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The Newcastle Chef delivers VERY naughty news to the Prime Minister during the BBC interview


A Newcastle chef sent Boris Johnson a very cheeky message during a BBC interview – when the North East woke up today with new lockdown restrictions banning people from meeting inside houses.

Residents of Newcastle, Gateshead, North and South Tyneside, Northumberland, Durham and Sunderland are prohibited from seeing friends outside their bubble after midnight.

Local companies have reacted violently to the new measures. Geordie boss Max Gott sent Boris Johnson a cheeky message when he appeared on the BBC to discuss the situation.

Lord God, head chef and co-owner of Bistro Forty Six in Newcastle, arranged an exhibition of British tits in the background of his Zoom interview and added a picture of the Prime Minister next to the birds.

Eagle-eyed viewers quickly noticed the naughty dig and used social media to praise the chef after he appeared yesterday.

On his own Twitter account, Lord God was a frequent critic of the Prime Minister and previously wrote: “Dear Boris Johnson. We are 40% busy. Even if we are full 7 days a week, we will not break even.

“It is not physically possible for us to make money under the current guidance. We need help! You absolute weapon. Lots of love, every independent restaurant. & # 39;

Local business support group NE1 Ltd said the rules "threaten the fabric" of Newcastle, that entrepreneurs were "desperate" at the "draconian restrictions" and deserved financial support to help them cope.

As data shows, there are only narrow margins between parts of the region affected by stricter lockdown rules and those that escape the same fate.

In the region, in which around 2.7 million people live, there are large differences in the rates of infection with coronaviruses. Cases are growing faster in some cities that have been spared the new regulations than in areas currently undergoing closures.

Figures also show that coronavirus hospitalizations across the region are at around 20 percent of their highest levels during the peak of the pandemic, and deaths in NHS hospitals have remained stable at three per day or less for 14 weeks.

Data shows Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees saw their cases per 100,000 rise 84 percent and 71 percent respectively over the past week but are not included in the process, while Gateshead, Sunderland and Durham are still banned from slower growth. However, these areas have mostly higher overall rates – although Durhams (58.6) is lower than Hartlepools (75.1).

Across the country, hospital admissions for Covid-19 patients are climbing to levels not seen since June, now at a daily average of 272, while the number of deaths is also increasing, now an average of 30 per day after that number fell early September to a low of just seven a day.

Newcastle, Sunderland, Durham, Gateshead, Northumberland and North and South Tyneside will face the new rule banning indoor socialization starting this morning

Max Gott, head chef and co-owner of Bistro Forty Six in Newcastle, arranged an exhibition of British tits in the background of his Zoom interview and added a picture of the Prime Minister next to the birds

Max Gott, head chef and co-owner of Bistro Forty Six in Newcastle, arranged an exhibition of British tits in the background of his Zoom interview and added a picture of the Prime Minister next to the birds

Coronavirus infection rates are rising in the northeast, with the number of cases per 100,000 people being highest in South Tyneside, Newcastle and Gateshead, while Northumberland has increased the fastest in the past week

Coronavirus infection rates are rising in the northeast, with the number of cases per 100,000 people being highest in South Tyneside, Newcastle and Gateshead, while Northumberland has increased the fastest in the past week

Data shows that 491 Covid-19 hospitals were admitted in the Northeast last month, compared to 361 in the Midlands, 264 in London, 109 in the Southeast, 72 in the East and 52 in the Southwest. Only the north-west of England with 552 admissions had more than the north-east during this time. Graphs show how the number of hospital patients with Covid-19 has changed in different regions of England since the pandemic began

Data shows that 491 Covid-19 hospitals were admitted in the Northeast last month, compared to 361 in the Midlands, 264 in London, 109 in the Southeast, 72 in the East and 52 in the Southwest. Only the north-west of England with 552 admissions had more than the north-east during this time. Graphs show how the number of hospital patients with Covid-19 has changed in different regions of England since the pandemic began

Detected: All areas in England, Scotland and Wales affected by stricter local restrictions due to a surge in Covid-19 cases

Detected: All areas in England, Scotland and Wales affected by stricter local restrictions due to a surge in Covid-19 cases

Seven out of twelve areas in the northeast will face stricter social distancing rules starting this morning – Newcastle, Sunderland, Durham, Gateshead, Northumberland, and North and South Tyneside.

The remaining five, including Darlington, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees, and Redcar and Cleveland, will escape the rules, though Hartlepool and Stockton have increasing infections faster than some trapped areas.

In the infection rates released by Public Health England last week, Hartlepool was listed as the second highest range in places of "increased support and concern".

The city in County Durham has an infection rate of 75.1 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people, almost double the 40.8 per week previously, according to the latest data from PHE.

Five of the top six spots on the list of worrying PHE are all in the northeast – Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees, Darlington and Redcar, and Cleveland are all below Hartlepool. All receive "extended support" but are not yet blocked.

All seven areas under the new socialization ban are already on Public Health England's list of areas of intervention, as people have been advised not to socialize with anyone outside their homes.

South Tyneside is currently the worst affected, with an infection rate of 177 cases per 100,000 people, making it the second worst in the nation.

Newcastle is also in the top 10 at a rate of 157 per 100,000, and the infection rate there tripled in one week from just 52.6 on September 18.

Bolton in the northwest still has the worst infection rate in the country, with a significantly higher rate of 200 cases per 100,000.

New lockdown measures may mean that areas with many people with Covid-19 and areas with fewer cases that are only included because of their proximity are grouped together.

Hartlepool is evading restrictions, but its infection rate has increased significantly than that of Durham, Gateshead and Sunderland, all of which are part of the lockdown measures. Confusingly, Durham also has a lower overall rate than Hartlepool (75 versus 59 per 100,000), although Sunderlands and Gatesheads are higher.

WHAT ARE THE NEW LOCKDOWN RULES IN THE NORTH EAST?

  • As of this morning, it will be illegal to meet with people outside your household indoors when you are in a house Durham, Gateshead, Newcastle, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, Northumberland or Sunderland. The rule includes meeting in pubs, pub gardens, or restaurants. Violations can result in fines ranging from £ 200 to £ 6,400.
  • People in these seven areas should not meet anyone they do not live with or who is not in their "bubble", in a house or garden. This is legally enforceable;
  • People are not allowed to meet in groups of more than six people anywhere, and officials advise people in these areas not to meet with anyone they do not live with.
  • Residents of the seven affected regions of the northeast should only travel outside the area in which they live if there is an important need to go to work or education, receive food or medicine, or help a vulnerable person who has no choice ;;
  • The Northeast must comply with all other national regulations, including not meeting in groups of more than six people, wearing face masks on public transport, and closing hospitality establishments such as pubs and restaurants until 10 p.m.

The highest rate of the week-to-week increase was in Northumberland, where infections rose 255 percent from 22.5 per 100,000 to 79.9.

The data represent the average daily rate of positive tests for the week ended September 25 compared to the week ended September 18.

It's not clear whether an increase in testing has resulted in higher infection rates in some areas – officials insist this is not due to rising cases nationally – but data shows that Hartlepool has the average number of swab tests done per day almost doubled in one month from 111 at the end of August to 291 in mid-September.

A MP warned last month that it was unfair to impose bans using "broad brush" tactics that could punish people in areas where virus levels were actually relatively low.

Conservative MP David Jones told MailOnline about the application of national restrictions in general: “I can understand that the government has to do something because there is certainly an upward trend.

“But there is no boom in the whole country. There are some parts of the country like Devon, Dorset that have very little viral activity at all.

"So it seems like a very wide brush … I would have thought something more focused would be better."

Today commentators responded to the Prime Minister's failure to explain the new lockdown rules in the northeast, for which he apologized.

Professor Lucy Yardley, a health psychologist and member of the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (Sage), said confusion has become a problem when it comes to complying with the Covid-19 rules.

She told BBC Radio 4's Today program, “I think it's a real problem that people try to follow top-down rules that are constantly changing and different in different places and organizations.

"I think we need fewer rules and more cooperation in order to find out in your individual situation how you can best minimize the risk to the people around you."

Prof. Yardley said people were starting to make personal adjustments to how closely they followed the latest coronavirus laws and guidelines, adding, "When you ask people if they are following the guidelines, by and large they tend to say yes.

“What they mean is that they follow up as far as they think it's useful, practical, and as far as they think it's necessary to keep the infection from spreading – and sometimes I think they're probably getting it right. & # 39;

Meanwhile, Tory MP Steve Baker said Mr Johnson's botched intervention was an example of the confusion the lack of debate caused.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “I think it was a vivid example of the problems you have when a hundred laws of parliament are used to make 247, I think, delegated laws that matter are subject to repeated change and revocation.

“When you get such a big and changing law, you even find ministers and the prime minister can't keep up.

What possible hope can the public have? I had a minister say to me yesterday, with horror in my eyes at the disease, that we may have to change the law every 24 hours. & # 39;

How the number of new coronavirus cases announced daily has changed since the first wave of the pandemic, when hardly any patient was tested for the disease. Top experts believe that more than 100,000 cases actually occurred every day in the spring

As of Sunday, 2,049 patients were treated for the disease, up from 764 two weeks ago and 1,319 in the last week. That number had been falling for four months after peaking at 20,000 in mid-April

As of Sunday, 2,049 patients were treated for the disease, up from 764 two weeks ago and 1,319 in the last week. That number had been falling for four months after peaking at 20,000 in mid-April

The Chairman of Newcastle City Council, a member of the Labor Party, made the government's decision to impose lockdown rules on the region, apparently without consulting the local authority.

Nick Forbes told local news site Chronicle Live, “While we were discussing possible further restrictions with the government, the Secretary of State stood up again and announced the changes without telling us he would do so.

ANGER ABOUT LOCAL RESTRICTIONS AND COMMUNICATION & # 39; DISGRACE & # 39;

Newcastle City Council chairman, a Labor Party member, made the government's decision to impose lockdown rules on the region, apparently without consulting the local authority.

Nick Forbes told local news site Chronicle Live, “While we were discussing possible further restrictions with the government, the Secretary of State stood up again and announced the changes without telling us he would do so.

“We want to work constructively with the government, but the way these measures are communicated in the headlines and without details does not add to public confidence.

"We asked for clarity on the new restrictions, tests and support for the most affected companies."

Mr Forbes accused the government of "making it up to you over time".

And the Northumberland Police Department and Detective Inspector has also voiced her outrage at the sudden social distancing laws expected of her staff.

In a tweet today, Kim McGuinness said: & # 39; It's a shame I, community councilors and our police heard about the tightening of North East Covid restrictions on the news …

“You can't blame people for being confused when the prime minister doesn't know what's going on! The government has to do better. "

Newcastle City Council cabinet member Irim Ali, Public Health Councilor, warned yesterday: "The continued rise in cases in Newcastle is alarming. We must all do our part to prevent the virus from spreading further and to smooth the curve," Chronicle reported Live.

Appealing to the public to follow guidelines and new laws to stop the spread of Covid-19, she said, “I know this is difficult and many of our communities have already sacrificed so much, but when we do not unite as one city, we will face the very real risk of taking over the virus.

"The additional measures that could be put in place as part of a full local lockdown would be disastrous for our city, our businesses and our communities."

“We want to work constructively with the government, but the way these measures are communicated in the headlines and without details does not add to public confidence.

"We asked for clarity on the new restrictions, tests and support for the most affected companies."

Mr Forbes accused the government of "making things up over time".

And the Northumberland Police Department and Detective Superintendent have also voiced her outrage at the sudden social distancing laws expected of their staff.

In a tweet today, Kim McGuinness said, & # 39; It's a shame I, community councilors and our police found out about the tightening of North East Covid restrictions on the news …

“You can't blame people for being confused when the prime minister doesn't know what's going on! The government has to do better. "

Adrian Waddell, the executive director of a business support group in Newcastle, was upset about the rules.

He said, “The government cannot impose such draconian restrictions on companies without providing immediate and full financial support.

& # 39; The latest announcement was made by companies starting to question the validity of the lockdown measures and using the empirical evidence of restaurant closings, which the government claims represent a 3.2 percent dispersion extreme despair answered virus. These companies now carry 100 percent of the blocking load without meaningful support to compensate for this. & # 39;

Newcastle City Council cabinet member Irim Ali, Public Health Councilor, warned yesterday: "The continued rise in cases in Newcastle is alarming. We must all do our part to prevent the virus from spreading further and to smooth the curve," Chronicle reported Live.

Appealing to the public to follow guidelines and new laws to stop the spread of Covid-19, she said, “I know this is difficult and many of our communities have already sacrificed so much, but when we do not unite as one city, we will face the very real risk of taking over the virus.

"The additional measures that could be put in place as part of a full local lockdown would be catastrophic for our city, our businesses and our communities."

The Prime Minister faced yet another backlash after failing to explain clearly what the new rules meant for residents of the Northeast when asked on live television this morning. Mr Johnson appeared confused when asked if people were allowed to meet friends in pub gardens.

The rules mean that people can only do this if the people they are with are part of their own household or support the bubble according to the rules in place.

Mr Johnson was convicted for failing to report this, implying that the rules would not apply to pub gardens.

Newcastle Council Chairman Mr Forbes said: “You cannot just sneak your way through situations like this. Catching up has massive consequences, confuses people and undermines public health goals, but local and central governments are trying to achieve it. & # 39;

There are concerns that an influx of more than 60,000 students to the Northeast could in some cases lead to a spike as they tend to live close together in large households, socialize frequently, and may be less likely to follow social distancing rules.

There are universities in Durham, Sunderland, Newcastle and Middlesbrough and thousands of young people will have moved to the area in September.

Around 7,000 freshmen have traveled to Durham alone, according to ITV, and the university has vowed to do whatever it takes to minimize outbreaks of the virus.

Students across the country have reported being locked up in their dormitories and raised concerns about the laws that allow coronavirus rules to be enforced.

In Newcastle and Northumbria, which have seen around 55,000 students returning after the summer, universities have warned that students could be expelled if they fail to adhere to social distancing rules.

Newcastle University Vice Chancellor Professor Chris Day said: "(Students who break the rules) will be the subject of a police investigation if it is serious enough," Chronicle Live reported.

"It was made very clear to them that they will also be subject to disciplinary procedures at universities," he said.

“It can range from a small fine to eviction. That was made very clear to them. & # 39;

While cases are the easiest way to measure how quickly an outbreak is growing, statistics also show that the number of people dying from Covid-19 in the northeast is now among the highest of any region in the country.

Last month – from August 27 to September 27 – NHS hospitals in the North East region confirmed 78 deaths, accounting for 23 percent of the total of 342 deaths across England during that period.

This is only lower than in the northwest, where there were 114 deaths over the same period.

For comparison: 67 people died in the Midlands, 35 in London, 33 in the South East, 11 in the East of England and four in the South West.

Of only seven hospital trusts in the country, which has recorded more than 10 deaths during that period, two were in the Northeast region – which includes the NHS teaching hospitals Yorkshire – Bradford (16) and South Tyneside and Sunderland (11) heard.

Tameside and Glossop Integrated Care in the north west of England is the NHS trust worst hit, and 40 people died there in the past month.

Official government data shows there has been a small spike in deaths in the region, but the moving average appears to have been falling again since the third week of September when it hit three a day on September 20.

There are now an average of two coronavirus deaths per day in the Northeast, compared with seven in the Northwest and 3.6 in the West Midlands. England's national average is 10 per day, which means the northeast is one-fifth.

Hospital admissions in the North East and Yorkshire are also among the highest in England, according to official figures.

Around a quarter of all hospitalized Covid-19 patients in the country are in the region where around a sixth of the English population lives.

According to the Ministry of Health, 441 of a total of 1,727 people are in the hospital in the northeast of the hospital.

Last month there were 491 recordings, compared to 361 in the Midlands, 264 in London, 109 in the South East, 72 in the East and 52 in the South West.

Only the north-west of England with 552 admissions had more during this time.

The number of daily admissions rose steadily from a low of an average of seven per day in August to 70 per day by September 26th.

That puts hospital admissions at around 17 percent of the height of the crisis in April, when 402 people were admitted to the region every day.

It has increased from 47 a day the week before and 22 a day the week before, showing that more and more people with Covid-19 are becoming seriously ill.

This mirrors the national pattern for England, which shows admissions rose from a low of 38 per day on August 15 to 272 per day by September 23, the latest data.

BRITAIN'S CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK IS SECOND CUT FASTER THAN SPAIN OR FRANCE

Britain's second wave of coronavirus grew faster than that of Spain or France until cases declined again yesterday, according to official figures.

Government statistics show the UK had an average of 5,816 new infections per day 20 days after first hitting the 2,000-a-day mark. In contrast, France's rate after the same number of days was 5,783 while Spain's was 5,157. Both European countries reached the turning point in the summer on August 14 and July 28, respectively.

And the difference in the rate of growth was the same when each country's population was taken into account, with the UK recording 87.27 new cases for every million people every day 20 days after the number rose above 30 per million.

The rate in France 20 days after exceeding 30 was 86.33, while in Spain it was only 72.43.

Both nations are believed to be a few weeks ahead of the UK after seeing their Covid-19 cases spike again in mid-August. Health Department statistics show that the second wave in the UK didn't start with the snowball until September 7th.

Boris Johnson and Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned earlier this month that they feared a second wave in Europe could hit the UK.

A drop in the number of daily cases yesterday – when 4,044 were announced – has pushed the UK's outbreak below that of France, although it continues to grow faster than that of Spain at the same stage.

Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientist, warned last week that the UK should follow in the footsteps of European nations and said last week that the country could hit 50,000 cases a day if it didn't take action.

A comparison of the outbreaks in the UK, France and Spain based on the time since the first run of 30 per 100,000 cases shows that the UK was briefly at the mercy of an outbreak that was accelerating faster than Spain or France. A drop in cases yesterday in the UK means it is slower than France's but still faster than Spain's at the same stage

A comparison of outbreaks in the UK, France and Spain based on the time since the first run of 30 per 100,000 cases shows that the UK was briefly at the mercy of an outbreak that was accelerating faster than Spain or France. A drop in cases yesterday in the UK means it is slower than France's but still faster than Spain's at the same stage

Leading scientists called Sir Patrick's doomsday projection "implausible" because 50,000 a day would put the fall rate many times higher than this.

Professor David Paton, an industrial economist at the University of Nottingham, said the 50,000 a day would be at least three times the rate currently in Spain or France.

He said to MailOnline at the time: & # 39; It seems like a very strange scenario. "As far as I can tell, it's not based on any particular modeling …

“It (also) seems strange to me to decide to compare it with France and Spain. Es gibt andere Länder, die sie hätten betrachten können, in denen sich die Fälle alle drei Wochen verdoppelt haben. Niemand weiß, was mit Fällen in Großbritannien passieren wird. Glauben sie wirklich, dass wir fünf- bis sechsmal mehr Fälle haben als Frankreich? & # 39;

Die Besorgnis nahm jedoch zu, als die Zahl der Menschen, bei denen in Großbritannien Covid-19 diagnostiziert wurde, in den Tagen nach der Wissenschaftlerkonferenz weiter zunahm.

Im Laufe der Woche zwischen dem 21. und 27. September stieg die durchschnittliche Anzahl der täglichen Neuerkrankungen in Großbritannien von 3.929 auf 5.816.

Die Zahlen sind von einem Höchststand der zweiten Welle von 6.874 Fällen am Freitag auf 4.044 gestern gesunken, was einen vorläufigen Hoffnungsschimmer für die Wirkung neuer Sperrmaßnahmen darstellt. Und sie sind nicht annähernd so hoch wie in den dunkelsten Tagen der britischen Covid-19-Krise im März und April, als Spitzenwissenschaftler schätzungsweise jeden Tag mehr als 100.000 Fälle auftraten, aber viele wurden nie getestet.

Auch der Ausbruch in Spanien scheint sich verlangsamt zu haben. Der tägliche Durchschnitt sank von 11.314 Fällen pro Tag bis zum 23. September auf 10.920 Fälle Ende letzter Woche. Die spanischen täglichen Fälle pro Million Menschen sind ebenfalls von 241 auf 233 gesunken.

Madrid, im Zentrum der spanischen Krise, musste fast eine Million Menschen in den ärmsten Gegenden der Stadt vor Ort sperren.

In Frankreich nehmen die Fälle jedoch immer noch zu. Der Tagesdurchschnitt liegt jetzt bei 12.115, und die Infektionsrate pro Million liegt am Samstag bei 182. Dort sind die durchschnittlichen täglichen Fälle in nur einer Woche um 2.000 gestiegen – von 10.116 am 21. September, als die Infektionsrate 155 betrug.

Um die wachsenden Fälle einzudämmen, hat Paris zusammen mit elf anderen Städten eine Ausgangssperre für Bars um 22 Uhr und ein Limit von 10 Personen für gesellschaftliche Zusammenkünfte eingeführt.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Matt Hancock (t) Coronavirus