid-19 before developing any symptoms

The country's struggling hospitality sector saw just 22 outbreaks of respiratory infections - including Covid-19, a 12 decrease from September 14-20 (Image: Pubgoers in London's Borough Market last week).

The country's struggling hospitality sector saw just 22 outbreaks of respiratory infections – including Covid-19, a 12 decrease from September 14-20 (Image: Pubgoers in London's Borough Market last week).

Respiratory diseases are all conditions that affect the respiratory system, including the coronavirus. An increase in rhinovirus infections in recent weeks causing runny nose could explain the increasing number of outbreaks in schools

Respiratory diseases are all conditions that affect the respiratory system, including the coronavirus. An increase in rhinovirus infections in recent weeks causing runny nose could explain the increasing number of outbreaks in schools

NUMBER 10 & # 39; S 10PM CURFEW IS USED BY TORY MPS as & # 39; SICK EXPERIMENT & # 39; designated

Boris Johnson's 10 p.m. coronavirus curfew was classified by his own MPs as a "sick experiment for a second wave" – ​​when the mayor of one of the UK's largest cities warned that it would "do more harm than good".

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said the government drinking period is pushing crowds into supermarkets to buy alcohol to drink by the roadside or in private homes.

It came when dozens of drinkers were spotted on Saturday night in trendy Moseley, Birmingham, turning to a marching band despite restrictions imposing social distancing.

The prime minister's curfew, which he announced last week, has largely been postponed due to these foreseeable consequences.

A Tory MP wrote to Politico, “What clown-faced idiot thought it would be a good idea to throw thousands of p ***** people out of pubs onto the street and into the subway at the same time?

"It's like some kind of sick experiment to see if you can incubate a second wave."

Public Health England statistics provide an overview of where coronavirus and other pathogens are spreading across the country.

PHE reports on situations where local health teams have received reports that two or more people have been diagnosed with the same respiratory infection. Outbreaks can vary in size and no data is published on how many people are involved in each. Not every outbreak has been recorded when health bosses cannot link cases to a setting.

The outbreaks in restaurants and grocery stores lagged well behind schools and colleges, which accounted for 41.7 percent of the outbreaks recorded in England – a total of 222. Nursing homes recorded 25.2 percent (134), followed by offices and factories at 19 , 2 percent (134). 102) and hospitals with 5.8 percent (31).

Of all 772 respiratory disease outbreaks recorded across the country in the week ending September 20, 532 had at least one case that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 – the coronavirus that causes Covid-19.

The numbers stem from growing concerns that pubs and restaurants closing at 10 p.m. could lead to a surge in infections. Over the weekend, drunk travelers were pushed onto public transport when they got off – they would likely have been more thinly distributed over longer periods of time had there been no curfew.

In Piccadilly Circus, Leeds, Liverpool and Manchester in London, drinkers were celebrated in the streets after being evicted from venues that pulled down the shutters.

Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham has warned that the draconian restriction "does more harm than good" for the government, forcing crowds into supermarkets to buy alcohol to drink on the side of the road or in their homes. Tory MPs today called the curfew a "sick experiment".

And landlords have also warned the measures could mean a “death sentence” on barely “on the water” companies after losing months of trade during the UK's blanket lockdown.

Public Health England does not explain which attitudes qualify as "other" but it only accounted for 4.1 percent of all Covid-19 outbreaks (22) in the last full week of data.

The President of the Council calls for the immediate lockdown of Covid in London

A Labor Council chairman today called for an immediate lockdown in London, which would include a ban on visiting friends and families.

Jas Athwal, chairman of Redbridge Borough Council, made the request after it was revealed that his district and four others in east London had seen a surge in cases last week, causing the capital to turn to the Covid- Government watch list has been set.

It comes just two days after London Mayor Sadiq Khan asked the Prime Minister to ban home visits for nine million people in London as part of lockdown measures to combat the rise in Covid-19 infections.

London was placed on the national lockdown watch list last week due to a surge in coronavirus cases and hospital admissions. Government advisors warned the capital's R-rate could now be 1.5.

Acute outbreaks of respiratory infections – when two or more people have the same coughing fit – were eight times more common in the second week of September than in the first in England's schools (23-193).

Not all outbreaks will be Covid-19 – they are chest infections in general – but it is confirmed that at least two-thirds are caused by coronavirus.

The high levels of outbreaks in schools may be due to a resurgence of the rhinovirus, which causes runny noses, according to data from Public Health England.

The graph shows a significant increase in this virus as children mingle in schools after months at home.

The dates are likely to put more pressure on the government to end the "dangerous" curfew at 10pm and "encourage people to gather on the streets".

Professor Robert Dingwall, a sociologist who also advises the government, said this was another example of patrician policymaking.

“When was the last time any of those involved in this decision was in a pub in the city center? The contempt for the night pub reflects the puritan phase of public health that has marked so many interventions, ”he said.

"Anyone with a basic understanding of sociology, anthropology, social law studies, or criminology would have predicted the traffic chaos described by Andy Burnham – and the street festivals we've seen elsewhere."

John Apter, national police federation chairman, said police are having difficulty dispersing large crowds that were gathering with limited numbers of officers available.

The spokesman wants to save the PM by rejecting the Tory rebels' offer to change

Spokesman Lindsay Hoyle will save Boris Johnson's blush by refusing to call for a rebel Tory change on coronavirus curbs this week – despite more MPs joining the revolt.

The Prime Minister is fighting to quell the growing anger of his own MPs over the restrictions and lack of parliamentary scrutiny.

It is alleged that up to 100 will be willing to stand behind an amendment from conservative backbench chief Sir Graham Brady that would force ministers to get approval in advance before further restrictions are put in place.

Despite the huge support, spokeswoman Lindsay Hoyle is not expected to vote on the change.

The government has filed a motion to renew its extensive powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020 – which otherwise becomes obsolete.

The rebels took the opportunity to add wording that would make further restrictions subject to a vote by MPs.

However, the adoption of the amendment would be inconsistent with the standard parliamentary procedure for this type of motion, namely to get a "clean" yes or no decision from the House.

Sir Lindsay was concerned not to get involved in the rule-breaking arguments that tainted John Bercows last few days in the chair, as he was seen as a party to Remainer.

A senior MP told MailOnline that Sir Graham was marching with his troops to the top of the hill but had to march them back down.

“It's a little 'Grand Old Duke of York,” they said. “If you (let the vote) go back to what the previous speaker did and you will be decided by the courts in the end.

"If you don't believe in it, you can vote against it – a simple vote."

"Maybe you only have one or two people on a busy main street at 10 p.m. when hundreds and hundreds of people take to the streets," he said today.

“My colleagues will do their best to encourage and force people to keep going, but it's really difficult.

"All you need is a hostile group to turn against these officials, and resources for this city center have been swallowed up to deal with this one incident."

Former Labor leadership contender, Mr Burnham, said: “I received reports that supermarkets were full to the rafters and crowds of people gathered after 10pm.

“I think there is an urgent need to review emerging evidence from police forces across the country. My gut feeling is that this curfew does more harm than good. & # 39;

His words were repeated by Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson. The city has had its average number of daily cases nearly tripled in two weeks, putting it on the government's lockdown watchlist.

Taking the government's blanket approach, he said, "No off-licenses and supermarkets are allowed to be open to sell beer until midnight, and pubs can empty at 10 p.m. when people go off-licenses, beer buy or drink on the street in large groups or go into houses and drink in large groups. It will only spread the virus.

“The current situation makes things more dangerous, not better.

"I think it's silly to close restaurants at 10pm," he said, adding that midnight is "more responsible" and that pub closings should be staggered.

An angry Conservative MP also expressed concern about the measures, telling Politico, “What clown-faced idiot thought it was a good idea to throw thousands of people out of pubs onto the street and onto the subway at the same time?

"It's like some kind of sick experiment to see if you can incubate a second wave."

