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The Londoners are planning their escape from England's new lockdown


"Got out of London tomorrow": people living in the capital plan to escape before England's new national lockdown goes into effect

  • Londoners have responded to news that England will be locked in March
  • Boris Johnson addressed the nation last night asking them to stay home again
  • The draconian rules come into effect for the third time on Wednesday morning

People in the capital said it was "time to get out of London" after Boris Johnson put England into a draconian third lockdown since March.

Speaking to the Downing Street nation last night, Mr Johnson said the measures would likely stay in place for seven weeks – schools and universities would switch to online learning and vulnerable people should protect themselves.

The public is only allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons: go to work if necessary, shop for necessities, play sports – be with someone from another household, take care of someone, or seek medical help.

Traffic on the A40 Marylebone flyover in central London this morning, hours after the closure announcement

The public is only allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons, including going to work and shopping for essentials

The public is only allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons, including going to work and shopping for essentials

The Prime Minister urged people to follow instructions immediately before the March-style measures go into effect on Wednesday.

Londoners said they wanted to get out of the city – traffic on the capital's streets this morning increased four percent compared to yesterday.

A Twitter user wrote last night: "Bro, I have to get out of London tomorrow, can't be caught here."

Another wrote, "Well, for me, I'm still leaving London and running back to Coventry to do my Level 5 up there."

Others, ahead of last night's announcement, complained about the prospect of people from the city living below Tier 4 traveling along with parts of the country.

Londoners have suggested they could try to leave the capital before the lockdown officially begins on Wednesday. The Prime Minister has asked the British to obey the rules "immediately".

Londoners have suggested they could try to leave the capital before the lockdown officially begins on Wednesday. The Prime Minister has asked the British to obey the rules "immediately".

Boris Johnson announced last night that England would put in a March-style suspension that could last at least seven weeks. Londoners have voiced plans to leave the capital before the rules become law in the wee hours of Wednesday morning

Boris Johnson announced last night that England would put in a March-style suspension that could last at least seven weeks. Londoners have voiced plans to leave the capital before the rules become law in the wee hours of Wednesday morning

One wrote: "All those b ***** & # 39; Londoners & # 39; who are fleeing to their London homes in the north … heh f ****** & # 39; Londoners & # 39 ;."

Sitting behind a desk on Downing Street with his hands crossed, Mr Johnson made it clear that there is no chance they will be kept for at least seven weeks – and possibly longer if the vaccine roll out doesn't go well.

“Our hospitals have been under more pressure than ever since the beginning of the pandemic. It is clear that we need to do more while our vaccines are being rolled out, ”he said.

People are walking through Waterloo Station in London during rush hour that morning, which was not surprisingly quieter than usual

People are walking through Waterloo Station in London during rush hour that morning, which was not surprisingly quieter than usual

Light traffic at junction 44 of the M1 motorway near Leeds, Yorkshire at 8:20 a.m. today

Light traffic at junction 44 of the M1 motorway near Leeds, Yorkshire at 8:20 a.m. today

Traffic in London has increased compared to yesterday but remains well below average compared to this time last year

Traffic in London has increased compared to yesterday but remains well below average compared to this time last year

He said it was "not possible or fair" for exams to go ahead as usual this summer.

"The weeks ahead are going to be the toughest, but I really believe we're reaching the end of the fight," he said, promising that by mid-February the top four categories on the vaccine distribution list had their first pushes.

There are 13.2 million people in the top 4 groups on the vaccination list – nursing home residents and those over 80, frontline health workers, those over 70, and those at risk.

However, the prime minister admitted that all he could do was give assurances that the situation would improve, provided that our understanding of the virus does not change again.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the government should have gone further by extending the rules for wearing face masks to busy outdoor areas and tightening controls at borders.

"This government announcement of a full national lockdown was inevitable," said Khan.

"It is unclear why it took Boris Johnson so long to come to this conclusion."

No10 sources insist that the government wants to go back to a tiering system once the virus wears off and vaccinations make it possible.

Union leader Keir Starmer said the move was "imperative" and that his MPs would back it and effectively guarantee parliamentary approval.

The new lock in England at a glance

England is placed on a full national lockdown that will last until halfway through February.

According to the new rules:

  • All elementary and secondary schools also close immediate effect
  • Lessons remain only for vulnerable students and children of key workers.
  • They are due to reopen after the half-time break in February.
  • It is unlikely that A-Level and GCSE exams will run as planned in the summer.
  • The universities will remain closed to students until mid-February.
  • Kindergartens remain fully open.
  • The public should stay home unless they have to leave for one of only five reasons: when they cannot work from home, shop for necessities, play sports, provide care, and for medical treatment or emergencies.
  • All non-essential retailers, hospitality and "personal care" like hairdressers must close.
  • Restaurants and other eateries can continue to operate for takeout and delivery.
  • However, pubs are no longer allowed to offer take-away alcohol sales.
  • Children's playgrounds remain open.
  • All indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including golf courses, gyms, swimming pools, and tennis courts, must be closed, and team sports cannot take place outdoors.
  • Elite sports such as the Premier League can be pursued according to their own standards.

The instructions are aimed at people who are fit and healthy.

There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely susceptible to coronavirus and for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus infection.

You shouldn't go to work, school, college, or university and limit the amount of time you spend outside the home. The instructions state that you should only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

The rules for all people in England also state:

  • You can't leave home to socialize with someone who you don't live with or who you're not in a support bubble with (unless you are legally allowed to form one).
  • You can train on your own, with someone else, or with your household or support bubble.
  • You shouldn't meet anyone else you don't live with or with whom you've formed a support bubble unless there is a valid reason why you can.
  • Stay 2 meters away from people who are not in your household.

Detailed instructions on national blocking:

You are not allowed to leave your home or be outside of it unless you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (Fixed Penalty).

You can get a fixed fine of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You can only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to Parents to work) in order to look after disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder, limited to once a day and not outside of your area
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence).
  • You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave the house for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. to consult or treat a veterinarian
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are other reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting a residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

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(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Boris Johnson (t) London (t) Downing Street (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns