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The Madrid court rejects government decisions to block the Spanish capital


The Madrid court rejects government decisions to block the Spanish capital and prevents police officers from imposing fines: Coronavirus measures "affect fundamental freedoms", judge rules

  • Officials wanted to forbid people from leaving their homes except for important business
  • The regional government, however, denied the order to destroy the economy
  • It has also been argued that the Ministry of Health has no right to impose such measures
  • The Court agreed that rules are an inference to people's “fundamental rights”.

A court in Madrid last week rejected tough new lockdown laws against the Spanish capital to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Health officials tried to ban 4.5 million people in the city from leaving the area they live in, with the exception of important shops, nearby parks and playgrounds, restricting gatherings to six, and a curfew on restaurants and bars at 23 Impose clock.

But the region's head of government, Isabel Diaz Ayuso, had spoken out against the order, saying it would destroy the region's economy. She also argued that the ministry had no power to impose such restrictions on a region.

The Madrid Regional Court endorsed her decision, calling the restrictions "interference by the authorities with the fundamental rights of citizens without a legal mandate to support them".

Police officers stop a car at a checkpoint during a partial lockdown in Madrid, Spain on Monday

The R rate in Madrid is 0.91, below 1.00 - this means that the infections are not multiplying

The R rate in Madrid is 0.91, below 1.00 – this means that the infections are not multiplying

A graph showing the first and second waves of the Madrid outbreak - it should be noted that the higher number of cases does not correlate with more deaths as the testing capacity is now much larger

A graph showing the first and second waves of the Madrid outbreak – it should be noted that the higher number of cases does not correlate with more deaths as the testing capacity is now much larger

In an initial government response – which can appeal the ruling – Health Minister Salvador Illa said he had not yet had time to study it.

& # 39; We will make the legal decisions that best protect health. We are sure that the Community of Madrid will agree to this approach. We only care about the health of the citizens, "he told a parliamentary committee without going into it.

The move means the police have no legal authority to impose fines on anyone who breaks the rules.

Ministers had approved the new rules to lower infection rates in Madrid after the city became one of the hardest hit areas in Europe.

According to WHO figures released last week, the city had 850 cases per 100,000 population, one of the highest infection rates in Europe.

According to the World Health Organization, there were 741 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in the Madrid region in the two weeks ending October 7. This makes it Europe's second densest COVID-19 cluster after Andorra.

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