Meanwhile, spokesman Lindsay Hoyle will save Boris Johnson's blush by refusing to name a rebel Tory amendment on coronavirus curbs this week – despite more MPs joining the revolt.

The Prime Minister is fighting to quell the growing anger of his own MPs over the restrictions and lack of parliamentary scrutiny.

It is alleged that up to 100 will be willing to stand behind an amendment from conservative backbench chief Sir Graham Brady that would force ministers to get approval in advance before further restrictions are put in place.

Despite the huge support, spokeswoman Lindsay Hoyle is not expected to vote on the change.

The government has filed a motion to renew its extensive powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020 – which otherwise becomes obsolete.

Rebels took the opportunity to add wording that would subject further restrictions to a vote by MPs.

However, the adoption of the amendment would be inconsistent with the standard parliamentary procedure for this type of motion, namely to get a "clean" yes or no decision from the House.

Sir Lindsay was concerned not to get involved in the infraction disputes that spotted John Bercows last few days in the chair, as he was viewed as a party to Remainers.

A senior MP told MailOnline that Sir Graham was marching with his troops to the top of the hill but had to march them back down.

“It's a little 'Grand Old Duke of York,” they said. “If you (let the vote) go back to what the previous speaker did and you will be decided by the courts in the end.

"If you don't believe in it, you can vote against it – a simple vote."

Pictures showed thousands of night owls crowding England's streets and public transport this weekend after the 10 p.m. curfew came.

Data from NHS Test and Trace shows that between September 21-27, the most common place of transmission was reported as being at home or visiting another household.

The data also showed that coronavirus sufferers were most likely to say they would eat out or shop before symptoms appeared, followed by a vacation, or alone or with family.

Scientists are spread out over the 10pm deadline, which "does not appear to be based on evidence" but suggests that a compromise has been struck between economic damage and a desire to contain the spread of viruses.

Drinkers on the street in London after being kicked out of pubs due to curfew

Drinkers on the street in London after being kicked out of pubs due to curfew

Are CURFEWS slowing the spread of COVID-19?

When Thailand imposed a curfew from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. on April 3, it counted just over 100 cases of coronavirus a day. By the time the curfew was lifted on June 15, that number had fallen to the low tens.

Although the country's success can be attributed to the curfew, some scholars deny it on the grounds that the lockdown and other social measures in place at the time had a greater impact.

Britain hopes its curfew can help reflect the success of the Southeast Asian nation.

Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, said HuffPost curfews are used because "we know night economy is generally risky".

"There have been outbreaks related to nightclubs, bars and restaurants," she said. "We've known that for months."

"The longer people are in these places, the more likely they are to leave their vigilance behind and the mix of social distancing and alcohol is not a good one despite the best efforts of customs officers and venue owners."

Behavioral expert Professor Susan Michie, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE), said the time at 10 p.m. was chosen to balance the needs of the night economy with the need for virus control.

Professor Mark Woolhouse, a member of the Pandemic Influenza Scientific Group on Modeling (SPI-M), said there was no scientific basis for the deadline.

Speaking on the Andrew Marr Show, he admitted that he was not aware of any modeling to assess its impact, but said it did not offer the kind of granularity needed to study its potential impact.

"So these kinds of things have to be judgment decisions based on public health rather than modeling," he said.

“There is no proven scientific basis for this. Since this is a new challenge, we need to use interventions that we have never tried before. All of these were ad hoc interventions that we learn over time. & # 39;

Professor Sunetra Gupta, a leading theoretical epidemiologist at Oxford University, has urged ministers to take an "age-stratified" approach to tackling the pandemic, using targeted measures to protect the vulnerable and the elderly.

She told Sky News yesterday, "I think an efficient system would be to protect the vulnerable and find a way that people in nursing homes cannot be affected."

The professor was among 30 scientists who urged the government to consider a more focused approach to controlling the outbreak, rather than blanket restrictions.

In a letter to the British Medical Journal, they argued that interventions should be focused on these groups as 89 percent of Covid-19 deaths occurred in those over 65 and also focused on people with pre-existing medical conditions.

"This wide variation in risk by age and state of health suggests that the harm caused by consistent guidelines (which apply to everyone) outweighs the benefits," they say.

Industry associations have warned the curfew will lead to illegal raves and house parties as drinkers are forced out of licensed venues.

The UK hospitality group summed this up as "another major blow" to the sector, while the pubs campaign called for further financial support.

Greg Mulholland, the group's campaign manager, said, "The way it is, most pubs have only just gotten back on their feet and many have not yet traded profitably and this latest news will make it impossible for some customs officers to continue."

Now you can be fined £ 4,000 for "ruthlessly" exiting self-isolation and £ 1,000 for making a fake Covid claim under the new coronavirus rules that are silently introduced overnight with no prior warning to the public

The police are allowed to fine those who "ruthlessly" breach their self-isolation at £ 4,000 if ministers enact new rules overnight.

Pubs and other venues in England are also prohibited from playing loud music or allowing singing or dancing.

People who refuse to self-isolate can be fined up to £ 10,000 for consistently refusing to stay at home under the new new powers put in place by ministers.

Boris Johnson's administration has also fined £ 1,000 for those who maliciously force people into isolation by falsely telling authorities they may have been exposed to the virus.

This means that people who darkly take revenge on an ex-partner or terrible boss will be forced to stay home if they are discovered.

There are also fines for people who try to work in isolation when they should be isolated and who fail to inform their employer of their situation.

But the laws also state that you can break self-isolation for reasons that are acceptable, including handing a pet over to the vet.

The manner in which these fines were introduced without a vote sparked a violent backlash among Tory backers who were already unhappy with the way ministers freelance new laws without parliamentary scrutiny.

Former Tory Minister Steve Baker compared some of the government's coronavirus restrictions to George Orwell's dystopian novel from 1984, specifically referring to a ban on singing and dancing in bars, cafes and restaurants.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock told the Commons this afternoon that he had agreed to hold another meeting with a Tory MP leading a rebellion over Parliament's ability to review government-imposed coronavirus restrictions.

Mr Hancock told the Commons he would meet Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the influential Tory Backbench Committee in 1922, and other Tories to discuss the matter further.

Mr Hancock told MPs: “I applaud the scrutiny this House is taking. I have answered seven urgent questions, made 12 statements and taken 800 actions since this pandemic began, and I am determined to continue the commitment. & # 39;

But former Whip Chief Mark Harper interrupted him and said, “But it's not just about control, it's about the laws we make, and those that are, for example, tonight at midnight with 12 pages of detailed laws, lots of details and offenses and duties not mentioned when set out in a statement last week, including duties to employers, directors and officers with severe criminal penalties.

Boris Johnson (pictured today) has introduced £ 1,000 for those who maliciously force other people into isolation by making false claims to authorities that they may have come into contact with the virus

Boris Johnson (pictured today) has introduced £ 1,000 for those who maliciously force other people into isolation by making false claims to authorities that they may have come into contact with the virus

The far-reaching laws and the list of punishments were revealed in legal documents and went into effect on Monday.

The far-reaching laws and the list of punishments were revealed in legal documents and went into effect on Monday.

Acceptable excuses for breaking self-isolation

The legislation released today lists acceptable reasons for violating your own self-isolation.

Not only are there five-digit sums for fraudulent violations, but there are also a number of acceptable excuses.

Medical care is perhaps an obvious reason. The rules state that this can be either "urgently needed" or as a referral from a GP for less emergency treatment.

The spectrum of physical medical care includes dentistry, opticians, audiologists, podiatrists, chiropractors and osteopaths. Mental treatment is also on the list.

Pet owners are also allowed to take their pets or work animals with them for treatment "if this is urgently necessary or on the advice of a veterinarian".

Legal obligations are also permitted, such as attending a court or other legal proceeding or answering a bail.

Another reason is to avoid the risk of damage. For example, if your house is on fire, fleeing terror is not breaking the rules.

