ENTERTAINMENT

The map shows how Covid-19 infection rates have increased in the north of England after PHE's Excel error


Public Health England's Excel blunder has drastically changed the outlook for the English coronavirus outbreak, and infection rates in the north have increased overnight.

After the discovery that nearly 16,000 "missed" cases had been added to the system, infection rates rose in all agencies in the country except four over the weekend – all in the south.

The cases that were lost in the government system because an Excel spreadsheet reached its maximum size and could not be updated were mostly added in the northwest of the country, with other areas in the northeast and the Midlands also being hard hit.

The technical glitch meant that between September 25 and October 2, 15,841 cases were left out of the reported daily coronavirus cases and not referred to NHS Test and Trace, meaning tens of thousands of infected Brits may have been allowed to roam the streets.

And in a slow recovery from the Excel error on Friday, almost 6,000 Covid carriers remain to be tracked, some of whom received their positive Covid-19 diagnosis two weeks ago.

It is expected that each of these 6,000 wearers would have contacted three to four ignorant people before the isolation began. That is an estimated 18,000 to 24,000 people who have not been told to isolate due to their close contact with covid-19.

Yesterday's rolling 7-day infection rate – how many new cases were diagnosed per 100,000 people in the seven days through October – In large cities like Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Nottingham, Newcastle upon Tyne and Liverpool, the spike increased as the lagging data was properly recorded.

In Manchester, now England's Covid-19 hotspot, the infection rate rose 80 percent from 289.4 before the unreported cases were revealed to 529.4 after adding about 3,000 to the city's list. Nottinghams tripled from 100.6 to 382.4, Leeds doubled from 149.3 to 316.8 and Sheffields increased 2.5 times from 110.1 to 286.6.

The analysis – based on government data from the Press Association – Babergh in Suffolk saw the largest increase in the infection rate (791 percent from 2.2 to 19.6), followed by Exeter (326 percent from 61.6 to 262.5) and Fenland in Cambridgeshire (323 percent, from 7.9 to 33.4).

After the discovery that nearly 16,000 "missed" cases had been added to the system, infection rates rose in all agencies in the country except four over the weekend – all in the south. Most of the cases were added in the northwest of the country, with other areas in the northeast and the Midlands also being severely affected

In Manchester, today's Covid-19 hotspot in England, the infection rate - expressed as cases per 100,000 people - rose by 80 percent from 289.4 on October 2 to 529.4 on October 5. The infection rate in Leeds rose 112 percent from 149.3 to 316.8 over the same period

In Manchester, today's Covid-19 hotspot in England, the infection rate – expressed as cases per 100,000 people – rose by 80 percent from 289.4 on October 2 to 529.4 on October 5. The infection rate in Leeds rose 112 percent from 149.3 to 316.8 over the same period

Sheffield's quota rose 160 percent from 100.9 to 286.6. In Nottingham, East Midlands, the case rate tripled from 100.6 to 382.4

Sheffield's quota rose 160 percent from 100.9 to 286.6. In Nottingham, East Midlands, the case rate tripled from 100.6 to 382.4

The PA News Agency provides the 7-day rolling 7-day rate of new cases of Covid-19 for each local authority in England on a daily basis.

The rate is expressed as the number of infections per 100,000 people. In Manchester, 530 per 100,000 people caught Covid-19 in the past week – that's one in 189 people.

PA yesterday announced current Covid-19 rates based on data in the seven days leading up to October 2, after fixing the bug in reporting cases of PHE on Sunday evening.

It found that the infection rate in 311 authorities in England has increased compared to data from previous days, with only four remaining stable and falling slightly. Isle of Wight, Crawley, Cornwall and Isles of Scilly and Maldon.

On average, the infection rate in each agency has increased 90 percent from the previous count by PA on October 2. The percentage changes ranged from just five percent in Harlow, London, to 791 percent in Babergh.

Heatmaps show how the Northwest suffered significantly from the case census error that Matt Hancock grilled over at the House of Commons today.

Mr. Hancock claimed his department was still looking for contacts but it was unclear "in advance" how many there were, exactly. It was followed by Labour's vice-chairman Angela Rayner, who asked him to resign for having "shamefully" handled the crisis on Good Morning Britain.

EXCEL BLUNDER LOSES 16,000 CASES: HOW DID IT HAPPEN?

Matt Hancock told MPs yesterday that there was a technical problem with the system over the weekend, which brings together data from NHS test sites and tests processed by commercial companies.

Public Health England (PHE) told PA News Agency that the problem was caused by an Excel file that was at its maximum during an automated process.

The spreadsheet used in PHE's legacy software contained too much data from the laboratories and therefore threw off thousands of cases to be forwarded to NHS officials to start contact tracing. They were also not uploaded to the government's public coronavirus dashboard.

According to PHE, the files have now been broken down into smaller, multiple files to prevent the problem from occurring again.

Mr Hancock said it was decided in July that the legacy PHE system needed an upgrade, with orders for a new system to be awarded in August.

Officials from PHE and Test and Trace said the people tested received their Covid-19 test results "normally".

Once the missing cases were reported, officials said the information was given "immediately" to NHS Test and Trace so that contact tracing could begin and those in contact with those who had the virus would be instructed to themselves isolate yourself.

But the mistake will have resulted in an inevitable delay in reaching some contacts.

Labor said yesterday that around 48,000 people who have come into contact with a Covid-19 case may “blessedly not know” that they are spreading the disease if they should be told to self-isolate.

Millions of people in the northwest are already facing stricter Covid-19 restrictions, including a ban on mixing with other households in their own four walls or in public places like the pub.

However, the addition of thousands of cases has raised fears that more areas could be pushed into tougher lockdowns.

Manchester now has the highest rate in England at 529.4 cases per 100,000. That's an increase of 246.4 per 100,000 on October 2, based on data in the seven days through September 25 – before the computer failure.

In the seven days leading up to October 2, a total of 2,927 new cases were recorded.

In the surrounding districts of Salford, Bury and Rochdale in the Greater Manchester area, the seven-day rolling rate rose to 278.2 (plus 77 percent), 253.4 (plus 53 percent) and 287.3 (plus 74 percent), respectively.

Knowsley, a borough of Merseyside, and Liverpool have the second and third highest rates in England at 498.5 (up 76 percent) and 487.1 (up 69 percent), respectively.

Other areas of Merseyside where the seven-day rate has risen sharply are Wirral (up 39 percent to 209.6), Sefton (61 percent to 307.9) and St Helens (up 44 percent to 311.8) .

Lancashire was also hit by the cases. The infection rate from Rossendale rose 55 percent to 223.8, Blackburn with Darwen rose 46 percent to 207.1, Pendle 43 percent to 294.2, Hyndburn 42 percent to 269, and Burnley 21 percent to 411.6.

Further in Yorkshire and Humber, the university cities of Leeds and Sheffield have also seen significant increases in their infection rates.

Sheffield's quota rose 160 percent from 100.9 to 286.6 and Leeds rose 112 percent from 149.3 to 316.8. Bradford, West Yorkshire, also saw a 65 percent increase from 153 to 253.1.

The University of Sheffield's statistics website, Covid-19, showed that nearly 500 students and staff tested positive since the fall semester began last week.

And in Nottingham, where 425 students were diagnosed with Covid-19 in just one week, the case rate increased threefold, from 100.6 to 382.4.

Residents of Nottingham, which has two universities, have reportedly been told to prepare for strict lockdown measures, according to the Telegraph.

All locations listed so far have been subject to stricter restrictions for at least two weeks, some of them longer. There is cause for concern that action in any way does not help suppress cases.

According to the date of sampling rather than the date of government disclosure, the UK had 11,404 cases as of September 30, almost as many as were reported in the next two days combined

PHE MEMO DISCOVERS LOST CASES

The cases removed from the Department of Health's census due to Public Health England's counting error were revealed in a memo to Sky News.

They show that between September 25 and October 2, an average of 8,328 cases were announced per day, with a high of 11,754 on October 2 and a low of 4,044 on September 28. The latter number is unchanged from the Ministry of Health's own count.

The adjusted data suggests that the current average number of daily cases – calculated from the past seven days – is approximately 10,600. This is an increase from an average of 6,100 that would have been seen in the week ending last Monday.

