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The ministers call on the public to report neighbors who violate the new "six rule".


Today's ministers urged people to sneak up on their neighbors if they break the new coronavirus curbs of the Rule of Six.

Police Minister Kit Malthouse said violations of the rules should be reported to the authorities amid a backlash to draconian measures.

The drastic intervention came when Home Secretary Priti Patel warned people would face criminal records and fines thousands of pounds for refusing to obey the law.

Meanwhile, the government's response to the surge in infections has been judged by top scientists to be panicked and flawed, assuming those responsible are a "dad's army" with no experience.

The restrictions are now in place in England after a weekend that many members of the public had one final meeting.

Gatherings of more than six people have been made illegal to curb an increase in coronavirus cases that experts have warned are on the verge of spiraling out of control. This means that many larger households can no longer meet with others.

However, the rules in England are stricter than Wales and Scotland, where children under the age of 12 are exempt from the crackdown.

There are fears that worse is in the making and a 10pm pubs curfew is being considered amid alarms that young people are "forgetting" Covid's regulations.

With Britain on the verge of yet another miserable lockdown:

  • Labor's Sir Keir Starmer endorsed the recent crackdown on people complying with restrictions but condemned the government's Shambolic testing system.
  • Police took action last night against young revelers who drank the alcohol before the new six-person limit for social gatherings was introduced today.
  • Nightingale hospitals have been "put on standby" and the nation has warned against complying with the prime minister's new rules or facing another full lockdown.
  • The government's "world's best" test system is in "chaos" with a backlog of 185,000 swabs and is sending the samples to Italy and Germany to cope with the strain.
  • Six West End theaters say they will reopen next month with temperature controls on the doors, face masks and socially detached seating.
  • Tory donors have urged the government to protect the economy above all, because without money there can be no health care.

The final countdown: Realizing Sunday might be their last big night, the drinkers made the most of the evening

In a round of interviews today, Police Minister Kit Malthouse said breaches of the rules should be reported to the authorities amid a backlash to draconian measures

In a round of interviews today, Police Minister Kit Malthouse said violations should be reported to the authorities amid a backlash to draconian measures

Warm weather encouraged the drinkers to be enchanted for the night

A woman gives her friend a piggyback ride after a night out

Young men and women used the weekend as a last chance to celebrate before the Prime Minister introduced the hardline rules

Late night bars and cafes took a final boost before restrictions went into effect across the UK this morning

Late night bars and cafes took a final boost before restrictions went into effect across the UK this morning

People were enjoying the autumn sunshine in Kings Cross, London when they met yesterday on a sunny Sunday afternoon

People were enjoying the autumn sunshine in Kings Cross, London when they met yesterday on a sunny Sunday afternoon

In Plymouth, the punters enjoyed a night at the Barbican on the final evening before they could see only five people

In Plymouth, the punters enjoyed a night at the Barbican on the final evening before they could see only five people

According to experts, the UK coronavirus response is being led by "Dad's Army" with no experience

Professor Tom Jefferson has criticized the government's decision to enforce stricter lockdown rules

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, said the new rules highlighted a "fundamental misunderstanding" of the current state of the coronavirus in the UK

Professor Tom Jefferson (left) and Professor Carl Heneghan (right) have criticized the government's decision to enforce stricter lockdown rules

The UK's coronavirus response is being led by a "dad's army" of well-paid people with no experience, two leading scientists said as they urged Number 10 to stop panic and abolish the controversial rule of six.

Oxford University Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson accused Boris Johnson of making a number of "catastrophic" mistakes since returning to work in April after his own battle against the killer virus.

The pair warned Downing Street that limiting gatherings that came into force today was "worrying" and "has no scientific evidence to back it up", arguing that it could have "serious consequences."

And when they called on ministers to get on with life because it is "unrealistic" to curb the spread of Covid-19, they warned that the government's "throw of the dice" could bring the public over the edge and said it should To be “put under the spell”.

Professor Heneghan and Professor Jefferson wrote in The Telegraph: "It is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence to support it and has potentially significant social consequences."

The column criticized the prime minister's handling of the pandemic, warning that he was "plagued by fears, doubts and fears".

And it was said he made a number of mistakes since returning to work in April after battling the killer virus himself.

The two experts added: “The rule of the six directives should be summarized.

When Boris Johnson returned to work in April after his treatment for coronavirus, he warned that lockdown restrictions must remain in place to prevent a second wave.

Since then, the prime minister, worried by fears, doubts and fears and surrounded by a platoon of advisors, has made one cautious, catastrophic mistake after another.

"Last week's dice roll of the 'Rule of Six' could well be the policy that is driving the UK public over the edge as it is a disturbing decision that has no scientific evidence and may end." have great social consequences. & # 39;

This morning, Mr Malthouse said families should report their neighbors if they saw they were breaking the rules.

And he did not rule out the possibility of a special hotline – although he insisted that the police's non-emergency number was the point of contact for the time being.

He said: & # 39; We are discussing what reporting mechanisms it could be. There is obviously the non-emergency number that people can call to report any issues they wish, and certainly at the lockdown – the initial stage of the lockdown – we saw an increase in these reports to the police.

“If people are concerned and believe that there has been a violation, that option is theirs.

"It is open to people to do this on the non-emergency number and if they are concerned and see something like this they should definitely think about it."

The government's "rule of six" was introduced today as it tried to combat soaring coronavirus infection rates by restricting sessions both indoors and outdoors.

The police can fine people up to £ 3,200 for breaking the new rules.

Mr Malthouse said today: “The police officers will of course assess the situation in front of you, but in the end we all have an individual duty to our collective health and we hope that this view will prevail.

“The police should first encourage people to obey, explain the situation to them and impose on them the duty they have for our collective health. Only in the situation where individuals refuse to comply should the police consider turning to enforcement. "

Ms. Patel wrote in The Sun that those who fail to pay the fines have a criminal record.

"These new rules are easier to understand and easier for the police to enforce," she said.

“I know that the law-abiding majority will adhere to these new rules as part of our national efforts. But there will be a small minority who don't, and the police have the necessary powers to take action against them.

"This disease is fatal and therefore it is right that the police take action where people break the rules."

Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC), said he accepted rule changes "being confusing to the public."

But he told BBC Breakfast that officials were working to make sure they were being followed. "That was a big challenge for the police over six months," he said.

& # 39; We had the initial universal lockdown, we've had changes since then, the public needs to understand those changes.

“We work with all of our partners in local government, with people who do business, with people who do other parts of the hospitality industry. We are part of the group that tries to explain the rules to members of the public and encourage people to comply with them. & # 39;

Meanwhile, leading experts have issued a withering verdict on the government's coronavirus response, which has been led by a "Dad's Army" of well-paid people with no experience.

Oxford University Professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson accused Mr Johnson of making a number of "catastrophic" mistakes since returning to work in April after his own battle against the killer virus.

The pair warned Downing Street that limiting gatherings that came into force today was "worrying" and "has no scientific evidence to back it up", arguing that it could have "serious consequences."

They called on ministers to get on with life because it was "unrealistic" to curb the spread of Covid-19. They warned that the government's "roll of the dice" could bring the public over the edge and said it should be "bundled".

Professor Heneghan and Professor Jefferson wrote in The Telegraph: "It is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence to support it and has potentially significant social consequences."

The column criticized the prime minister's handling of the pandemic, warning he was "plagued by fears, doubts and fears".

And it was said he made a number of mistakes since returning to work in April after battling the killer virus himself.

The two experts added: “The rule of the six directives should be summarized.

When Boris Johnson returned to work in April after his treatment for coronavirus, he warned that lockdown restrictions must remain in place to prevent a second wave.

Since then, worried by fears, doubts and fears, and surrounded by a platoon of advisors, the Prime Minister has made one cautious, catastrophic mistake after another.

"Last week's dice roll of the 'Rule of Six' could well be the policy that is driving the UK public over the edge because it is a troubling decision that has no scientific evidence and may end." have great social consequences. & # 39;

The professors continue to criticize the government's attempt to blame young people for a recent surge in Covid-19 infections and ask what the purpose of the Eat Out to Help Out program is if there are any increases would.

They say the rule of six will have minimal impact, citing their years of research at the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine, which was set up to improve day-to-day clinical practice.

They wrote, "The decision to restrict gatherings is at its core a fundamental misunderstanding of what is happening to the coronavirus in the UK."

The Telegraph article points out that 600 Covid patients are currently in hospital, compared with 17,000 at the height of the pandemic.

Five people died with Covid-19 yesterday, compared to an average of more than 1,000 at the height of the pandemic.

In Camden, people took advantage of the good weather before the new restrictions came in when they gathered

In Camden, people took advantage of the good weather before the new restrictions came in when they gathered

Bournemouth beach yesterday as more than 3,000 coronavirus cases were recorded in the UK

Bournemouth beach yesterday as more than 3,000 coronavirus cases were recorded in the UK

Britain will dive back into Covid lockdown if people fail to abide by the new rule of six, the government adviser says

The UK must act quickly to prevent coronavirus cases from spiraling out of control as a “trickle” of cases can turn into a “cascade,” warns a researcher advising the government.

Peter Openshaw, professor of experimental medicine at Imperial College London, said that if people fail to adhere to the government's "rule of six" the country will face a "hard lock".

His comments come as NHS Nightingale hospitals are reportedly on "covid standby" as coronavirus cases emerge across the UK.

Boris Johnson's draconian new "rule of six" went into effect in England today as part of stricter social distancing measures for fear of a second wave.

Prof. Openshaw, a member of the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG), added that the UK needs to act quickly, even if a delay of a few days is potentially "dangerous".

Government tough tactics followed the cities last night as night owls had one last hurray before the rules and warm weather provided perfect conditions for social gatherings.

Sun-drenched areas like Bournemouth, Brighton and Nottingham were packed yesterday before tough new regulations to combat rising coronavirus infection rates went into effect.

But it came when officials urged young people to heed their warnings and remember the "importance of the rules" as the total number of cases in Covid continues to rise.

Around 3,330 coronavirus cases were reported today – an 11 percent increase over last Sunday. This is followed by 3,497 confirmed cases on Saturday and 3,539 cases on Friday.

Meanwhile, a report has found that up to 4.5 million people, who are most at risk from Covid, are being instructed to stay home under a new protection plan based on health, age and weight.

Letters with tailored advice are to be sent to individuals based on a new "risk model" that takes into account underlying health conditions, age, gender and weight.

It's being rolled out to areas with high rates of infection first, but a Whitehall source told The Sunday Telegraph, "If the rate is this worrying across England, we are ready to do it on a blanket basis."

In Bournemouth, sun worshipers lined streets and filled beaches to soak up the heat wave.

And in London, many went to bars and stood in close proximity despite the ongoing pandemic.

Many decided to push the boat out while they still could and went out for one last hurray before being confined to friend bubbles again.

Owain, 24, who had traveled to Brighton with friends from Guildford, Surrey on Saturday night, said: “This new rule means we can no longer go out as a group.

"It might even be after Christmas before we meet again, so we wanted to go out in style."

It was similar for families during the day yesterday. The Ledbetter family of Crawley, West Sussex, enjoyed Sunday lunch at the Brighton Music Hall.

Haydn Ledbetter (49), Mrs. Donna (45) and their two children joined three other friends and their families to form a group of 14.

They had taken over two benches to enjoy fish and chips in the sunshine.

Mr. Ledbetter, an airport worker, said: “In all fairness the government has made so many U-turns this summer that none of us trust them to make another good phone call.

"If the law is still in place at Christmas, I will definitely not obey it."

Before crackdown, Mr Buckland has warned that the government could go further next week and introduce curfews.

Speaking to Skys Sophy Ridge on Sunday, he said, “I think, as you have seen, we have been very willing to move quickly where it is needed and where the evidence points us.

“I think there is a problem with social occasions and social events, and especially with young people who get together and sometimes have a little too much fun and forget the meaning of the rules.

"I think it would be idle for me to speculate about what action we might need to take as winter approaches."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is believed to be considering putting a curfew on restaurants, bars and pubs at 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. if local action fails to control the spread of the virus.

The move is based on a concern that social distancing compliance will decrease the more people consume alcohol.

It comes amid growing fears that the virus could rage across the UK again.

Yesterday, the UK recorded a total of more than 3,000 coronavirus cases for the second year in a row – the first time since mid-May that cases were above this level on consecutive days.

The government said there had been an additional 3,497 laboratory-confirmed cases in the UK as of 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, slightly fewer than the 3,539 cases recorded on Friday.

Peter Openshaw, professor of experimental medicine at Imperial College London, spoke about the surge in cases, saying a "trickle" of cases could become a "cascade" as the country faces a "hard lockdown".

He said, “I think everyone agrees that we really need to act very quickly now to keep this from growing exponentially.

“I think that's the main point that we have to act quickly because it's so much harder to get things like that under control when you're late.

"Even a few days may be pretty dangerous right now."

Former Chief Scientific Advisor and member of the Emergency (Sage) Scientific Advisory Group Sir Mark Walport has warned that the country is "on the verge of losing control of Covid-19".

When asked if he thought Sir Mark was correct, Prof. Openshaw said to Ridge, "Well, I think that is correct."

Police across the UK started cracking down on illegal parties last night as revelers struck the city over ceremonies.

Officials broke up house parties in Altrincham, Stockport and Flixton, all in Greater Manchester, on Saturday night, while Nottingham police attacked a gathering of 50 people in Lenton.

At the largest gathering, which officials reportedly broke up last night, a Greater Manchester police team evicted around 70 partygoers from a house in Mottram.

Police are also investigating an illegal rave that took place in the leafy Surrey village of Wisley.

Under Boris Johnson's harsh new measures, groups of more than six people can be broken up by the police who will be able to hand out £ 100 fines to those who break the rules.

This will double up to £ 3,200 for each repeat offense, and only schools, workplaces and a limited number of other locations are exempt.

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Conservative MPs Committee, described the rule yesterday as "extraordinarily harsh" and said it interfered with a "right to normal family life".

Labor also supported a review of the rule to allow child liberation.

Rachel Reeves, Shadow Secretary of the Cabinet Office, said yesterday, “I think the simplicity of the rule of six is ​​useful, but I think the government needs to keep reviewing whether children need to be included in this rule or whether we can do more to bring families together. & # 39;

Sir Graham told BBC Radio 4: “The new restrictions are obviously extremely strict. They are a very serious interference with people's normal personal freedom and also with their right to normal family life. We have a parliament that is supposed to make some decisions. I suspect in this case that if I am not satisfied with the explanations for a rule of six instead of eight or ten, or whether children should be included or excluded, people like me might well vote against if we a vote.

"But I suspect, given that the opposition parties were in favor of banning everyone for as long as possible and removing all of their freedoms at every opportunity that the government would actually very easily win."

People with large families have also urged ministers to reconsider restrictions to keep young children out.

Sarah Pearson, 41, from Norwich has six children. The rule states that if as a group they meet someone outside of the family, they will be fined 100 pounds. She said: “We're being careful. It's another thing that separates them from friends. & # 39;

The move taken to combat the increasing spread of coronavirus came in yesterday in a government study that suggested the reproduction rate in England could be as high as 1.7.

Tim Robson, the Northeast's representative on the national Pubwatch program, expected police officers to closely monitor bars over the weekend to make sure they were working safely.

LONDON: General view of people having a night out in Soho in London's West End. People were warned of "party weekend" when a former chief scientific advisor said Britain was "on the verge of losing control of coronavirus"

LONDON: General view of people having a night out in Soho in London's West End. People have been warned not to have a "party weekend" as a former chief scientific advisor said Britain was "on the verge of losing control of coronavirus"

MANCHESTER: Drinkers flock to bars and restaurants in Manchester for an evening before lockdown restrictions tighten on Monday

MANCHESTER: Drinkers flock to bars and restaurants in Manchester for an evening before lockdown restrictions tighten on Monday

He said, "There is an expectation that everyone will have one major final seizure, but people are starting to get anxious and a lot of licensed premises have already been trapped by the police."

Mr. Robson, a former police officer, said it was up to licensees to manage their premises and prevent large groups from gathering unsafely.

He added, "There may be an increase in groups going out this weekend, but it will likely be in premises that don't have door surveillance and control."

Meanwhile, Newcastle upon Tyne's Public Health Director Eugene Milne has said he didn't think large numbers of people would be kidding in front of the tighter controls.

He told Tyne Tees TV News, "When the lockdown opened, there was a real fear that this might happen in the city and it didn't, so I think we can trust the people.

“The idea of ​​the rule of six is ​​to make it easier for people to know how to follow the instructions, and I think one of the big problems has been that the instructions have gradually become so complicated and specific to certain areas that it becomes very confusing for everyone. & # 39;

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the surge in infections justified the government's new "rule of six" and warned people "the pandemic is not over".

Cabinet minister Michael Gove called on people today to act in accordance with the rules this weekend before the "six rules" go into effect or the risk of increasing the rate of spread of the coronavirus.

He told BBC Breakfast, “When people behave in a way that is not really in line with or in line with the guidelines, they are putting other people at risk.

"The reason the country's police chiefs have said they hope people will act with reasonable restraint this weekend is because we don't want to see the virus spread accelerate further."

LONDON: Musicians with drums also played in front of crowds in the streets of Soho over the weekend

LONDON: Musicians with drums also played in front of crowds in the streets of Soho over the weekend

LEEDS: In Leeds, a street musician drew a group of around 50 people who celebrated and cheered as the musician played on the street

LEEDS: In Leeds, a street musician drew a group of around 50 people who celebrated and cheered as the musician played on the street

He denied the government would lose control of Covid-19. & # 39; No. I don't accept that, ”he said.

Mr Gove also denied claims that Chancellor Rishi Sunak's hugely popular Eat Out To Help Out program helped spread the coronavirus and that fines may be required to enforce rules on self-isolation.

Speaking to the BBC's Radio 4 Today, he said, "We are not saying that people shouldn't watch their friends, but there has to be a degree of self-discipline and limitation to face the challenges we face."

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster also responded to criticism of the government's crackdown on Covid, saying that people can only have freedom if they are exercised "responsibly".

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