You can also attend a “close family member” funeral and provide “basic necessities” such as food and medicine for people in your home – including pets – when there is no other way to reach them.

"Deshalb müssen wir die Einzelheiten der Gesetzgebung vor ihrem Inkrafttreten genau prüfen und unsere Zustimmung dazu erteilen. Ich fürchte, er darf dies nicht einfach per Dekret zulassen."

Herr Hancock antwortete: „Natürlich müssen wir uns in dieser Pandemie manchmal schnell bewegen, manchmal mussten wir uns schnell bewegen und müssen es möglicherweise wieder tun. Die Herausforderung, die wir in diesem Haus haben, besteht darin, eine ordnungsgemäße Prüfung sicherzustellen und bei Bedarf auch schnell auf das Virus reagieren zu können. Das ist die Herausforderung, vor der wir alle gemeinsam stehen. & # 39;

Herr Baker twitterte später, dass das Treffen mit Gesundheitsminister Matt Hancock, Chef Whip Mark Spencer und Commons-Führer Jacob Rees-Mogg "herzlich und konstruktiv" sei.

"Ich hoffe und erwarte, dass wir eine zufriedenstellende Einigung erzielen", fügte er hinzu.

Die weitreichenden Gesetze und die Liste der Strafen wurden in juristischen Dokumenten enthüllt und traten am Montag in Kraft.

Laut Gesetz müssen sich Menschen in England selbst isolieren, wenn sie positiv auf Coronavirus testen oder vom Test- und Rückverfolgungsdienst kontaktiert werden oder mit Geldstrafen ab 1.000 GBP rechnen, die für eine vierte Straftat auf 10.000 GBP steigen.

Die Geldstrafen beginnen jedoch bei 4.000 GBP für Personen, bei denen zusätzlich festgestellt wird, dass sie „rücksichtslos“ gegen ihre eigene Selbstisolation verstoßen.

Wenn Sie beispielsweise in ein Büro oder einen überfüllten Ort gehen, wenn Sie wissen, dass dies Menschen gefährden kann, nachdem Sie aufgefordert wurden, sich selbst zu isolieren.

Der offizielle Sprecher des Premierministers sagte: „Wir wissen, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Menschen das Richtige tun will.

"Wir wollen, dass diejenigen, die rücksichtslos Risiken für die Gesundheit ihrer Freunde, Familien und Gemeinschaften eingehen, damit rechnen, dass dies ernst genommen wird."

Diejenigen, die positiv testen, müssen dies 10 Tage nach Auftreten der Symptome oder ab dem Testdatum tun, wenn sie asymptomatisch sind, während Mitglieder ihres Haushalts 14 Tage lang isolieren müssen.

In der Zwischenzeit stellte sich heraus, dass separate Gesetze, die ebenfalls am Montag in Kraft traten, Pubs, Bars, Restaurants und Cafés das Spielen von Musik über 85 Dezibel verbieten, obwohl Live-Auftritte ausgenommen sind.

Dieselben Regeln besagen auch, dass Pub-Vermieter oder diejenigen, die andere Veranstaltungsorte wie Hotelbars, Restaurants und Mitgliederclubs betreiben, „alle angemessenen Maßnahmen“ ergreifen müssen, um nicht mehr in Gruppen von mehr als sechs Personen auf dem Gelände zu singen und zu tanzen.

Hochzeitszeremonien und Empfänge sind von der Regel ausgenommen.

Farmer's £ 10.000 Geldstrafe für die Ausrichtung einer Hochzeit für 300 Personen auf dem Bauernhof

Ein Grundbesitzer wurde wegen Verstoßes gegen die Coronavirus-Bestimmungen mit einer Geldstrafe von 10.000 GBP belegt, nachdem berichtet wurde, dass bis zu 300 Personen an einer Hochzeit auf einem Bauernhof teilgenommen haben.

Die Polizei wurde am Samstag zur Feier an Land auf der Scarecrow Farm in der Whitehall Road in New Farnley, Leeds, gerufen. Am selben Tag wurden der Stadt zusätzliche Sperrmaßnahmen auferlegt.