25th of September

September 26th

September 27th

September 28th

September 29th

30. September

October 1

October 2nd

6.874

6,042

5,693

4.044

7.143

7.108

6,914

6,968

7.831

6.786

6,450

4.044

8,558

10.157

11,047

11,754

Officials' disastrous failure to release data in a timely manner will further exacerbate the problem as local health teams struggle to understand the outbreak.

One of the best virus experts in Leeds ruled the test and trace error "unacceptable" after the city violated the 300 cases per 100,000 lines.

Dr. Stephen Griffin, a viral oncologist at the University of Leeds, said it is difficult for local and national governments to plan responses to Covid cases if they cannot trust the numbers.

He told LeedsLive: 'My first reaction when I saw this was' good sadness'. However, if you look back and look at the data, we've seen the majority in the past few days.

“It's difficult to make a decision about these numbers because we're not sure – it's a real frustration. I don't know what (the government) is going to do now.

"An important aspect of the mix-up was that we really had to understand whether the local measures were working – that will be difficult to understand now."

Newcastle in the northeast saw one of the largest spikes in reported cases at 399.6 per 100,000 people in the seven days ending October 1, up from 256.6 the week before, after adding thousands of new cases.

Near Gateshead, South Tyneside, and North Tyneside, infection rates rose by at least 50 percent. County Durham rose 81 percent.

Newcastle City Council Labor leader Nick Forbes asked how local authorities could make "life-changing decisions" for residents and businesses if they couldn't rely on government data.

Mr Forbes said, “This is yet another catastrophic failure of an incompetent government ruthlessly moving from one preventable disaster to another.

“Throughout the northeast, we called for additional restrictions and measures based on the data available to us. We did not request these changes lightly and made decisions based on information and insight.

“If we can't rely on the data we get from the government, how can we make these life-changing decisions and do what's best for our residents and businesses?

"It is important that we have the right data at the right time so that we can protect our residents, support our businesses and enable our region to recover from this pandemic."

Ministers blamed an Excel spreadsheet error they had been concerned about for weeks and outdated computer software for the 16,000 cases that disappeared in the transfer from PHE to NHS Test and Trace.

Although positive Covid-19 patients have been told they have the disease, only half have been contacted by the NHS to discuss their moves since the bug was first revealed on Friday, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said yesterday.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson was unable to say on Monday morning how many contacts with positive coronavirus cases had been overlooked.

Labor said yesterday that around 48,000 people who have come into contact with a Covid-19 case may “blessedly not know” that they are spreading the disease if they should be told to self-isolate. Jonathan Ashworth, Shadow Health Secretary, said testing problems "put lives at risk".

It is not exactly clear how the "Shambolic" event will play out. However, local health chiefs were appalled, wondering how to make decisions based on such unreliable government data.

Mr Hancock said in the House of Commons yesterday, "I want to reassure the House that outbreak control in nursing homes, schools and hospitals is not directly affected, as outbreak management in these environments does not depend primarily on this PHE system."

He said it was decided in July that the legacy PHE system needed an upgrade, with orders for a new system to be awarded in August.

Mr Hancock said it was "critical that we work together to fix these issues that have been encountered even by PHE employees who work hard late Friday night".

He added, "This incident should never have happened, but the team acted quickly to minimize its impact. Now it is important that we work together to correct this and make sure it never happens again."

Regarding the scale of the pandemic, Hancock said the government's assessment had "not changed significantly" after the mistake.

"This morning the Joint Biosecurity Center (JBC) gave me their updated analysis of the epidemic based on the new numbers," he said.

& # 39; The Chief Medical Officer (Chris Whitty) has analyzed that our assessment of the disease and its effects has not changed materially based on these data.

& # 39; The JBC has confirmed that this does not affect the basis on which decisions about local action were made last week. However, this is a serious problem that is currently under extensive investigation. & # 39;

It came after a shocking surge in coronavirus cases was recorded in the UK yesterday. The Department of Health announced 12,594 more positive tests – more than three times the 4,368 recorded two weeks ago – and the first "clean" count since the Excel problem was fixed.

Last Monday's data, which is usually a good reference point, is now unreliable due to a catastrophic counting error at Public Health England which means September 21st will be the last Monday with an accurate number.

HOW HAS THE INFECTION RATE CHANGED, WHERE THEY LIVE? LOCAL AUTHORITIES ARE LISTED FROM HIGH TO LOW DUE TO THEIR SEVEN-DAY ROLE RATE IN THE WEEK UNTIL OCTOBER 2
local community Infection rate (cases per 100,000) before (October 2) Infection rate (cases per 100,000) after (October 5) Percentage change Case change (cases per 100,000)
Manchester 289.4 529.4 83% 240
Knowsley 283 498.5 76% 215.5
Liverpool 287.7 487.1 69% 199.4
Newcastle upon Tyne 239.4 434.9 82% 195.5
Burnley 340.8 411.6 21% 70.8
Nottingham 100.6 382.4 280% 281.8
Leeds 149.3 316.8 112% 167.5
St. Helens 216.5 311.8 44% 95.3
Sefton 191.4 307.9 61% 116.5
Wait 220.2 299 36% 78.8
Preston 216.6 294.8 36% 78.2
Pendulum 205.2 294.2 43% 89
Rochdale 165.5 287.3 74% 121.8
Sheffield 110.1 286.6 160% 176.5
Salford 157.6 278.2 77% 120.6
Hyndburn 188.8 269 42% 80.2
Exeter 61.6 262.5 326% 200.9
South Tyneside 162.9 255 57% 92.1
Sunderland 165.6 254.6 54% 89
To bury 165.5 253.4 53% 87.9
Bradford 153 253.1 65% 100.1
Oldham 169.5 244.2 44% 74.7
Bolton 177 237.9 34% 60.9
Hartlepool 131.3 226.3 72% 95
Rossendale 144.1 223.8 55% 79.7
West Lancashire 137.4 217 58% 79.6
Trafford 126 215.3 71% 89.3
Wigan 134.2 214.5 60% 80.3
Middlesbrough 110.7 213.5 93% 102.8
Weird 150.9 209.6 39% 58.7
Tameside 138.2 209.3 51% 71.1
Blackburn with Darwen 142.3 207.1 46% 64.8
Ribble Valley 106.8 202 89% 95.2
Warrington 151.4 199.5 32% 48.1
Gateshead 115.8 195.5 69% 79.7
North Tyneside 118.8 192.9 62% 74.1
Stockton-on-Teas 103.4 182.4 76% 79
Stockport 96.1 181.6 89% 85.5
South Ribble 108.3 172.4 59% 64.1
Darlington 109.5 172.3 57% 62.8
Northumberland 123.4 171.2 39% 47.8
Rotherham 88.9 162.4 83% 73.5
Kirklees 96.6 162.1 68% 65.5
County Durham 88.9 160.5 81% 71.6
Barrow-in-Furness 111.9 156.6 40% 44.7
Blackpool 86.8 154.2 78% 67.4
Coward 108.5 150.5 39% 42
York 66 143.9 118% 77.9
Birmingham 109.6 143.6 31% 34
Lancaster 66.4 143.1 116% 76.7
Rushcliffe 50.3 141 180% 90.7
Redcar and Cleveland 60.5 135.6 124% 75.1
Calderdale 83.7 132.4 58% 48.7
Broxtowe 46.5 130.7 181% 84.2
Leicester 80.7 130.1 61% 49.4
Chorley 72.7 126.9 75% 54.2
Wakefield 72.6 126.6 74% 54
Barnsley 65.6 124 89% 58.4
Fylde 106.5 121.3 14% 14.8
Oadby and Wigston 63.1 121 92% 57.9
Cheshire West and Chester 69.1 118.3 71% 49.2
Richmondshire 72.6 115.4 59% 42.8
Sandwell 85.2 114.5 34% 29.3
Cheshire East 56 113 102% 57
Doncaster 54.2 110.6 104% 56.4
Gedling 45 106 136% 61
High peak 61.5 104.7 70% 43.2
Walsall 65.5 103.7 58% 38.2
Harrogate 52.9 103.2 95% 50.3
Solihull 78.6 102.6 31% 24
Wyre 71.4 101.7 42% 30.3
Stafford 55.4 101.3 83% 45.9
Oxford 60.3 99 64% 38.7
Newark and Sherwood 84.1 98.8 17% 14.7
Hambleton 48 97.2 103% 49.2
Redbridge 62.2 93.7 51% 31.5
Coventry 61.4 92.6 51% 31.2
Great Yarmouth 59.4 91.6 54% 32.2
Charnwood 35 90.9 160% 55.9
East Riding of Yorkshire 51.3 90.3 76% 39
Newcastle-under-Lyme 52.5 89.6 71% 37.1
Richmond upon Thames 36.9 86.4 134% 49.5
Scarborough 43.2 86.4 100% 43.2
North East Derbyshire 37.5 85.7 129% 48.2
South Lakeland 29.5 84.7 187% 55.2
Hackney and City of London 44 84.6 92% 40.6
Bromsgrove 34 84.1 147% 50.1
Selby 49.7 82.8 67% 33.1
West Lindsey 28.2 82.6 193% 54.4
Blaby 48.3 81.8 69% 33.5
South Staffordshire 52.5 80 52% 27.5
Ashfield 43 79.7 85% 36.7
Hertsmere 27.6 78.2 183% 50.6
Erewash 38.1 78 105% 39.9
hull 28.1 75.8 170% 47.7
harrow 34.2 75.8 122% 41.6
Ryedale 34.3 75.8 121% 41.5
Haringey 34.6 75.2 117% 40.6
rugby 42.2 74.4 76% 32.2
Ealing 47.1 74.3 58% 27.2
swamp 62.2 74.2 19% 12
North Lincolnshire 38.9 73.1 88% 34.2
Elmbridge 23.4 72.4 209% 49
Bassetlaw 35.8 71.5 100% 35.7
Tower hamlet 40.3 70.5 75% 30.2
Barnet 33.3 70 110% 36.7
Lincoln 54.4 69.5 28% 15.1
Wolverhampton 56.2 69.5 24% 13.3
East Staffordshire 34.2 69.3 103% 35.1
Hounslow 50.8 68.5 35% 17.7
Dudley 48.5 66.9 38% 18.4
Worcester 37.5 66.2 77% 28.7
Derby 32.6 66.1 103% 33.5
Newham 53.8 65.1 21% 11.3
Brent 39.7 64.6 63% 24.9
Melton 21.5 64.4 200% 42.9
Amber Valley 38.2 64 68% 25.8
East Northamptonshire 27.5 63.5 131% 36
Islington 35.5 63.5 79% 28
Lichfield 31.5 63 100% 31.5
Harborough 30.9 62.9 104% 32
Hammersmith and Fulham 38.3 62.7 64% 24.4
Waltham Forest 33.2 62.5 88% 29.3
Stoke-on-Trent 41.7 61.2 47% 19.5
Wychavon 28.6 61 113% 32.4
Hinckley and Bosworth 37.1 61 64% 23.9
Havering 48.5 60.9 26% 12.4
Windsor and Maidenhead 26.4 60.1 128% 33.7
Brentwood 27.3 60.1 120% 32.8
Nuneaton and Bedworth 37 60.1 62% 23.1
St. Albans 34.4 59.3 72% 24.9
Enfield 37.4 59.3 59% 21.9
Stratford-on-Avon 22.3 59.2 165% 36.9
Hillingdon 42 59 40% 17th
Allerdale 31.7 58.3 84% 26.6
Bedford 39.8 58.3 46% 18.5
Watford 29 58 100% 29
Croydon 25.9 57.4 122% 31.5
Shropshire 34 57.3 69% 23.3
South Bucks 42.8 57.1 33% 14.3
Wandsworth 27.3 57 109% 29.7
Lambeth 27.3 57 109% 29.7
Uttlesford 39.4 57 45% 17.6
South Derbyshire 34.5 56.9 65% 22.4
East Hertfordshire 28 56.8 103% 28.8
Telford and Wrekin 37.8 56.7 50% 18.9
Luton 52.1 56.3 8th% 4.2
Bolsover 32.3 55.9 73% 23.6
Kingston upon Thames 29.3 55.8 90% 26.5
Lewisham 24.2 55.6 130% 31.4
Bark and Dagenham 48.4 55 14% 6.6
North East Lincolnshire 25.7 54.5 112% 28.8
Southwark 31.7 53.9 70% 22.2
Woking 27.8 53.6 93% 25.8
Chesterfield 21st 53.4 154% 32.4
Epping forest 38.7 53.2 37% 14.5
Rutland 30.1 52.6 75% 22.5
Guildford 22.8 52.3 129% 29.5
Copeland 30.8 51.3 67% 20.5
Dacorum 32.3 51 58% 18.7
Malvern Hills 29.2 50.8 74% 21.6
Westminster 24.9 50.5 103% 25.6
Spelthorns 28 50.1 79% 22.1
Daventry 20.9 50 139% 29.1
South Kesteven 21.8 49.1 125% 27.3
Peterborough 23.2 48.9 111% 25.7
Bath and North East Somerset 26.4 48.1 82% 21.7
Rushmoor 14.8 47.6 222% 32.8
North Warwickshire 30.6 47.5 55% 16.9
Epsom and Ewell 17.4 47.1 171% 29.7
Waverley 23 46.7 103% 23.7
Staffordshire Moorlands 24.4 46.7 91% 22.3
Basildon 30.4 46.5 53% 16.1
Wellingborough 25.1 46.4 85% 21.3
South Gloucestershire 23.5 46.3 97% 22.8
Kensington and Chelsea 25.6 46.1 80% 20.5
Three rivers 37.5 46.1 23% 8.6
Bristol 19.4 45.5 135% 26.1
Wyre Forest 40.5 45.4 12% 4.9
Northampton 15.6 45 188% 29.4
Bexley 19.3 44.7 132% 25.4
Runnymede 20.1 44.7 122% 24.6
Cannock Chase 22.8 44.7 96% 21.9
Redditch 32.8 44.6 36% 11.8
Huntingdonshire 19.7 44.4 125% 24.7
Mansfield 23.8 43.9 84% 20.1
Warwick 27.8 43.8 58% 16
Brighton and Hove 21.7 43.7 101% 22nd
South Cambridgeshire 20.1 42.7 112% 22.6
Tandridge 21.6 42 94% 20.4
Derbyshire Dales 11.1 41.5 274% 30.4
Camden 20.4 41.5 103% 21.1
Northwest Leicestershire 23.2 41.5 79% 18.3
Carlisle 28.5 41.4 45% 12.9
North Kesteven 21.4 41.1 92% 19.7
Greenwich 27.8 41 47% 13.2
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.3 40.5 60% 15.2
White Horse Valley 14.7 40.4 175% 25.7
Surrey Heath 23.5 40.3 71% 16.8
Bromley 21.1 39.4 87% 18.3
Lock point 24.3 38.7 59% 14.4
Winchester 19.2 38.4 100% 19.2
Broxbourne 31.9 38 19% 6.1
Tamworth 14.3 37.8 164% 23.5
Cheltenham 21.5 37.8 76% 16.3
Chiltern 21.9 37.5 71% 15.6
Torbay 25th 37.4 50% 12.4
Seven oak 16.6 37.3 125% 20.7
Gloucester 16.3 37.2 128% 20.9
Southampton 17th 37.2 119% 20.2
Mole Valley 14.9 36.7 146% 21.8
Kettering 20.6 36.4 77% 15.8
Chelmsford 24.1 35.9 49% 11.8
Merton 22.8 35.3 55% 12.5
Wokingham 21.6 35.1 63% 13.5
Test Valley 12.7 34.9 175% 22.2
Somerset West and Taunton 16.1 34.8 116% 18.7
Cherwell 14.6 34.6 137% 20th
Corby 31.8 34.6 9% 2.8
Cambridge 21.6 34.5 60% 12.9
Wycombe 16.6 34.4 107% 17.8
West Berkshire 20.2 34.1 69% 13.9
Portsmouth 25.1 34 35% 8.9
Milton Keynes 19.7 33.8 72% 14.1
Eden 24.4 33.8 39% 9.4
North Hertfordshire 15.7 33.7 115% 18th
Hastings 16.2 33.5 107% 17.3
Fenland 7.9 33.4 323% 25.5
Welwyn Hatfield 17.1 33.3 95% 16.2
Thurrock 21.8 32.1 47% 10.3
Norwich 11.4 32 181% 20.6
Tunbridge Wells 16.8 32 90% 15.2
Hard 13.4 31.9 138% 18.5
Gravesham 9.4 31.8 238% 22.4
West Oxfordshire 19th 31.6 66% 12.6
Canterbury 16.3 31.4 93% 15.1
East Hampshire 14.7 31.1 112% 16.4
South Northamptonshire 13.8 30.7 122% 16.9
Horsham 13.2 30.6 132% 17.4
Plymouth 15.3 30.5 99% 15.2
Sutton 16 30.5 91% 14.5
South Oxfordshire 11.3 30.3 168% 19th
Southend-on-Sea 27.8 30th 8th% 2.2
Eastbourne 14.5 29.9 106% 15.4
Swale 10.7 29.3 174% 18.6
Teignbridge 11.9 29.1 145% 17.2
South Norfolk 19.9 29.1 46% 9.2
Chichester 17.3 28.1 62% 10.8
East Suffolk 13.6 27.7 104% 14.1
Central Bedfordshire 17.3 27.7 60% 10.4
South Holland 10.5 27.4 161% 16.9
West Suffolk 11.7 27.4 134% 15.7
read 21.6 27.2 26% 5.6
Bracknell Forest 14.7 26.9 83% 12.2
Dartford 20.4 26.6 30% 6.2
Mendip 12.1 26th 115% 13.9
Wiltshire 13.6 26th 91% 12.4
Mid Sussex 13.9 25.8 86% 11.9
King & # 39; s Lynn and West Norfolk 13.9 25.8 86% 11.9
Forest of Dean 19.6 25.3 29% 5.7
Stroud 10 25th 150% fifteen
Aylesbury Vale 13 24.6 89% 11.6
North Somerset 14th 24.6 76% 10.6
Cotswold 6.7 24.5 266% 17.8
Arun 18th 24.3 35% 6.3
Reigate and Banstead 10.8 24.2 124% 13.4
Lewes 11.6 24.2 109% 12.6
Tewkesbury 12.6 24.2 92% 11.6
East Devon 7.5 23.9 219% 16.4
Havant 17.4 23.8 37% 6.4
Braintree 13.1 22.9 75% 9.8
East Lindsey 16.9 22.6 34% 5.7
Wealden 6.2 22.3 260% 16.1
Mid Devon 8.5 21.9 158% 13.4
Medway 12.2 21.9 80% 9.7
Harlow 20.7 21.8 5% 1.1
New forest 13.9 21.7 56% 7.8
Breckland 10 21.4 114% 11.4
Boston 18.5 21.4 16% 2.9
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 24.8 21.3 -14% -3.5
Tonbridge and Malling 9.8 21.2 116% 11.4
Broad land 8.4 20.6 145% 12.2
Rochford 10.3 20.6 100% 10.3
Thanet 7th 19.7 181% 12.7
Babergh 2.2 19.6 791% 17.4
South Somerset 11.3 19.6 73% 8.3
North Devon 13.4 19.6 46% 6.2
Crawley 21.4 19.6 -8th% -1.8
Dorset 10.8 18.8 74% 8th
Adur 7.8 18.7 140% 10.9
Colchester 10.8 18.5 71% 7.7
Herefordshire 11.4 18.2 60% 6.8
Basingstoke and Deane 9.6 18.1 89% 8.5
Swindon 11.7 18th 54% 6.3
Rother 8.3 17.7 113% 9.4
Maidstone 9.9 17.5 77% 7.6
Mid Suffolk 8.7 17.3 99% 8.6
South Hams 10.3 17.2 67% 6.9
Precious 15.4 17.2 12% 1.8
Stevenage 8th 17.1 114% 9.1
Tendring 12.3 17.1 39% 4.8
Sedgemoor 13 17th 31% 4th
Ashford 6.9 16.9 145% 10
Maldon 18.5 15.4 -17% -3.1
Gosport 14.1 15.3 9% 1.2
West Devon 7.2 14.3 99% 7.1
Folkestone and Hythe 8.8 14.2 61% 5.4
Eastleigh 4.5 13.5 200% 9
East Cambridgeshire 12.2 13.4 10% 1.2
Ipswich 9.5 13.1 38% 3.6
Dover 6.8 11.9 75% 5.1
North Norfolk 4.8 11.4 138% 6.6
Fareham 8.6 11.2 30% 2.6
Torridge 5.9 8.8 49% 2.9
Isle of Wight 6.3 6.3 0% 0

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