TECHNOLOGY

The new breast cancer test, developed by Olivia Newton-John's charity, is to be clinically tested


The new blood test for breast cancer detection was developed by the Olivia Newton-John Institute as a major breakthrough

  • A new breast cancer technology based on blood tests is to be tested in Australia
  • The study will run for three years and will test former sufferers for the return of cancer
  • Women take the less invasive and more convenient test every three months

A new blood test for breast cancer, created by the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, could replace current screening methods.

The Melbourne-developed test is used to screen 18,000 Australian women diagnosed with cancer each year for their return.

It was developed by Associate Professor Alexander Dobrovic and examines DNA that is specifically related to tumors in the patient's blood.

Premier Denis Napthine, Olivia Newton-John and John Brumby ONJCRI chairmen during the official opening of the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Institute in 2014

A new breast cancer test created by the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute could replace current screening methods with a blood test

A new breast cancer test created by the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute could replace current screening methods with a blood test

The test will go to clinical trial within the next three years, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Patients will likely have a blood test every three months, with the amount of cancer-specific DNA correlating directly with the severity of the disease.

If successfully tested, the technology could possibly replace mammograms and be used for early detection.

"There is potential to change this to use it for early detection," said Professor Dobrovic.

Professor Dobrovic is also said to assist in the development of the blood test procedure for the detection of melanoma.

He said the technology could be useful for other types of cancer.

Associate Professor Alexander Dobrovic developed the test, which searches for DNA that is specifically related to tumors in the patient's blood

Associate Professor Alexander Dobrovic developed the test, which searches for DNA that is specifically related to tumors in the patient's blood

Patients welcomed the idea of ​​the simple test, such as cancer patient Kath Sroka, who had a tumor that grew for 12 months before it was discovered.

& # 39; I think it would be a game changer. If you were able to test for DNA, you could test faster and more often and not wait a year, ”she said.

She said the test, which could be done at any local health center, was much more convenient and reassured her.

If tested successfully, the technology may replace mammograms and be used for early detection

If the test is successful, the technology may replace mammograms and be used for early detection

The project received a $ 385,000 grant from the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

The latest funding is part of the Foundation's $ 9.2 million commitment to zero breast cancer deaths.

The Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute was founded by the Greek actor who recently announced that she is suffering from her third cancer attack.

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