Offiziere fanden eine große Anzahl von Menschen und laute Musik um ein Festzelt in Wäldern, zwei Generatoren in Industriegröße und Fahrzeuge, die weiterhin auf dem Gelände einfuhren.

Ein 49-jähriger Mann wurde als einer der Landbesitzer identifiziert und vorgeladen, weil er eine Versammlung von mehr als 30 Personen abgehalten hatte, die gegen die Coronavirus-Gesetzgebung verstießen.

Die Polizei von West Yorkshire teilte am Samstag zwischen 17.00 und 18.00 Uhr mit, dass zwischen 100 und 300 Personen an der Veranstaltung teilnahmen. Ein Anrufer berichtete, dass ein Kampf ausgebrochen sei.

Die Selbstisolationsregeln zeigen, dass es für diejenigen, die „rücksichtslos“ sind, wenn sie mit anderen in Kontakt treten, wenn sie wissen, dass sie sich selbst isolieren sollten, eine Geldstrafe von 4.000 GBP gibt.

Wenn Sie beispielsweise in ein Büro oder einen überfüllten Ort gehen, wenn Sie wissen, dass dies Menschen gefährden kann, nachdem Sie aufgefordert wurden, sich selbst zu isolieren.

Der offizielle Sprecher des Premierministers sagte: „Wir wissen, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Menschen das Richtige tun will.

"Wir wollen, dass diejenigen, die rücksichtslos Risiken für die Gesundheit ihrer Freunde, Familien und Gemeinschaften eingehen, damit rechnen, dass dies ernst genommen wird."

Die Mitarbeiter müssen außerdem eine Geldstrafe von 50 GBP zahlen, wenn sie ihrem Arbeitgeber nicht mitteilen, dass sie sich selbst isolieren müssen.

Die Regeln verbieten es einem Arbeitgeber auch, Mitarbeitern zu erlauben, an jedem Arbeitsplatz oder an jedem Ort, der mit ihrer Arbeit verbunden ist, zu arbeiten, während sie sich selbst isolieren müssen.

Arbeitgeber dürfen nicht wissentlich zulassen, dass Menschen zur Arbeit gehen, wenn sie wissen, dass sie sich selbst isolieren müssen.

Die Polizei wird Stichproben in Gebieten mit hoher Inzidenz und in Risikogruppen durchführen, die auf lokalen Informationen beruhen, so das Ministerium für Gesundheit und Soziales.

Personen mit niedrigem Einkommen, die nicht von zu Hause aus arbeiten können und dadurch Einkommen verloren haben, haben ebenfalls Anspruch auf eine neue Test- und Trace-Support-Zahlung in Höhe von 500 GBP, fügte die Abteilung hinzu.

Herr Hancock wurde kritisiert, als er heute Nachmittag im Unterhaus sprach.

Der konservative ehemalige Minister Chris Grayling sagte, er verstehe, dass Entscheidungen schnell getroffen werden müssten, und fügte hinzu: „Aber wenn es um neue nationale Maßnahmen geht und viele von uns Gebiete repräsentieren, in denen die Inzidenz des Virus im südlichen Teil meines Wahlkreises sehr gering bleibt In diesem Bezirk gab es letzte Woche keine Fälle.

'Before we embark upon measures that affect everyone, as opposed to firefighting in individual areas, it is really important that this House has the chance to really scrutinise and hold to account and challenge – we know he wants to do the right thing, we want to help him do the right thing.'

Mr Hancock replied: 'Help like that is always very welcome. What I can say is we want to ensure that the House can be properly involved in this process whilst also allowing the whole nation to move fast where that's necessary.'

He added: 'I welcome the rightful recognition that sometimes we do we have to decide at pace, this is an unprecedented situation and the truth is that the secondary legislation procedures were not themselves designed for a situation like this.

'The question is how we can have the appropriate level of scrutiny whilst also making sure that we can move fast where that is necessary.'

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus